Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 42

Thread: Bears

  1. #1
    Senior Member Tootsiepop254's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Oak Run, CA
    Posts
    203

    Default Bears

    They make me very nervous. I do not live in bear country, I have never seen one outside of the zoo. I am considering moving to the mountains, where I'm sure I WILL see them. Is there bear safe fencing to keep them away from the property? What would be a good gun to go out with (I know a small caliber would just piss them off, and the goal would be to make them run AWAY)? Thinking handgun and rifle.
    Cheer up, the worst is yet to come.


  2. #2
    Senior Member Power Giant's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    about 50 miles south of British Columbia
    Posts
    200

    Default

    I live in Grizzly and Black bear country. Around the house, I use a 12 gauge shotgun to repel black bears. I have never had to shoot one, just shoot in their general direction with bird shot. I have 000 buckshot and slugs staggered in the gun if things go sour. When hiking/backpacking I strong side carry a .454 Casull revolver. I feel that is the most powerful handgun cartridge that is still somewhat managable in the recoil department and the ammo is affordable. Personally, moose are far more unpredictable than bears and statisically more of a threat. Bears, though are attracted to human activity and therein lies the problem.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    South Central Alaska
    Posts
    50

    Default

    I live in Rural South Central Alaska in black and grizzly country. My wife and I also spend a lot of time at our remote cabin here in South Central Alaska. I carry a 12 gauge shotgun loaded with slugs only. Have had several bear encounters but luckily have not needed to fire at them yet after spending over 40 years of wandering around in Alaska. I still usually go prepared though in case I ever need to shoot.

  4. #4
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    57,803

    Default

    I can't even imagine pulling the trigger on a .454. My handgun with hand still attached would probably be several yards behind me. If the blamed thing didn't take my head off.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    134

    Default

    I remember an episode of Survivorman where he was headed into the mountains. He was talking to a bush pilot about the dangers. When he asked about bears, the pilot told him there were weekly encounters but they were basically a non-event. But when he asked about mountain lions, the pilot said that is what scares him.
    A grizzly is more temperamental, and if it attacks, it will usually quit if it thinks you're dead. That's why authorities suggest you play dead with a grizzly.
    A black bear is usually more easy going and pretty easy to scare off (they're used to running from grizzly's). But if they attack they are more likely to eat you. That is why authorities suggest you fight back against a black bear.
    A mountain lion will only be a problem if it is stalking you. It considers you to be just another meal. Much more dangerous than a bear just because of its attitude. But it is unlikely you will ever see one. If one does attack, fight back as hard as you can.

    When I was young my family went to picnic in a state park. There was nobody else around, only us. After we got up to leave and were walking back to the car, I turned around and saw a black bear at the picnic table looking at us. It was obviously looking for anything we had left behind. I stood there staring back at it (I didn't know any better). We were less than 20 yards apart with only sparse trees, mostly open space between us. My stepfather told me to come on to the car. I turned around and left. Nothing happened.
    I think bear encounters are emphasized way too much. It is extremely rare that anyone is even attacked, let alone killed. It's just that they're so big and strong it scares people. But the only thing bears are interested in is food, and they don't see you as food. Usually.
    Mountain lions may not be as big as a bear, but they are still very strong (all cats are). And needle sharp claws rip you to shreds very quickly and painfully (I've cut myself to the bone with a needle). And with hunting pressure being taken away they are getting bolder.

    OK, are you completely paranoid yet?

    Be careful and prepared, but don't worry about it. Make noise so you don't surprise them. Keep your camp clean. If you do see one it will probably be from a distance.

  6. #6
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    SE/SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    26,866

    Default

    Don't put bird feeders next to the house.......
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
    Member Wahoo Killer knives club....#27

  7. #7
    Senior Member Tootsiepop254's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Oak Run, CA
    Posts
    203

    Default

    Thanks for the tips! Power Giant - the handgun looks scarier than the bears! AKtrekker... I have grown up with in the Panoche hills... plenty of big cats there! I always have my dog to alert of dangers, and the pigs were more dangerous - but louder.

    Those who live in bear country, how do you keep bears away from the home and gardens and places you really don't want them?
    Cheer up, the worst is yet to come.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    South Central Alaska
    Posts
    50

    Default

    Bears are actively hunted here and so have a lot of respect for man. They very rarely cause any problems where we live but it does happen though. quite a few years ago now my wife, family and I were getting ready to go camping and I was in our old trailer getting it ready. My wife had started out to the chicken coop to take care of the chickens. She came back all out of breath and said there was a huge grizzly between the house and the coop on the trail. I grabbed the shotgun which was right there handy in the trailer and went after the bear. I found him. He was about 50 yards from me. My shotgun is a short barrel pistol grip 12 gauge only good for extreme close encounters. I decided to go back to the house and get my 300 win mag. I went back out but couldnt find the bear again. A neighbor shot the bear later that evening. another bear was in one of our neighbors house when they home. they shot and wounded it and it ran off. nobody around ever seen that bear again so it probably died. Anyway active hunting pressure keeps these encounters to a minimum. A good dog can also be a big help. Too often though, a bad dog will go out to a bear and irritate a bear until they go after the dog. A bad dog will come running straight back to you for help with the bear right behind. There are solar powered electric fences made for camp parimeters as bear deterents but dont know how effective they are

  9. #9
    Alaska, The Madness! 1stimestar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Little cabin in the woods, middle of Alaska.
    Posts
    5,248

    Default

    Teach yourself some bear safety. Watch these videos. Keep food and garbage cleaned up from around your house. Don't leave dogfood or compost outside. Then just be aware.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...withbears.main
    Why do I live in Alaska? Because I can.

    Alaska, the Madness! Bloggity Stories of the North Country

    "Building Codes, Alaskans don't need no stinking Building Codes." Sourdough

    Yes, I have wifi in my outhouse!

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    134

    Default

    phreshayr also has some bear safety videos. But I think bears in Alaska behave a little differently than in the lower 48.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2rQ6fwmuMY

    Tootsiepop, you don't live that far from several state parks. You know about the cats and the wild boar. I'm sure there are bears around, you just haven't seen them. And that's normal. Most people who first get into the outdoors are afraid of bears. After awhile you learn they normally won't bother you. In fact you will rarely see any of the animals you're afraid of.

  11. #11
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    SE/SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    26,866

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by phreshayr View Post
    ........................................ A good dog can also be a big help. Too often though, a bad dog will go out to a bear and irritate a bear until they go after the dog. A bad dog will come running straight back to you for help with the bear right behind. There are solar powered electric fences made for camp parimeters as bear deterents but dont know how effective they are
    Now that is most likely some thing no one would have never thought of......if they weren't there......Thanks for that kernel of wisdom.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
    Member Wahoo Killer knives club....#27

  12. #12
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    57,803

    Default

    I'd be getting rid of a dog. Having a cat that brings home a live mouse is pretty bad. Having a dog that brings home a live bear is unacceptable. At least in my book.

  13. #13
    Not a Mod finallyME's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    4,227

    Default

    where do you plan to go? Sierra bears are a LOT different than bears anywhere else, even within the black bear species.
    Alot of the bear advice people have given is great for where they live, but might not apply at all.

    Here is Utah, it really depends on which mountains I go to. Some mountain ranges don't have any bears.
    I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/FinallyMe78?feature=mhee

  14. #14
    Senior Member Old GI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Dunnellon, FL
    Posts
    1,725

    Default

    Hey, to avoid Bears, you guessed it, stay out of Chicag........ What's that hon? Oh .... nevermind.
    When Wealth is Lost, Nothing is Lost;
    When Health is Lost, Something is Lost;
    When Character is Lost, ALL IS LOST!!!!!!!

    Colonel Charles Hyatt circa 1880

  15. #15

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    S.W. Idaho, USA
    Posts
    910

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tootsiepop254 View Post
    " ... I am considering moving to the mountains, where I'm sure I WILL see them. ... Thinking handgun and rifle.
    What mountains and where?? My wife and I owned a vacation cabin in the Sierra on the western slope for 31 years, at about 6,000'. That was in Tulare County. There were lots of Black bears up in the Sierra but we were never bothered. Saw a few but no problems. Some people did have problems, but we were lucky I suppose.

    How skilled are you with a handgun? Rifle??

    If you're not a hunter, a .30-30 WCF in a Marlin 336 or Winchester 94, would be all you'd need as a "walking around" gun in the Sierra or Trinity Mountains, if you're worried about bears. Also there's not a mountain lion out there that'll stand up to a .30-30 with a well placed bullet.

    Handguns?? I often carried a S&W .41 Magnum or Ruger .45 Colt when my wife and I would go for a hike up there. My wife carried a Ruger Security Six in .357 Magnum. I wasn't worried about either caliber. I will say that I have a pretty fair knowledge of handgun shooting as does my wife.

    Practice with a rifle or handgun is very important. If you're not skilled with either and don't have the time or finances to practice a great deal, you might be better off with a can of good bear spray, such as UDAP.

    Just my thoughts on your question.

    Good luck.

    S.M.
    Last edited by Seniorman; 03-18-2014 at 09:27 PM.
    "They that can give up essential liberty to gain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."

    - Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790),U.S. statesman, scientist, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

  17. #17
    Senior Member Power Giant's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    about 50 miles south of British Columbia
    Posts
    200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    Don't put bird feeders next to the house.......
    This is huge. Bears hibernate in winter, so its okay to have a feeder then. Don't leave garbage, dog food, cat food, etc. Bears have a very good sense of smell. Bears are hunted with hounds here, so they are shy of dogs. My pet Lab has chased several large bears out of the yard. Mountain Lions are completely unpredictable. I was stalked by one in central British Columbia and no firearm with me. It was the only time that I was really scared while in the woods.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    The Keweenaw Peninsula of upper Michigan, about the middle of the south shore of Lake Superior
    Posts
    468

    Default

    Where I live along Lake Superior we have bears, wolves and Mountain lions. I generally carry a large caliber handgun when I am woods walking or tending to bait stations. Bears are generally going to avoid humans EXCEPT sows with cubs! The only time I have ever had cause for my safety was once when I was walking back through the woods from checking a lake and two bear cubs ran up a tree about 20 feet from me and I did not know where their mother was. I jumped on my trail bike and got out of there pronto. I am not particularly concerned about wolves but they are a pack animal and will defend a kill and there is always the possibility of encountering a rabid animal. I did have a wolf walk through my yard a couple of years ago. Now mountain lions are just sneaky and will stalk people. Probably just out of curiosity but if I am out with my three grand daughters - they would look like prey to a big cat. We also have moose but I have never seen on in the woods. They are not common where I live and hunt.

  19. #19

    Default

    If they were a problem for me, I'd set some of the snares that Ragnar Benson describes how to make. 8-10" wide, thick walled steel tubing, with a hole thru one side at the top, for the cable to the drag-log. drill holes into the tubing at about 30 degrees from the long axis. Weld long spikes into the holes, all around the tubing, up and down its 14" lenth. Bury it vertically, with the spikes pointing down. Put bacon grease at the bottom of the tubing. Have the top of the tubing flush with the ground-level. Such a drag log should be at least 8" in OD, and at least 12 ft long. It leaves a trail that a blind man can follow, but at the end of that trail is one PO'D bear, so have a 308 or 06 autorifle when you follow up, be alert, have "earvalve" earplugs in place, and if charged at close range, aim for the brain, shoot fast and repeatedly.

  20. #20
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    SE/SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    26,866

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swenlet View Post
    If they were a problem for me, I'd set some of the snares that Ragnar Benson describes how to make. 8-10" wide, thick walled steel tubing, with a hole thru one side at the top, for the cable to the drag-log. drill holes into the tubing at about 30 degrees from the long axis. Weld long spikes into the holes, all around the tubing, up and down its 14" lenth. Bury it vertically, with the spikes pointing down. Put bacon grease at the bottom of the tubing. Have the top of the tubing flush with the ground-level. Such a drag log should be at least 8" in OD, and at least 12 ft long. It leaves a trail that a blind man can follow, but at the end of that trail is one PO'D bear, so have a 308 or 06 autorifle when you follow up, be alert, have "earvalve" earplugs in place, and if charged at close range, aim for the brain, shoot fast and repeatedly.
    Seems like a lot of work to me.....and most likely illegal, unsafe for other people and animals.

    I'll pass.......hunted all my life in WI, have only seen/smelled a few in the woods (black) and they were headed out away for me.
    I've seen more in dumps and along the road.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
    Member Wahoo Killer knives club....#27

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •