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Thread: Very rough sand paper for a palm sander

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    Default Very rough sand paper for a palm sander

    Hi, I'm currently working on a project of mine. I'm using P60 grit sand paper for sand paper (on a palm sander*). However, it's not going through the wood fast enough. I was thinking of using thicker grit, P30 or less (would prefer less). However, in Lowes + Home Depot, that was not for sale. Also, I'm having a hard time finding it on Amazon.com.

    I found this listing where I can get some very gritty paper:
    http://www.aliexpress.com/store/prod...901259458.html

    But I'm don't know the site's operator or the vendor. Would anyone know of a reputable place where I can get below P30 grit sand paper for a palm sander?

    * - http://www.skilshop.com/factory-reco...map=7292-01-RT


  2. #2
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    IMO - and I'm not a wood worker - when hand sanding you will see very little difference between 30 grit and 60 grit. It may be more of a function of your sanding technique.
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    here is what lowes has 36, and 40 grit http://www.lowes.com/Search=sand+pap...%5B%5D=1z119ge
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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    IMO - and I'm not a wood worker - when hand sanding you will see very little difference between 30 grit and 60 grit. It may be more of a function of your sanding technique.
    *shrug* It's possible, but with 60 it's taking forever.

    If you have any suggestions that can improve my technique, feel free to share, I'm the first one here who wants this to go faster .

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by welderguy View Post
    here is what lowes has 36, and 40 grit http://www.lowes.com/Search=sand+pap...%5B%5D=1z119ge
    Gotcha. They didn't have that in the store. I'd still want to go lower, just in case (I have higher ratings and can use them as needed).

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yves View Post
    *shrug* It's possible, but with 60 it's taking forever.

    If you have any suggestions that can improve my technique, feel free to share, I'm the first one here who wants this to go faster .
    I used the word "may" since I have no idea what your project is, what type of wood you are sanding, and how you are doing it.
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    Senior Member gryffynklm's Avatar
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    If you explain your project perhaps show a photo it may help us understand what you are doing. Abetter understand might help us make recommendations.
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    How dry is the wood you're working with?
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    One step at a time intothenew's Avatar
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    As Crash said, you aren't going to see a lot of difference between 30 and 60 grit. If you need to remove that much wood on a flat surface then I suggest a plane or a planer. Hand planes are rather inexpensive. Of course you can purchase electric planes and planers as well. Sandpaper should be a near end process once you've worked the wood to the correct dimensions.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by gryffynklm View Post
    If you explain your project perhaps show a photo it may help us understand what you are doing. Abetter understand might help us make recommendations.
    Sure. I had this young tree that was felled by a strong storm we had in an area. I cut it up across in order to make coasters from it (so I can put my coffee on it). I don't know the type of the tree, but I live in Rhode Island (if that helps to exclude certain species based on geography) and I'm quite certain that this is not a harder tree like Oak (cutting it was very easy with my hand saw). The problem that I have is that when I made the cuts, you could see the scratches in the wood, which in my opinion are unsightly and I should just see the circles of the tree.

    What I'd like to do is to just remove a thin layer of the wood just to get rid of these slight imperfections and then make it very smooth with some sandpaper.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by pete lynch View Post
    How dry is the wood you're working with?
    It's very dry. Since I've cut up the trunk, it hasn't been green or moist for quite some time.

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    I'll second Rick's comments. A palm sander is usually used as a part of the finishing process for most woodworking projects (I own several for different applications and profiles). If you need to remove material uniformly, than a surface planer might be a better choice. If you're attempting to "shape" something, a wood rasp, gouge, chisel, hand planer or even a belt sander might be a better choice (don't rush it because belt sanders can remove material much faster than their palm sanding counterpart. With what little information you have provided, I can't offer much advice beyond these suggestions. Good luck with it!

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    As Crash said, you aren't going to see a lot of difference between 30 and 60 grit. If you need to remove that much wood on a flat surface then I suggest a plane or a planer. Hand planes are rather inexpensive. Of course you can purchase electric planes and planers as well. Sandpaper should be a near end process once you've worked the wood to the correct dimensions.
    I don't know. These coasters are never more than 4.5 inches across, so the size would make doing this quite difficult.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by intothenew View Post
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    I would if I could find a sheet of it with the same roughness . Making everything even after going through it with a file would not be easy.

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    Just saw your description. The work is probably too small for a surface planer. I would try a light belt sanding to remove saw marks and then move to a random orbital sander with progressively finer grit until you get the definition you're after. Again, good luck!
    Last edited by Cast-Iron; 07-20-2013 at 09:33 AM.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cast-Iron View Post
    Just saw your description. The work is probably too small for a surface planer. I would try a light belt sanding to remove saw marks and then move to a random orbital sander till you get the definition you're after. Again, good luck!
    Thanks. I don't have a belt sander. I'll figure something out .

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    How are you retaining the coaster when you sand them? How the coasters are held down will determine how much pressure you can apply to the sander.

    Make a jig to hold the coasters. Cut a piece of wood slightly thinner than the coasters with a circle just large enough for the coasters to fit then clamp the jig. This should give you some additional leverage on the hand sander.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    How are you retaining the coaster when you sand them? How the coasters are held down will determine how much pressure you can apply to the sander.

    Make a jig to hold the coasters. Cut a piece of wood slightly thinner than the coasters with a circle just large enough for the coasters to fit then clamp the jig. This should give you some additional leverage on the hand sander.
    Hold on, let me make a few pics.

  20. #20

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    This is the setup that I made (very roughly).

    In the second pic, you can see the coaster and the scratches across it that I don't like.
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