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Thread: Question about snares

  1. #1

    Default Question about snares

    I've used the search functionality but couldn't see this question addressed so I'm someone can help me out.

    I'm getting ready to set a snare for the first time. I figure a squirrel or two won't make much difference in the vast scheme of things and they'd be a comparitively easy first project for the next item on my "to do" list, which is learning to skin, clean and prepare something for the pot.

    So here's my question:
    Some of the material I've read cautions against leaving a human scent on the wire, stakes etc. I've read that the materials can be de-scented by waving them in campfire smoke.

    But I've also read that the critters are just as leery of smoke as they are of humans and that gloves should be worn instead.

    And I've also read accounts from people who don't seem to worry about human scent and apparently it doesn't affect their success rate.

    Sooooooooo, is de-scenting the snare materials really something to consider, and if so, what method would you advise?

    Thanks in advance.
    C.
    Life is too short to hurry through.
    ~ Kenny Salwey


  2. #2

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    I have never really worried about scent for rabbits and squirls, 'yotes,fox and bobcats it becomes and issue. An easier way for tree rats I have found is screw or peg a rat trap a few feet above the gound on a likely tree a little penut butter on the trigger and you are in like flint, takes up very little room in a pack. I carry a couple in all my bags.
    Any goverment big enough to give you everything you want is strong enough to take everything you have...T Jefferson

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catfish View Post
    I've used the search functionality but couldn't see this question addressed so I'm someone can help me out.

    I'm getting ready to set a snare for the first time. I figure a squirrel or two won't make much difference in the vast scheme of things and they'd be a comparitively easy first project for the next item on my "to do" list, which is learning to skin, clean and prepare something for the pot.

    So here's my question:
    Some of the material I've read cautions against leaving a human scent on the wire, stakes etc. I've read that the materials can be de-scented by waving them in campfire smoke.

    But I've also read that the critters are just as leery of smoke as they are of humans and that gloves should be worn instead.

    And I've also read accounts from people who don't seem to worry about human scent and apparently it doesn't affect their success rate.

    Sooooooooo, is de-scenting the snare materials really something to consider, and if so, what method would you advise?

    Thanks in advance.
    C.
    I would use dirt to rid the wire of human scent or run it through some pine needles or other such local trees etc. You could use smoke from a fire but that really doesn't stick to the wire, also I think you run the risk of chasing the squirrel off because of their fear of forest fires. Charcoal is better, run the wire over that. The other option is to wear heavy gloves while handling the snare but make sure the material isn't scented like some. Basically, any strange scent that isn't natural to their environment is risky.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the tips, guys. I'll let you know how I get on.
    Life is too short to hurry through.
    ~ Kenny Salwey

  5. #5
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I'm with beerrunner. Squirrels are just so curious about anything new in their territory that they will examine it despite scent. I think you could cover the snare in fox urine and sooner or later they would have to investigate it. By the way, before one of youse wiseacres asks, I don't collect fox urine.

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    Right.....it's just Gatorade in the bottle.
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  7. #7

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    OK, so I set the snare last night. Checked it before I went to bed...nothing. Checked when I got up...nothing. I work from home, so I've been checking it throughout the day (I can see it from the house)...still nothing.

    Until...

    A few minutes ago I was stood out on the front deck, taking a phone call and enjoying the spring sunshine. I glance over, and here's Mr. Squirrel with his head all but in the noose. I wasn't expecting to actually see anything get caught, but figure if I'm going to be setting traps, there's no point in being squeamish about watching them do their work.

    "Come on" I whispered "Just another couple of steps".

    And then the little bugger reached out with his left paw and pushed the loop to one side before continuing on his merry way.

    Ho hum.
    Life is too short to hurry through.
    ~ Kenny Salwey

  8. #8
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Squirrels are pretty ingenious little buggers. Find a tree that they frequent (hopefully not in your neighbor's yard) and rig up a squirrel pole. It will be hard pressed to get around that.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Squirrels are pretty ingenious little buggers. Find a tree that they frequent (hopefully not in your neighbor's yard) and rig up a squirrel pole. It will be hard pressed to get around that.
    I can do that, thanks.

    I think the trick will be to find a tree that isn't visible to the school bus that drives past the house in the early hours of the morning.
    Life is too short to hurry through.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Ole WV Coot's Avatar
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    Let me give you a little hint since you haven't caught any animals wild or domestic. Make sure that sucker is DEAD before you lay your hands on it. Don't think anyone has mentioned it before but any trapped animal, even ole Rover will eat you alive starting with the hand and working their way up. I have an old 22 single shot Winchester that has a grove just below the front sight where I punched a groundhog to make sure it was dead.

  11. #11

    Default mabey this will help

    theres some good vidieos on u tube about snaring rabbits

  12. #12

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    I snared almost exclusively when I ran a line in Alaska and snared small game at work. Small prey species like rodents and hares I never worried about scent. For the squirrel I used two fingers for the diameter and one finger off the pole. For fox, lynx I always boiled the snare in baking soda (turned it white) and handled them with gloves. So if it's a prey species you're after, scent is not a big issue but for predators it is. I really enjoyed snaring and still have quite a few stored. Snaring and trapping is illegal in WA state. Well you can set box traps. It was one of peta's biggest wins in the late 1990's. What a shame.

  13. #13
    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catfish View Post
    I can do that, thanks.

    I think the trick will be to find a tree that isn't visible to the school bus that drives past the house in the early hours of the morning.
    Now you got me picturing all these little dead squirrels dangling from a tree and a busload of traumatized 1st graders with tears rolling down their cheeks, or hiding under their seats shuddering.
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

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    A snare for squirrels has to be set up so that it is hidden from the squirrel by a fork in the trunk that it frequently moves through or between branches that it does also. Or it muct be a triggered and baited snare. I too have 2 rat traps in my pack that have a length of wire attached to them with an o-ring screw on the other end. and cooton balls with peanut butter smeared into them. works for rat trap bait and tinder.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoosierarcher View Post
    A snare for squirrels has to be set up so that it is hidden from the squirrel by a fork in the trunk that it frequently moves through or between branches that it does also. Or it muct be a triggered and baited snare. I too have 2 rat traps in my pack that have a length of wire attached to them with an o-ring screw on the other end. and cooton balls with peanut butter smeared into them. works for rat trap bait and tinder.
    Peanut butter smeared cotton balls for tinder? R U Serious?
    If ye love wealth greater than liberty, the tranquility of servitude greater than the animating contest for freedom, go home from us in peace. We seek not your counsel, nor your arms. Crouch down and lick the hand that feeds you; and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.
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    Dogs are not my whole life, but they make my life whole.

  16. #16
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    It gives it that peanutty smoky flavor.

    Why do you think you have to hide a snare from a squirrel?

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