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Thread: abandoned cabins in alaska

  1. #41
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    Meh, I also agree that a little razzing never really hurts, if you're truly open to learning. Even if that means learning (and accepting) that what you think life alone in the wilderness isn't the utopia you've built it up in your mind as.

    I think if you stick around Grandmasusan, you'll agree. And you'll likely find yourself getting along quite well with the old boys club here.

    I on the other hand will probably never "click" to that degree as I've got limited experience, knowledge and a finer focused area of interests. So i hover and read and learn and generally don't speak out much.


  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by grandmasusan View Post
    I was born in Alaska, drove sled dogs, we used a fish wheel, lived 20 miles from the nearest small town. My mother and 2 brothers still live there. Mom is in assisted living now, but the brothers still live subsistence on land around Sutton. They were there 2 years without electricity. Now there is electricity, but still no well. I lived on Knik River in an unfinished house (but it had electricity and water and septic) , in the middle of bear and wolf country. At the time, I was 22 years old with 3 babies. I had a couple of dogs who pulled sled and for ski-jouring, goats for milk, a large garden, and a lot of loneliness. Don't believe all the bull**** you hear on this post. My best friends growing up with eskimo people from the interior (I am not, I am caucasian, but culturally Alaskan indian). Remember, that one survival skill is learning to discern the motive of people. I've found most white people in remote locations are more dangerous/intentionally harmful than animals. ' Course, I haven't been living in polar bear or grizzly country. Don't put yourself in harm's way. And if you find that hanging out in a community of ego-centric, sarcastic and rude types that call themselves survivor experts is unsupportive, then go find a community of kind people who will help you heal from the dark side of humanity, will share tips and tricks of their trades, will help you learn about how TO survive difficult climates and will help you understand safety, tools, techniques, animal psychology (wild and domestic), food preservation, clothing construction, medicinal herbal treatments, construction techniquest etc. etc. etc. Skills can be learned. Your intention, your heart, and your desires...those are harder to train, yet are key factors in determining who to trust and follow. As in surviving in the wilderness, preparedness and key tools and knowledge/skills are required, and timing (seasons) -- same goes for community living but the skills are different and have more to do with having good boundaries and understanding the culture of the people you are in contact so you can speak their language and live peaceably without offending. Brute force is not the right language for long term survival, and certainly not for a life of peace / harmony. I'll soon be making some decisions about whether this forum is one that I will find helpful, or just combative and condescending. Don't take bull****...or in other words, consider all things, and hold them in a neutral space until you learn enough about context and reality, to know what the truth is (for you).
    Let me see if I understand you right. Your saying we should encourage everyone that says they want to live in the most remote areas of the world with nothing, possible sending them to there deaths? If a person is serious about there desires, then they would post a detail Bio about there experience, there knowledge, and exactly what they want out of the experience they seek. To come on a forum and just say Hi i'm looking for an abandoned cabin i can live in is very vague and leaves a lot of room for some not too serious answers.
    Maybe I am different, but before I started Diving, I read, studied and took class's so i knew what to expect and what do to, would I have lived thru my first dive had I just threw on a tank and jumped in the water, Maybe? who knows, I just know my life is too important to me and several other people to just go recklessly into something. I personnel refuse to aide or encourage possible life threatening behavior. If your ok with doing , good for you. as for me I never will. Keep in mind even Experts and seasoned veterans fail and die.
    There is a huge difference in being born into something and jumping into the unknown.
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  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oddmott View Post
    Meh, I also agree that a little razzing never really hurts, if you're truly open to learning. Even if that means learning (and accepting) that what you think life alone in the wilderness isn't the utopia you've built it up in your mind as.

    I think if you stick around Grandmasusan, you'll agree. And you'll likely find yourself getting along quite well with the old boys club here.

    I on the other hand will probably never "click" to that degree as I've got limited experience, knowledge and a finer focused area of interests. So i hover and read and learn and generally don't speak out much.
    One key to this forum and how certain questions are replied too is, search for that subject and see what prior replies were. Most "Im running off to the wilds to live forever" threads are taken as a joke and the replies reflect that. And having a dream of living off grid in a remote area is great , if your prepared and have the proper knowledge and skills.
    I Wonder Who was the first person to look at a cow and say, "I think I'll squeeze these dangly things here, and drink what ever comes out?"

  4. #44
    Alaska, The Madness! 1stimestar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grandmasusan View Post
    I was born in Alaska, drove sled dogs, we used a fish wheel, lived 20 miles from the nearest small town. My mother and 2 brothers still live there. Mom is in assisted living now, but the brothers still live subsistence on land around Sutton. They were there 2 years without electricity. Now there is electricity, but still no well. I lived on Knik River in an unfinished house (but it had electricity and water and septic) , in the middle of bear and wolf country. At the time, I was 22 years old with 3 babies. I had a couple of dogs who pulled sled and for ski-jouring, goats for milk, a large garden, and a lot of loneliness. Don't believe all the bull**** you hear on this post. My best friends growing up with eskimo people from the interior (I am not, I am caucasian, but culturally Alaskan indian). Remember, that one survival skill is learning to discern the motive of people. I've found most white people in remote locations are more dangerous/intentionally harmful than animals. ' Course, I haven't been living in polar bear or grizzly country. Don't put yourself in harm's way. And if you find that hanging out in a community of ego-centric, sarcastic and rude types that call themselves survivor experts is unsupportive, then go find a community of kind people who will help you heal from the dark side of humanity, will share tips and tricks of their trades, will help you learn about how TO survive difficult climates and will help you understand safety, tools, techniques, animal psychology (wild and domestic), food preservation, clothing construction, medicinal herbal treatments, construction techniquest etc. etc. etc. Skills can be learned. Your intention, your heart, and your desires...those are harder to train, yet are key factors in determining who to trust and follow. As in surviving in the wilderness, preparedness and key tools and knowledge/skills are required, and timing (seasons) -- same goes for community living but the skills are different and have more to do with having good boundaries and understanding the culture of the people you are in contact so you can speak their language and live peaceably without offending. Brute force is not the right language for long term survival, and certainly not for a life of peace / harmony. I'll soon be making some decisions about whether this forum is one that I will find helpful, or just combative and condescending. Don't take bull****...or in other words, consider all things, and hold them in a neutral space until you learn enough about context and reality, to know what the truth is (for you).
    Sorry, I only have a few minutes of internet but want to reply to this before I leave. I haven't read the remainder of this post yet. If you were talking about what I said, I would like to point out that the op didn't say he wanted to come up here and learn skills and gain knowledge. He said he wanted to come up here and squat on someone else's property and live off the land. No paying money, no paying dues, no learning how. I am not ego centric though I do admit to being sarcastic and even occasionally rude. But for someone who says they want to learn how to move out into the wilderness and live off the land, I'd be happy to help. But I'm not helping someone kill themselves, on someone else's land...
    Why do I live in Alaska? Because I can.

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  5. #45

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    Yes, thanks for your feedback and explanations. Helps with my clarity to understand your methods and motives a little more. I have to agree with your cautionary approach -- there is a level of difficulty and risk with subsistence living, that puts the odds against survival for a loner and make the odds for survival (not to mention enjoyment) very very low for an unskilled untrained person attempting it alone. So you advise wisely.

    I especially love the statement, "Why do I live in Alaska? Because I can." There is something to that, ...it is in the bones, in the tissues, in the connection with the earth, in the ecosystem, in the pride, and something about the difficulty of it and the ability to make it from season to season...it becomes identity, becomes "who I am"...or for me...who I was. Brings up emotions to remember my mother land with the struggles and rugged determination - the feelings of power & ability yet nothingness, the electromagnetic energy of the land, and literally the love I would feel pouring out upon a land (not knowing from whence it came) while knowing that lack of preparation could extinguish the life of me or us...particularly "me" if I ventured out too far without protection or preparation, and sometimes even when prepared, things go wrong. And then there is everything that goes right -- what wonderful memories I have. But realistically, it is hard, and anybody attempting something like that should try living off the land in a kinder climate first to realize the workload, then it becomes practical to notch it up to a shorter harvest season and less supportive environment. Just one opinion. :^) thanks.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by grandmasusan View Post
    Yes, thanks for your feedback and explanations. Helps with my clarity to understand your methods and motives a little more. I have to agree with your cautionary approach -- there is a level of difficulty and risk with subsistence living, that puts the odds against survival for a loner and make the odds for survival (not to mention enjoyment) very very low for an unskilled untrained person attempting it alone. So you advise wisely.

    I especially love the statement, "Why do I live in Alaska? Because I can." There is something to that, ...it is in the bones, in the tissues, in the connection with the earth, in the ecosystem, in the pride, and something about the difficulty of it and the ability to make it from season to season...it becomes identity, becomes "who I am"...or for me...who I was. Brings up emotions to remember my mother land with the struggles and rugged determination - the feelings of power & ability yet nothingness, the electromagnetic energy of the land, and literally the love I would feel pouring out upon a land (not knowing from whence it came) while knowing that lack of preparation could extinguish the life of me or us...particularly "me" if I ventured out too far without protection or preparation, and sometimes even when prepared, things go wrong. And then there is everything that goes right -- what wonderful memories I have. But realistically, it is hard, and anybody attempting something like that should try living off the land in a kinder climate first to realize the workload, then it becomes practical to notch it up to a shorter harvest season and less supportive environment. Just one opinion. :^) thanks.
    That's all well and good.....remember the OP stated that he was looking for abandoned cabins to use free, or a very low cost.

    That generally means squatting and trespassing......or at least doing your research on what's available, when, where, how.....If ya get my drift

    Have had my "abandon" cabin broke into a couple of times....and have no use for those starry eyed dreamers that think they can take their ego ride on my dime.
    Very hard sometimes to give a straight and serious answer.
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    All on top of the fact it sounds like a mod traced the IP to the Middle East, which is why I asked Ex-pat, soldier or native.
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    'Zactly...

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    Quote Originally Posted by grandmasusan View Post
    Yes, thanks for your feedback and explanations. Helps with my clarity to understand your methods and motives a little more. I have to agree with your cautionary approach -- there is a level of difficulty and risk with subsistence living, that puts the odds against survival for a loner and make the odds for survival (not to mention enjoyment) very very low for an unskilled untrained person attempting it alone. So you advise wisely.

    I especially love the statement, "Why do I live in Alaska? Because I can." There is something to that, ...it is in the bones, in the tissues, in the connection with the earth, in the ecosystem, in the pride, and something about the difficulty of it and the ability to make it from season to season...it becomes identity, becomes "who I am"...or for me...who I was. Brings up emotions to remember my mother land with the struggles and rugged determination - the feelings of power & ability yet nothingness, the electromagnetic energy of the land, and literally the love I would feel pouring out upon a land (not knowing from whence it came) while knowing that lack of preparation could extinguish the life of me or us...particularly "me" if I ventured out too far without protection or preparation, and sometimes even when prepared, things go wrong. And then there is everything that goes right -- what wonderful memories I have. But realistically, it is hard, and anybody attempting something like that should try living off the land in a kinder climate first to realize the workload, then it becomes practical to notch it up to a shorter harvest season and less supportive environment. Just one opinion. :^) thanks.
    I'm glad you got it. I just got back from a week long trip and just playing catch up.
    Why do I live in Alaska? Because I can.

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    Lately there are shows like life below zero and mountain men for example, they show men leave their home to go to the hunting cabin and some of them have line shacks on top of that. My question is this, do these men own ALL the cabins they are using and also the land they are trapping/hunting? My guess is probably not, but it does make one think there are cabins waiting to be occupied with only surviving to worry about.

  12. #52
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    Heh, I'm supposed to be on Life Below Zero next week. You can also read my blog about my trip up to visit my friend Susan.
    Why do I live in Alaska? Because I can.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shiftyer1 View Post
    Lately there are shows like life below zero and mountain men for example, they show men leave their home to go to the hunting cabin and some of them have line shacks on top of that. My question is this, do these men own ALL the cabins they are using and also the land they are trapping/hunting? My guess is probably not, but it does make one think there are cabins waiting to be occupied with only surviving to worry about.
    I would imagine that the trapping/hunting cabins of yesteryear that were built on "public" land served their purposes well. They offered shelter and a supply point of sorts. They were intended to be used, not taken. Most have long since been returned to the earth.

    Alaska is a different animal than the lower 48. Here is something interesting that I found regarding remote recreational cabin sites in Alaska. http://dnr.alaska.gov/mlw/factsht/remote_cabins.pdf
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1stimestar View Post
    Heh, I'm supposed to be on Life Below Zero next week. You can also read my blog about my trip up to visit my friend Susan.
    Hope I can catch the show here--about time you appeared on something.
    As always, I'll enjoy reading your blog.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    I would imagine that the trapping/hunting cabins of yesteryear that were built on "public" land served their purposes well. They offered shelter and a supply point of sorts. They were intended to be used, not taken. Most have long since been returned to the earth.

    Alaska is a different animal than the lower 48. Here is something interesting that I found regarding remote recreational cabin sites in Alaska. http://dnr.alaska.gov/mlw/factsht/remote_cabins.pdf
    That's interesting, and reading it over still requires permits, applications and fee's.
    Thanks nice find.
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  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by grandmasusan View Post
    ...
    I especially love the statement, "Why do I live in Alaska? Because I can." There is something to that, ...it is in the bones, in the tissues, in the connection with the earth, in the ecosystem, in the pride, and something about the difficulty of it and the ability to make it from season to season...it becomes identity, becomes "who I am"...or for me...who I was. Brings up emotions to remember my mother land with the struggles and rugged determination - the feelings of power & ability yet nothingness, the electromagnetic energy of the land, and literally the love I would feel pouring out upon a land (not knowing from whence it came) while knowing that lack of preparation could extinguish the life of me or us...particularly "me" if I ventured out too far without protection or preparation, and sometimes even when prepared, things go wrong. And then there is everything that goes right -- what wonderful memories I have. But realistically, it is hard, and anybody attempting something like that should try living off the land in a kinder climate first to realize the workload, then it becomes practical to notch it up to a shorter harvest season and less supportive environment. Just one opinion. :^) thanks.
    Well too bad she never came back.

    Quote Originally Posted by BENESSE View Post
    Hope I can catch the show here--about time you appeared on something.
    As always, I'll enjoy reading your blog.
    Stupid seasons hahhaa. They filmed me when I took Susan out to celebrate the night she bought Kavik River Camp. The season ended right after she walked out of the office of signing the paper work for it. Literally a couple of hours difference. So hopefully it will be on the first episode of next season but we'll have to wait and see.
    Why do I live in Alaska? Because I can.

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    I have been fortunate to spend a lot of time in Alaska this year. In the past several months (just got home last week) I have been in Kaktovik, Yukon Village, Prudhoe Bay, Fairbanks, Healy, Denali Park, Kantishna, Talkeetna, Trapper Creek, Anchorage, Kodiak Island, Afognak Island, Whittier and all points in between. Plus extended stays in ANWR and Frazer Lake in the Kodiak Refuge. It was great, and I saw a lot of old cabins that would work for you.

    My advice...make some contacts on-line in some of the areas your interested in. In villages like Kaktovik, Yukon Village, Arctic Village, Eagle etc..there are people who live in these tiny towns and then run trap lines and spend extended periods in the bush. Talk to them online and get their advice. If that doesn't work. Book your flights and just show up in a little village in the summer and camp outside of town until you make contacts. People there will go out of their way to help you, and will most likely even set you up in a cabin in town (labor trade for rent) until you develop the knowledge and skill to get out into the bush. Plus, these folks will probably even change your mind on humans! (lots of good people in these communities). Don't get discouraged by what you read on here. You can make the life you want out there, you just have to get up there and really try. Good luck!
    The way of the canoe is the way of the wilderness and of a freedom almost forgotten- Sigurd Olson

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  18. #58
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    Hey, Dogman. Good to see you back!! Glad your trip was a safe one.

  19. #59
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    Hey Dogman, wondered where you went. You should have given me a heads up you were coming to Fairbanks. I would have bought you lunch. What were you doing all over the place?
    Why do I live in Alaska? Because I can.

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    I was working up there. Guiding for a month, and then working on an upcoming Nat Geo tv show about bears...I am going to be up there again for 6-8 weeks next summer too, will have to look you up.
    The way of the canoe is the way of the wilderness and of a freedom almost forgotten- Sigurd Olson

    Give me winter, give me dogs... you can keep the rest- Knud Rasmussen

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