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Thread: Pressure canners?????

  1. #1
    Senior Member SARKY's Avatar
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    Default Pressure canners?????

    Does anyone use a pressure canner? If so what brand ? What is the best size and brand to get. I've only ever done hot water bath canning, so this is new to me. One other thing, I would like to be able to can half gallon mason jars.
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  2. #2

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    Well I guess I'll do a post after several months. There is no safe way to pressure can 1/2 gallon jars at home. I know it's been done, but.

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    Senior Member gryffynklm's Avatar
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    I have a presto 16qrt pressure canner and really like it.

    I use the 1/2 gallon jars for transporting soups, gravy, Apple pie (the sipping kind), to family get togethers.
    Just recently I have started to put up bulk dry goods like rice, beens and flour using a dry canning process. Basically you bake the dry food item in sterilized jars at 200˚F for a hour remove one jar at a time and secure the lid go to the next. Basically you are killing any bugs that would effect long term storage. I do the same sterilization for vacuum seal dry goods as well as storing dry goods for a week in the freezer before repacking to smaller containers.

    ***NOTE*** Oven canning has is not FDA tested or approved.
    http://aworkingpantry.blogspot.com/2...n-canning.html

    Below is from The National Center for Home Food Preservation
    http://nchfp.uga.edu/questions/FAQ_canning.html#16a

    What can I process in half-gallon canning jars?
    At least one canning jar manufacturer is selling half-gallon canning jars. That manufacturer has a printed note on the top that says half-gallon jars are only used for some highly acidic foods in a boiling water canner, with instructions to call a toll-free number for the instructions. When we last called, the only choices are grape juice and apple juice, as we also recommend.

    The only processes that USDA, the National Center for Home Food Preservation and the University of Georgia have to recommend for half-gallon jars are for very acidic fruit juices (and juice only): Apple Juice (http://www.homefoodpreservation.com/...ple_juice.html) and Grape Juice (http://www.homefoodpreservation.com/...ape_juice.html). This process time is not to be used for tomato juice, for example.

    There are no other research-tested processes for half-gallon jars. Boiling water processes for other foods for jars larger than those published with recipes (usually pints and/or quarts) cannot be extended by any formula to a larger jar.

    We are aware that there are historical recommendations for canning foods in half-gallon jars. However, these are not currently accepted or endorsed by the USDA, Cooperative Extension System or U.S. manufacturers of home canning jars.
    Last edited by gryffynklm; 09-07-2013 at 05:48 PM.
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Sarky - I use an All American. Specifically, I have the 21 quart:

    http://www.allamericancanner.com/all...surecanner.htm

    I chose it because it does not use a rubber seal which can go bad, it's made at the Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry here is the U.S. and their customer service is excellent. It also has both a weighted pressure gauge as well as an analog gauge. I can not help you with 1/2 gallon canning. I've never done it. If you have a real need for 1/2 gallon jars then I'd talk to the manufacturer of whatever brand you are interested in and see what they have to say. The 30 Quart All American is quite a bit taller than the one I have. However, mine is 14 inches on the inside. 1/2 gallon jars are 9.5 inches (I think) so even mine should be tall enough.

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    I bought the All American on Rick's recommendation 2 years ago.
    A most excellent recommendation. Thanks Rick. Nice construction.
    On the 1/2 gallon thing, I can't imagine how long you'd have to boil it to kill anything in the center of them. Do you have recipes that give times for something like that?

    One other thing, this canner weighs a good 15 to 20 pounds when loaded. It'll be fine on a sturdy gas range, but it stressed out my electric stove coil burner a little too much for my liking so I got one of those outdoor single burner camp ranges that works off a BBQ LP tank. Works great. It's just as easy to use out on the porch right outside the kitchen door as on the stove.
    The canner is too heavy for a glass top range.
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    That's an excellent point. We're getting ready to remodel the kitchen and replace the appliances. We have to go with the coil electric because of that very reason.

  7. #7

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    I have been wanting to get into some canning. And actually have a pressure cooker. Its an older one with the rubber gasket (not sure which brand- it just says Underwriters Laboratories and Brazil on the bottom) I'm sure I wouldn't use it-ever- just because I picked it up used and its been with me for at least 6 years unused. Anyways, what is the difference between a Pressure Cooker and a Canner? Ive done hot water canning in the past so I'm familiar with that but know that some things cant be canned that way. Thanks

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    You should not use your pressure cooker for low acid pressure canning. You need either gauge or weights to monitor pressure - many "cookers" do not have them, or are not designed to maintain the higher pressures needed for canning. Also - in this rare instance - size really does matter.
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Here is an excellent resource for home canning.

    http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_home.html

    Some information specific to canners from that site.

    http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/ug...s_canners.html

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    Lone Wolf COWBOYSURVIVAL's Avatar
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    On a recent rip home I inherited my Momaw's Pressure Canner. I t is an old National. I am trying to cypher whether or not it is worth rebuilding. I found some parts available. Any insight would be appreciated, I am brand new to this. I have only ever water bath canned.
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  11. #11

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    I just ordered the All American 921 21.5 quart.

    I love soups and could do with out all the salt in store bought soups. So, I'll be canning some soups soon.

    I have been doing water bath canning for a little while and really enjoy it.

  12. #12

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    imho when pressure canning you need a accurate gauge if the recipie calls for 15lbs pressure for 75,min
    then that,s what it is.canning is fun but also must be taken seriously. botulisim is no joke.never use a canner
    if you cannot make a good seal when closing always have a extra guage on hand and rubber gasket as well.
    i have a presto and a mirro pressure canner.always read the booklet tha comes with it and adhear to it.if any can
    for what ever reason does not seal when it has cooled put it in fridge and use next day.
    always make sure jar lids are dry nd clean when placing food in so as to get a good seal. your canners manual
    will explain all that.

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    Senior Member Phaedrus's Avatar
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    The All American is a great unit. I got one for my mom for Xmas last year or the year before.

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    Alaska, The Madness! 1stimestar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by COWBOYSURVIVAL View Post
    On a recent rip home I inherited my Momaw's Pressure Canner. I t is an old National. I am trying to cypher whether or not it is worth rebuilding. I found some parts available. Any insight would be appreciated, I am brand new to this. I have only ever water bath canned.
    Yes! It is worth it. If you decide you don't want to, send it to me and I will do it.
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  15. #15

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    Saving my scratch for an All American, I really would like to get into canning!! I wont ask many questions until I get the canner though... Maybe tax time!

    Whats a decent size, inexpensive All American for getting started not not looking for large output? Maybe something on the hobby level until I figure out what direction I ultimately want to go? I do anticipate Ill probably stay at the hobby level...

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I have the 21 quart. That's a bit misleading because it actually holds 21.5 quarts of liquid not jars. It holds 7 quart jars. If you have a large harvest and want to do a lot of canning then a larger canner might be better. Be sure to measure the distance between your stove vent or overhead cabinet and the stove top to make sure the canner you purchase will fit. You'll also need to use it on a gas stove or an electric with elements. Glass range tops won't support it.

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    Senior Member Winnie's Avatar
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    I just love my 16qt Presto. It holds 10 pint jars or 7 quarts. I've had it a few years now and use it a lot. As I don't can in large quantities, so it suits me fine and I've yet to replace the gasket. It was less than half price of the All American and does just as good a job. I reckon I'll be long dead before I've used the difference in price to buy any gaskets I might need.

    I also had to take into account import costs. If I had bought an All American I would have had to pay VAT an import charge and a post office handling charge.

    No we don't have them in UK!
    Last edited by Winnie; 12-21-2014 at 02:42 PM. Reason: 'splin
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    4 pints of split pea (the 5th one didn't have the head space. So, I ate it). And 10 pints of vegetable soup.

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    I think the split pea is great with no salt at all. I added a little more celery to the vegetable to off set the salt. I think the ham in the split pea added all the salt you need and I got the lowest salt ham you could get at the store.

    The All American has been put through its paces.
    Some questions for those who have experience. My instructions say to put the jars in the canner with about half of the jar full of water and the canner filled to a 2" or 3". What do you do when you are going to end up with two layers of pint jars in the canner?

    I just put the jars in the first layer and filled them and then put the second layer jars in and let them get to 180 degrees and then filled them.

    The canner and racks got discolored almost black. Is this a problem and should I do anything special to clean them? Out water is not generally considered hard water at all.

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    Senior Member Winnie's Avatar
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    Maybe Rick could answer the double stack question as mine isn't deep enough. The instructions for my canner recommend bit of vinegar in the water of the canner, seems to stop discolouring and limscale deposits on both the jars and canner.

    You might want to try Bicarbonate of Soda and some household soap to scrub off the residue.
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I'm not sure I'm following your question. I sterilize my jars in the canner but I submerse them completely. And whatever I'm canning to the jars and add lids and rings. I place the bottom stand in the canner, add my jars back in, add the second stand then the second layer of jars. I fill the canner with water, turn on the heat and allow the steam to escape, then add the weight. I'm not concerned about adding too much water to the canner. If there is 3-4 inches I'm okay with that. I just don't want to take a chance on too much water boiling out and exposing the jars.

    If I misunderstood your question, give me another shot at it.

    As to the discoloration that's because it's aluminum. The aluminum oxidizing. I don't worry about it. I clean my canner with steel wool afterwords. I understand you can add a couple of tablespoons of vinegar to the water to help with the staining but I've never done that.

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