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Thread: Wild Syrups.

  1. #21
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    I can recall have jelly and jams that were made with paraffin seal tops on the jars...make the jelly, pour hot wax on it to seal.

    ...and of course some times you had a crack, and mold on it, and yeah, just scope it off and away ya go.....
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  2. #22
    Junior Member towelie's Avatar
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    you mentioned prickly pear; I happen to have recently had the opportunity (last fall) to taste a bit of their fruit near shenandoah NP in Virginia. I know it is a cactus and all, but the prickly pear actually grows a lot of different places, as far north as southern Michigan. I digress: The fruit is usually a purple-ish red-ish color and I have no clue what pattern of seasons or whatnot it blooms in, but it tastes amazing and is essentially a skin around a sticky, syrup-like mushy substance containing the cactus' seeds. It could be made into a syrup I would guess by simply removing any thorns (very important!), cutting them open, removing and collecting their guts in a small pot, removing the seeds, mashing whats left into a pulp and boiling it until enough water has evaporated that you can call it a syrup. Simple. I need to try that myself...
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  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by towelie View Post
    you mentioned prickly pear; I happen to have recently had the opportunity (last fall) to taste a bit of their fruit near shenandoah NP in Virginia. I know it is a cactus and all, but the prickly pear actually grows a lot of different places, as far north as southern Michigan. I digress: The fruit is usually a purple-ish red-ish color and I have no clue what pattern of seasons or whatnot it blooms in, but it tastes amazing and is essentially a skin around a sticky, syrup-like mushy substance containing the cactus' seeds. It could be made into a syrup I would guess by simply removing any thorns (very important!), cutting them open, removing and collecting their guts in a small pot, removing the seeds, mashing whats left into a pulp and boiling it until enough water has evaporated that you can call it a syrup. Simple. I need to try that myself...
    thanks I am going to try to do that this year when I finally get around to harvesting the fruit

  4. #24
    Senior Member Awanita's Avatar
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    Wild syrup Hickory Bark syrup

    Gather your bark, was and get all debris of your bark. (Shaggy bark Hickory)

    Now there is two ways to do your bark. Some rinse the bark and then put in a flat pan and roast it just a little to get the hickory smoke flavor before boiling and some just boil it.

    Take scrub brush and scrub debris and try to get as much of the lechins off

    Cover with water bring to a boil and let simmer for 30 minutes

    strain off the hickory tea into heating pan

    Add 1 1/2 amount of surgar more than tea. 1/2 gallon takes 12 cups of sugar

    put syrup on to boil till the thickness you want.

    put into jars and seal, bath boil for 10 minutes.

    That is the way we do it on the Equa Vdali. LOL
    Awanita from the wild patato clan of the Tsalagi/Cherokee. "When the time comes, know how to only be seen when wanted to be seen".

  5. #25
    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    when I was a wee lad, we had dandelion honey made in the kitchen from dandelion flower. Not really a sirup per say but close.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Awanita View Post
    Wild syrup Hickory Bark syrup

    Gather your bark, was and get all debris of your bark. (Shaggy bark Hickory)

    Now there is two ways to do your bark. Some rinse the bark and then put in a flat pan and roast it just a little to get the hickory smoke flavor before boiling and some just boil it.

    Take scrub brush and scrub debris and try to get as much of the lechins off

    Cover with water bring to a boil and let simmer for 30 minutes

    strain off the hickory tea into heating pan

    Add 1 1/2 amount of surgar more than tea. 1/2 gallon takes 12 cups of sugar

    put syrup on to boil till the thickness you want.

    put into jars and seal, bath boil for 10 minutes.

    That is the way we do it on the Equa Vdali. LOL
    Quote Originally Posted by randyt View Post
    when I was a wee lad, we had dandelion honey made in the kitchen from dandelion flower. Not really a sirup per say but close.
    Okay thanks to both of you.

  7. #27
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    Down south in Mississippi and Louisiana, I've come across wild sugar cane.

    Simple way of explaining syrup from sugar cane: Cut the cane into chunks, and boil it for about an hour and half until the sugar cane turns completely brown. Strain out the sugar cane chunks, and boil it down until the liquid thickens. This process takes some time, but it's usually worth it.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adventure Wolf View Post
    Down south in Mississippi and Louisiana, I've come across wild sugar cane.

    Simple way of explaining syrup from sugar cane: Cut the cane into chunks, and boil it for about an hour and half until the sugar cane turns completely brown. Strain out the sugar cane chunks, and boil it down until the liquid thickens. This process takes some time, but it's usually worth it.
    Sounds like the same process used in maple. It also sounds delicious! XD

  9. #29
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    Default Fresh squeezed Sugar Cane juice, not recommended by dentist

    As a child in Brazil I occasionally purchased cups of cane juice freshly squeezed by vendors with hand crank machines for this purpose at vacation areas (swimming pools and beach etc). It was less fibrous than just chewing a cut piece of sugar cane. I also grew sugar cane in my yard but it quickly became infested with stinging ants, not worth the trouble. Buying dry molasses blocks from street vendors and sucking it like candy was another way of eating it.
    Theoretically you can make sugar syrup from sugar beets but from what I read the extra salts and minerals make it taste bad and are difficult to separate out.
    I would really like to be able to make Agave syrup, Aloe Vera blooms may also work. Probably some YT video showing how.

    Edit: OMG searched YT all this Agave and raw sugar makes you fat! No kidding! Common Sense, small amounts of sugar in foods, not by the cup full on a regular, daily routine. I.e. hike 10-30 miles a day, a teaspoon on your breakfast cereal might be OK.
    Last edited by TXyakr; 11-26-2014 at 03:53 PM. Reason: Edit: common sense, raw sugars in moderation

  10. #30
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    ....So there I was....watching the Legend of Mick Dodge.....
    http://channel.nationalgeographic.co...of-mick-dodge/

    In this episode he decides to tap a sugar maple for syrup.........

    So first goes to a friend to make him a rope ladder to go up a high cliff......then reach into stump and pick out maple syrup tools, (in new burlap).......then taps a tree.....and fills his syrup jug......suck the tap spout a bit.....has a pan full of fiddle heads w/syrup.......

    I'm thinking that maybe they kinda skipped a couple of steps........WHOLE LOT more to it than that.

    Oh yeah, a TV crew guy turns his ankle so the go a different way down....no rope ladder....

    Nothing to it....just head out in the forest and find a tree, and stump full of tools and go for it.
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  11. #31
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    A relative of mine works at a nature center where they have an enormous maple syrup collection every year. I'll try to get up to the 2015 one. I don't know if you want to count it or not, but there is honey.

  12. #32
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    Yes Zack I consider honey to be a syrup processed by bees that originates from plant blooms. It has many other useful properties besides just tasting good. My kids prefer corn syrup artificially flavored to taste vaguely like maple syrup over the real thing, OMG!! I have been a very bad parent allowing my wife to save a few buck on the grocery bill all these years.

    Hunter, I also found that "Legend of Mick Dodge" episode funny. First season it seemed that cameras were observing his somewhat normal everyday behavior. But then the TV producers always figure out that wilderness living/survival is very boring so they try to spice it up. It becomes less real. I heard Cody Lundin or someone else once say that 99% of wilderness survival is very boring. It is also a lot of hard work. Go video record some construction workers building a house, after a few days they will start doing all sorts of silly things just to entertain your "film crew". Human nature.

  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by TXyakr View Post
    Yes Zack I consider honey to be a syrup processed by bees that originates from plant blooms. It has many other useful properties besides just tasting good. My kids prefer corn syrup artificially flavored to taste vaguely like maple syrup over the real thing, OMG!! I have been a very bad parent allowing my wife to save a few buck on the grocery bill all these years.

    Hunter, I also found that "Legend of Mick Dodge" episode funny. First season it seemed that cameras were observing his somewhat normal everyday behavior. But then the TV producers always figure out that wilderness living/survival is very boring so they try to spice it up. It becomes less real. I heard Cody Lundin or someone else once say that 99% of wilderness survival is very boring. It is also a lot of hard work. Go video record some construction workers building a house, after a few days they will start doing all sorts of silly things just to entertain your "film crew". Human nature.
    Lol ya survival isn't enough for TV. :P

  14. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by TXyakr View Post
    As a child in Brazil I occasionally purchased cups of cane juice freshly squeezed by vendors with hand crank machines for this purpose at vacation areas (swimming pools and beach etc). It was less fibrous than just chewing a cut piece of sugar cane. I also grew sugar cane in my yard but it quickly became infested with stinging ants, not worth the trouble. Buying dry molasses blocks from street vendors and sucking it like candy was another way of eating it.
    Theoretically you can make sugar syrup from sugar beets but from what I read the extra salts and minerals make it taste bad and are difficult to separate out.
    I would really like to be able to make Agave syrup, Aloe Vera blooms may also work. Probably some YT video showing how.

    Edit: OMG searched YT all this Agave and raw sugar makes you fat! No kidding! Common Sense, small amounts of sugar in foods, not by the cup full on a regular, daily routine. I.e. hike 10-30 miles a day, a teaspoon on your breakfast cereal might be OK.
    I have had the cane juice fresh squeezed also. Tasted very grassy to me. Lots of islanders swear by it as a healthy drink. I can't remember what they said it was good for exactly. We gnawed on sugar cane when we were kids also.

    We have a lot of sugar cane in South Florida.

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Batch View Post
    I have had the cane juice fresh squeezed also. Tasted very grassy to me. Lots of islanders swear by it as a healthy drink. I can't remember what they said it was good for exactly. We gnawed on sugar cane when we were kids also.

    We have a lot of sugar cane in South Florida.
    Sadly it's to dry in Colorado for those. But we do have sugar beats.

  16. #36
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    Default some ways to use sugar beats

    Quote Originally Posted by wildlearner View Post
    Sadly it's to dry in Colorado for those. But we do have sugar beats.
    Unfortunately sugar beats are an overlooked food but like many root crops they are great for camping and can be kept for several days with no refrigeration thus a good one for backpacking, canoe, horseback, ATV etc camping.

    Sugar beats can be eaten raw, roasted, boiled, steamed, sautéed, dehydrated and even made into chips.

    Or you could just squeeze them use the syrup on your flapjacks and feed the pulp to your horse.

  17. #37
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Great. Now I have to buy a horse. It never ends I tell ya......Hey, honey...........

  18. #38
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    Default Pack animals in "horse towns" CA

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Great. Now I have to buy a horse. It never ends I tell ya......Hey, honey...........
    Funny. At one time and probably still there were more horses and horse owners in California than in Texas. I spent my Kindergarten year in Norco, CA which was a real "horse town" impossible to ride a bike or walk a straight line due to all the "road biscuits". Then many years later, lived a few months in another horse town: Yorba Linda (birth place of Pres. Nixon, God bless his disturbed soul). My butt has been bruised by many an hour on a horse and even water buffalo, not my preferred mode of transportation, but similar beasts can pack a lot of stuff especially for hunting trips in difficult terrain. Or if your maple groves are in remote areas, just day dreaming a bit. I have never tapped maple.

    It is just too hot in TX for horses much of the year and most species of maple trees. But I do have a Caddo Maple tree in my backyard, and there are some Big Tooth Maple trees at Lost Maples State Natural Area, I have hiked there but none of these are good for syrup as far as I know.

    Edit: horse hooves may be good for glue but not syrup… OH I shouldn't have gone there!
    I hear the French are no longer receiving shipments of their favorite protein from CA. OH NO!!!
    Je ne suis plus affamé
    Last edited by TXyakr; 01-12-2015 at 12:54 PM. Reason: stupid comment

  19. #39

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    AUSTRAILIAN GUM, imported from South Australia, is in elongated or globular pieces, rough and even wrinkled on the surface and of a violet tint, which distinguishes it from other varieties. It is not entirely soluble in water, to which it imparts less viscidity than ordinary Gum Acacia. It frequently contains tannin.

    Gum Acacia for medicinal purposes should be in roundish 'tears' of various sizes, colourless or pale yellow, or broken into angular fragments with a glass-like, sometimes iridescent fracture, often opaque from numerous fissures, but transparent and nearly colourless in thin pieces; taste insipid, mucilaginous; nearly inodorous. It should be almost entirely soluble in water, forming a viscid neutral solution, or mucilage, which, when evaporated, yields the gum unchanged. It is insoluble in alcohol and ether, but soluble in diluted alcohol in proportion to the amount of water present. It should be slowly but completely soluble in two parts of water: this solution shows an acid reaction with litmuspaper. The powdered gum is not coloured blue (indicating absence of starch) or red (indicating absence of dextrin) by the iodine test solution. It should not yield more than 4 per cent of ash.

    ---Adulteration---Adulteration in the crude state is confined almost wholly to the addition of similar and inferior gums, the detection of which requires only familiarity with the genuine article.

    In the ground condition it is adulterated oftenest with starch and dextrins, tests for which are given in the official description. Tannin is present in inferior gums and can be detected by the bluish-black coloration produced on adding ferric chloride. Gums of a yellow or brown colour usually contain tannin, and these, together with such as are incompletely soluble in water and which yield ropy or glairy solutions, should not be used for medicinal purposes.

    ---Chemical Constituents---Gum Acacia consists principally of Arabin, a compound of Arabic acid with calcium, varying amounts of the magnesium and potassium salts of the same acid being present. It is believed, also, that small amounts of other salts of these bases occur. (Arabic acid can be obtained by precipitating with alcohol from a solution of Acacia acidulated with hydrochloric acid.) The gum also contains 12 to 17 per cent of moisture and a trace of sugar, and yields 2.7 to 4 per cent of ash, consisting almost entirely of calcium, magnesium and potassium carbonates.

    ---Medicinal Action and Uses---Gum Acacia is a demulcent and serves by the viscidity of its solution to cover and sheathe inflamed surfaces.

    It is usually administered in the form of a mucilage - Mucilago Acaciae, British Pharmacopoeia and United States Pharmacopoeia made from small pieces of Gum Acacia dissolved in water and strained (1 in 8.75).

    ---Dose---in syrup, 1 to 4 drachms of the gum. Mucilage of Acacia is a nearly transparent, colourless or scarcely yellowish, viscid liquid, having a faint, rather agreeable odour and an insipid taste. It is employed as a soothing agent in inflammatory conditions of the respiratory, digestive and urinary tract, and is useful in diarrhoea and dysentery. It exerts a soothing influence upon all the surfaces with which it comes in contact. It may be diluted and flavoured to suit the taste. In low stages of typhoid fever, this mucilage, sweetened, is greatly recommended. The ordinary dose of the mucilage is from 1 to 4 fluid drachms.

    In dispensing, Mucilage of Acacia is used for suspending insoluble powders in mixtures, for emulsifying oils and other liquids which are not miscible with water, and as an ingredient of many cough linctures. The British Pharmacopoeia directs it to be used as an excipient in the preparation of troches. Compound Mucilage of Acacia - Pill-coating Acacia - is made from Gum Acacia, 1 in 10, with tragacanth, chloroform and water, and is used for moistening pills previous to coating.

    Gum Acacia is an ingredient of the official Pilula Ferri, Pulvis Amygdalae compositus, Pulvis Tragacanthae compositus, all the official Trochisci, and various syrups, pastes and pastilles or jujubes.

    Acacia Mixture, Mistura Acaciae of the British Pharmacopoeia Codex, is made from Gum Acacia (6 in 100) with syrup and diluted orange-flower water, employed as a demulcent in cough syrups and linctures.

    ---Dose---1 to 4 fluid drachms. Syrup of Acacia, British Pharmacopoeia Codex, used chiefly as a demulcent in cough mixtures, is freshly prepared as required, from 1 part of Gum Acacia Mucilage and 3 of syrup, the dose, 1 to 4 fluid drachms.

    The United States Pharmacopoeia Syrup of Acacia, though regarded as a useful demulcent, is chiefly employed as an agent for suspending powders in mixtures.

    The French Pharmacopoeia has a Syrup of Acacia and a potion gommeuse made from powdered Acacia, syrup and orange-flower water.

    As a dry excipient, powdered Acacia is employed, mixed in small proportion with powdered Marsh Mallow root, or powdered Liquorice root. A variation of this is a mixture of Acacia, 50 parts; Liquorice root, 34 parts; Sugar, 16 parts, all in fine powder. Another compound Acacia Powder used sparingly as an absorbent pill excipient, is made of equal parts of Gum Acacia and Tragacanth.

    Gum Acacia is highly nutritious. During the time of the gum harvest, the Moors of the desert are said to live almost entirely on it, and it has been proved that 6 oz. is sufficient to support an adult for twenty-four hours. It is related that the Bushman Hottentots have been known in times of scarcity to support themselves on it for days together. In many cases of disease, it is considered that a solution of Gum Arabic may for a time constitute the exclusive drink and food of the patient.

  20. #40
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    If you are gonna cut and paste, at least give credit to the original writer.

    http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/a/acaci006.html

    Quote>
    AUSTRAILIAN GUM, imported from South Australia, is in elongated or globular pieces, rough and even wrinkled on the surface and of a violet tint, which distinguishes it from other varieties. It is not entirely soluble in water, to which it imparts less viscidity than ordinary Gum Acacia. It frequently contains tannin.

    Gum Acacia for medicinal purposes should be in roundish 'tears' of various sizes, colourless or pale yellow, or broken into angular fragments with a glass-like, sometimes iridescent fracture, often opaque from numerous fissures, but transparent and nearly colourless in thin pieces; taste insipid, mucilaginous; nearly inodorous. It should be almost entirely soluble in water, forming a viscid neutral solution, or mucilage, which, when evaporated, yields the gum unchanged. It is insoluble in alcohol and ether, but soluble in diluted alcohol in proportion to the amount of water present. It should be slowly but completely soluble in two parts of water: this solution shows an acid reaction with litmuspaper. The powdered gum is not coloured blue (indicating absence of starch) or red (indicating absence of dextrin) by the iodine test solution. It should not yield more than 4 per cent of ash.

    ---Adulteration---Adulteration in the crude state is confined almost wholly to the addition of similar and inferior gums, the detection of which requires only familiarity with the genuine article.......................
    <Quote
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