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Thread: Wild Grapes?

  1. #1

    Default Wild Grapes?

    Hello everyone, I live in RI and I was hiking through the woods today. While hiking, I stopped for a moment and smelled grapes. Looking 20 feet away, I see a huge area full of grapes on their vines. Since I am not 100% positive they where wild grapes, I did not eat any but I believe, and still am easily convinced they where wild grapes. They where in a normal grape cluster, dark purple, just a little bigger than a marble and on vines. I plucked one and cut it in half, the inside was white and the smell was a strong grape.

    They where NOT poke berries either, wrong cluster formation, wrong vine, and last time I checked, pokeberry does not have a grape scent.

    So, are these wild grapes?


  2. #2
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    A picture would sure help.

    They may not have been wild grapes at all but domesticated grapes left over from some earlier farm? Just a guess but I've walked upon all sorts of beautiful roses and other perennials that were clearly planted but no sign of a farmhouse any longer.

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    Quality Control Director Ken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anitcol View Post
    Hello everyone, I live in RI and I was hiking through the woods today. While hiking, I stopped for a moment and smelled grapes. Looking 20 feet away, I see a huge area full of grapes on their vines. Since I am not 100% positive they where wild grapes, I did not eat any but I believe, and still am easily convinced they where wild grapes. They where in a normal grape cluster, dark purple, just a little bigger than a marble and on vines. I plucked one and cut it in half, the inside was white and the smell was a strong grape.

    They where NOT poke berries either, wrong cluster formation, wrong vine, and last time I checked, pokeberry does not have a grape scent.

    So, are these wild grapes?
    You weren't at Sakonnet Vineyards by any chance, were you?
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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    A couple of varieties of wild grapes are prolific in my area. Not sure about yours. Pics would be helpful.
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  5. #5

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    We have wild Concord grapes everywhere around here in MA. Some escaped cultivars and crosses too.
    Some people call em Fox Grapes.
    Would really need a picture though. Of leaf, stem and fruit.
    Not too many other things smell like over-ripe concord grapes though.
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  6. #6

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    Your head can spin with the names. Our muscadines are fruiting right now and we have been eating them in camp. Though we'll usually only eat a couple as they are seedy as hell. Also the skin is a little thicker than store bought grapes.

    The names can be deceptive and even the grape clusters can vary from vine to vine. I view the grapes as either Muscadine or Callosa grapes. I use the leaves as the identifier. I am no expert.

  7. #7

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    Sorry for not getting back to you guys, school takes over my life. Heres a couple pictures

    imageshack.^^^us/photo/my-images/42/0xzh.jpg/
    imageshack.^^^us/photo/my-images/841/h4oe.jpg/
    imageshack.^^^us/photo/my-images/200/vrnj.jpg/


    Take out the 3 ^^^; Sadly I do not have enough posts to do pictures lol


    The third picture is just ONE of the major vines, if you look closely in the back ground you can see the thicker pieces of this vine!

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Make a couple more posts to bring your count up to 10 and then try posting again.
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    Quality Control Director Ken's Avatar
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    Here, let me help......

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    Quality Control Director Ken's Avatar
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    “Learning is not compulsory. Neither is survival.”
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  11. #11

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    those do look like grapes. my neighbor use to have a cross-breed of wine and concord. The plant looks a fair amount like yours.

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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Ken....take the sheath off before you chop........Just saying.
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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    I was wondering how he sharpened that leather.
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  14. #14

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    For any visitors heading down this way, we have our very own Native Grape.

    Cissus hypoglauca

    It is one of the better known climbing plants of the genus Cissus in the grape family. A very common climber in moist areas of eastern Australia, it often colonises large areas after forest damage due to storms, fire or logging. Common names include jungle grape, water vine, giant water vine, five-leaf water vine, jungle vine, native grapes and billangai .
    It was initially described in 1854 by American botanist Asa Gray.

    The fruit are less than half the size of commercial table grapes, and taste pretty darn good. The large vine is also a source of drinkable water.
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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Trick is to beat the birds, to them.

    Has been said that wild grapes get sweeter after a frost.....that never really made ant sense to me simply because a lot of place don't get frost....or if they do....the birds have already gotten to them.

    Have a few on my fence here in town......along with climbing ivy........Birds get those as the one I have tried tend to be sour and seedy.
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  17. #17

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    i have about a 100,plants 90 of which are wine grapes winter hardy developed by the UofMN
    mainly red but do have some white. their kinda growing wild now as i don,t have time as i once did to maintain them sad
    cause i spent the first 4yrs training them. last year i called over some people i used to go to church with to pick them so
    they would,nt go to waste.

  18. #18

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    Cissus is in the grape family. But, Vitis is the normal referred grape.

    Here is all of our wild Florida species in the Family. But, only the 6 species in the genus Vitis would be really considered grapes.

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  19. #19

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    I learned something new. Thank you Batch. I did a search on Cissus Trifoliata, and found out it has toxic levels of Oxalic Acid.

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