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Thread: Wild Syrups.

  1. #1

    Post Wild Syrups.

    Ok so I have been looking at how to make syrups from wild edibles and found out about 2 types one is prickly pear syrup which is supposedly really good. And then the other which I can't find much about is hickory syrup and was wondering if any of you guys/girls know anything about it, or know how to make it. Or if you have another type of syrup that is really good.


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    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    There is also maple syrup and birch syrup, made from sap boiled down.
    so the definition of a criminal is someone who breaks the law and you want me to believe that somehow more laws make less criminals?

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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Have made sorghum syrup.....crushing it up......Looks kinda like corn or maize
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorghum

    Used an old wringer to press out the syrup, was really messy and sticky....but tasted pretty good, (was green and had "stuff" in it...LOL)

    Maple syrup is made around here...I haven't made any my self.
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    Wild blueberries too.
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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    One of our members does a lot with prickly pear fruit. http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...kly+pear+syrup
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    sadly maple that is not poison does not grow around here so I cant make edible syrup from them.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    If you do prickly pear beware the spines. I have called those tiny buggers just about every name imaginable. And seriously meant a good number of them.

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    Never heard of a poisonous maple. Some technically not edible, but not poisonous. I'll have to look into that.

    You can make syrup from rose hips. Clean them well and be sure to remove the seeds.

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    I have made syrup from Sugar Maple, Red Maple, Striped Maple, Box Elder, Butternut, White Birch, Yellow Birch, and Black Birch. I have heard that a good syrup can be made from Black Walnut, Basswood and some Poplars. If any of these sound like trees you have, let me know and I'll provide some details.

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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainmark View Post
    I have made syrup from Sugar Maple, Red Maple, Striped Maple, Box Elder, Butternut, White Birch, Yellow Birch, and Black Birch. I have heard that a good syrup can be made from Black Walnut, Basswood and some Poplars. If any of these sound like trees you have, let me know and I'll provide some details.
    How about aspens?
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    How about aspens?
    Poplars are an Aspen I believe, AKA Cottonwood (closely related to willows). I tried tapping one by my house last year and came up dry. I think it was Populus deltoids. But I'm wondering if I should have tapped it earlier. I tapped it late when I tapped the birch trees. I may have missed the run. It's a hard one to find info on though my googlefoo may be weak. I have heard it can be done. Wish I could provide more on that. I would be very interested in any info on tapping Salicaceae.

    *edit: I have info on the trees I HAVE tapped, not the latter ones on the list

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    I think the only trees around that I know of around here are aspens, and every once and a while I see a yellow birch.

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    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    Something jarred a memory so I did a search and came up with this.

    http://www.henriettes-herb.com/blog/...lag-syrup.html

    not really a edible as much as a herbal remedy.
    Last edited by randyt; 02-27-2014 at 10:36 PM.
    so the definition of a criminal is someone who breaks the law and you want me to believe that somehow more laws make less criminals?

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildlearner View Post
    I think the only trees around that I know of around here are aspens, and every once and a while I see a yellow birch.
    Well, I'll tell you that yellow birch has about 1/2 of 1% Sugar content. As where maple contains about 2-3% sugar. This means a lot more evaporation has to occur. Furthermore, birches start their sap run about the time the maples stop, so it is warmer out. I usually don't have a fire going at that point in the spring, but in TEOTWAWKI I likely will. I prefer to use passive heat when evaporating, it is just more efficient (if you are small scale like myself). Most (if not all) Birch syrup producers use a reverse osmosis machine to speed up the process. Be sure to use plastic or stainless pails (for collecting) as the traditional galvanized buckets for maple will give an "off" flavor to your end product. When you reach a more concentrated form of the sap it would be a good idea to reduce your temp as fructose burns at a lower temperature than sucrose (birch contains fructose, maple contains sucrose). The end product tastes a lot like molasses. Though Yellow Birch contains wintergreen oils that can be tasted by chewing on the twigs, this will not come through in you syrup. If you want that you will have to boil the fresh cut twigs in with the sap.

    For a wealth of info check out http://mapletrader.com/community/

    I hope it's ok to post a link to another forum that is not survival related. If not feel free to remove.

    There are folks on there who tap birches professionally and know far more than me. And they are a generally friendly group

    *edit: Birch trees are not quick healers like maples. You should plug the hole with a short piece of dowel after removing the taps to reduce the risk of infection and stop further sap loss.
    Last edited by mountainmark; 03-01-2014 at 01:01 PM.

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    BTW- Birch syrup sells for about $400 per Gallon in some locations.....

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    thx for the info

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    Update - I'm not going to take any chances with mold.
    Last edited by sjj; 05-08-2017 at 03:21 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sjj View Post
    I know that honey will store for a very long time, and if it hardens, it can be slowly heated to again become a liquid. Does anyone know for any certainty if syrups can be stored long term, and if so, which are best?
    It is my understanding that sugary syrups will store indefinitely, but may develop (if opened) surface mold. Like cheese, remove the mold and the rest is fine.
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    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    When I make maple syrup it is vacuum packed in jars.
    so the definition of a criminal is someone who breaks the law and you want me to believe that somehow more laws make less criminals?

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    Thanks folks.

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