Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 67

Thread: abandoned cabins in alaska

  1. #21

    Default

    thenks for the understanding and help...ive worked hard everyday of my life for allmost nothing but i never complained..and yes ' sometimes i have problems to explain myself...but it allways warm my hart when people just hear you and try to help you without sarkasm.
    well..people-allways remaind me why i want to get as far away from them
    Last edited by nirz; 07-14-2013 at 12:16 PM.


  2. #22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nirz View Post
    thenks for the uderstanding and help...ive worked hard everyday in my life for allmost nothing but i never complained..and yes ' sometimes i have problems to explain myself...but it always warm my hart when people just hear you and try to help you without sarkasm.
    well..people-allways remaind me why i want to get as far away from them
    I do have to comment on one point, you say you want as far away from people as possible, and why, but It seems you need people in your life, if you didnt , you won't be asking us for advice, or being offended by the jokes, or sarcasm . Its a contradictory statement my friend.
    I Wonder Who was the first person to look at a cow and say, "I think I'll squeeze these dangly things here, and drink what ever comes out?"

  3. #23
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    43,061
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    @ Nirz ---- what is your background and how old are you?
    Can't Means Won't

    My Youtube Channel

  4. #24
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    699

    Default

    Nirz, from what I have read here in this thread, I get the feeling you are ill prepared for the situation you seek. Having lived and worked in many remote Alaskan communities, I can say this from personal experience. Alaska is largely still a frontier, hence the name "Last Frontier". It's largest city, Anchorage, even has a year round bear and moose population. Either species quite capable of dispatching an annoying greenhorn who finds himself in their element. It is also an expensive proposition just to reach many remote bush communities. If you show up with no clue and no money you really are more of a liability than an asset. There are still land programs available to bonafide residents. Don't expect to show up and immediately qualify for it (the homesteading program ended back in the 1980's if I'm not mistaken). If you want an opportunity to live in the bush far away from the annoyances of civilization you might consider looking for employment with a outfitter. Someone to tend to the camp and customers in season, and a caretaker in the off-season. After you cut your teeth so to speak, you would have a better idea about what that lifestyle is all about. Remember, the first rule in survival is not dying!

  5. #25
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    43,061
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I guess I should add......

    How do you plan on traveling to Alaska from the Middle East if you have no/not much money?
    Can't Means Won't

    My Youtube Channel

  6. #26
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Chugach National Forest
    Posts
    9,795
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    I may be of some help.........are you

    a.) Male or
    b.) Female or
    c.) Not sure.........???

    if your answer is "b" please submit a video of you disassembling your largest chainsaw, and re-assembling it.

    Ps. I was Homesteading on Lake Clark when Dick P. was still in the Twin Lakes country. Met him twice.
    Last edited by Sourdough; 07-14-2013 at 01:37 PM.

  7. #27
    Alaska, The Madness! 1stimestar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Little cabin in the woods, middle of Alaska.
    Posts
    5,120
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Abandoned cabins do not last long up here. They quickly revert back to nature with our weather extremes. That is, unless they are squatter cabins, in which case they are burned down by Rangers. How do you plan on getting there. Anywhere that you could just move in without someone noticing would be off the road system. How do you plan on heating during the winter? Oh wood heat you say? So that means a chain saw which means fuel. Do you know how to rebuild or even sharpen a chain saw? Do you know how many fish it takes to get one through the winter? Yes you can dry them. That draws bears. Do you have a gun big enough to protect you from bears? Do you have a fishing license? What about a hunting license? Oh yea, you can't hunt bears for the first year here without also hiring a licensed guide. We got tired of our tourist getting munched on by bears... It's a big state with different climate zones. Which part of the state were you looking at?
    In other words, good luck with that.
    Why do I live in Alaska? Because I can.

    Alaska, the Madness! Bloggity Stories of the North Country

    "Building Codes, Alaskans don't need no stinking Building Codes." Sourdough

    Yes, I have wifi in my outhouse!

  8. #28

    Default

    Now that ^ was the post I was hoping for Star.

    So the OP is in the Middle East? A US expat, US soldier, or native?
    If we are to have another contest in…our national existence I predict that the dividing line will not be Mason and Dixon's, but between patriotism & intelligence on the one side, and superstition, ambition & ignorance on the other…
    ~ President Ulysses S. Grant

  9. #29

    Default

    If I remember correctly, Dick Proenneke moved to Alaska in 1950-51 and lived and worked on Kodiak Island for 17 years before he moved to Twin Lakes.
    The same sorta thing as the plan suggested by Cast-Iron.
    Wilderness Survival:
    Surviving a temporary situation where you're lost in the wilderness

  10. #30
    Tracker Beo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio (Dunlap's Station)
    Posts
    4,008
    Blog Entries
    57

    Default

    Personally I think this desert dwelling goof is full of $hite, he's not traveling to Alaska to live remotely any more than I'm traveling over there to live a solitude life among people that hate Americans (but for money I will go hunt them, I'm just saying). He has no wilderness (forest) experience and desert survival will hold him till he's going goo goo over a Kodiak and it eats him. This is a waste of internet space.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

  11. #31

    Default

    Washington state still has a homestead program, and the conditions would be kinder.still no power,you could survive the first wi in a well built yurt,which you can acquire a mongolian yurt for about 3000. acquire two good dogs. Too easy for cougar to take down one. But then you have moremouths to feed. People havedone it. Keep trying,you willl find a way to peace. Homesteading is always dangerous alone. Can youfind even one other person you can do this with? A yes answer might make a life or death difference. Remember, it has been done successfully, but not often alone.

  12. #32

    Default

    I didn't know homestead programs still existed! I would love to live in Washington State, too, so beautiful there.

    Quote Originally Posted by grandmasusan View Post
    Washington state still has a homestead program, and the conditions would be kinder.still no power,you could survive the first wi in a well built yurt,which you can acquire a mongolian yurt for about 3000. acquire two good dogs. Too easy for cougar to take down one. But then you have moremouths to feed. People havedone it. Keep trying,you willl find a way to peace. Homesteading is always dangerous alone. Can youfind even one other person you can do this with? A yes answer might make a life or death difference. Remember, it has been done successfully, but not often alone.

  13. #33
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Amen to that.

  14. #34
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    56,179

    Default

    I think the current homestead law is to protect your primary home. Most states have a homestead law but it's not the same definition as we're talking about here.

    http://www.atg.wa.gov/AGOOpinions/op...6#.UeQj2dKThMI

    http://apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=6.13

  15. #35
    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    The People's Republic of Illinois
    Posts
    9,449
    Blog Entries
    38

    Cool +1!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I think the current homestead law is to protect your primary home. Most states have a homestead law but it's not the same definition as we're talking about here.

    http://www.atg.wa.gov/AGOOpinions/op...6#.UeQj2dKThMI

    http://apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=6.13
    Yeah, talk to a lawyer 1st. ....
    SARGE
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."
    Albert Einstein

    Proud father of a US Marine....SEMPER FI!

    They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    Benjamin Franklin

  16. #36

    Default

    They are right. Things have changed. Just discovered it ended in 1976.
    But I might have a piece of property you can borrow for awhile, not a lifetime. PM me.

  17. #37
    Senior Member Canoetripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Panama city Fl
    Posts
    226

    Default

    I
    have some woods behind my house
    you could live there! It would fun!
    You can live on dandelions and rabbit.
    The bay is close by saltwater fishing at it's best.
    I'll even loan you a fishing rod!
    the only problem is it's 2500 miles away
    from Alaska. Why don;t you come here and try
    to live the life you seek first and IF you survive
    here then move to Alaska! IF you don't or can't
    survive here you WILL DIE IN ALASKA!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Just shoot me a PM and we'll work out the details.
    PS Alaska does not forgive is not user friendly.

  18. #38
    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    tip of the mitt
    Posts
    4,955

    Default

    I'm not the OP but I would die in that heat.

  19. #39

    Default

    I was born in Alaska, drove sled dogs, we used a fish wheel, lived 20 miles from the nearest small town. My mother and 2 brothers still live there. Mom is in assisted living now, but the brothers still live subsistence on land around Sutton. They were there 2 years without electricity. Now there is electricity, but still no well. I lived on Knik River in an unfinished house (but it had electricity and water and septic) , in the middle of bear and wolf country. At the time, I was 22 years old with 3 babies. I had a couple of dogs who pulled sled and for ski-jouring, goats for milk, a large garden, and a lot of loneliness. Don't believe all the bull**** you hear on this post. My best friends growing up with eskimo people from the interior (I am not, I am caucasian, but culturally Alaskan indian). Remember, that one survival skill is learning to discern the motive of people. I've found most white people in remote locations are more dangerous/intentionally harmful than animals. ' Course, I haven't been living in polar bear or grizzly country. Don't put yourself in harm's way. And if you find that hanging out in a community of ego-centric, sarcastic and rude types that call themselves survivor experts is unsupportive, then go find a community of kind people who will help you heal from the dark side of humanity, will share tips and tricks of their trades, will help you learn about how TO survive difficult climates and will help you understand safety, tools, techniques, animal psychology (wild and domestic), food preservation, clothing construction, medicinal herbal treatments, construction techniquest etc. etc. etc. Skills can be learned. Your intention, your heart, and your desires...those are harder to train, yet are key factors in determining who to trust and follow. As in surviving in the wilderness, preparedness and key tools and knowledge/skills are required, and timing (seasons) -- same goes for community living but the skills are different and have more to do with having good boundaries and understanding the culture of the people you are in contact so you can speak their language and live peaceably without offending. Brute force is not the right language for long term survival, and certainly not for a life of peace / harmony. I'll soon be making some decisions about whether this forum is one that I will find helpful, or just combative and condescending. Don't take bull****...or in other words, consider all things, and hold them in a neutral space until you learn enough about context and reality, to know what the truth is (for you).

  20. #40

    Default

    Gosh I don't know how you did it!! I agree with you on the importance of a supportive community to help one another build skills. I think it's so important to lean on each other. Unfortunately, my own experience with this has left me cynical because I've had people take advantage. I think there are a lot of newbies who are overconfident and are starry-eyed about how great the subsistence life is and are blind to all the hard work and skill that must go into such a lifestyle. I know I was at first. After doing plenty of research I learned real quick just how much I didn't know. So I think a little razzing from the group is in order, simply to weed out those who are serious about the life.



    Quote Originally Posted by grandmasusan View Post
    I was born in Alaska, drove sled dogs, we used a fish wheel, lived 20 miles from the nearest small town. My mother and 2 brothers still live there. Mom is in assisted living now, but the brothers still live subsistence on land around Sutton. They were there 2 years without electricity. Now there is electricity, but still no well. I lived on Knik River in an unfinished house (but it had electricity and water and septic) , in the middle of bear and wolf country. At the time, I was 22 years old with 3 babies. I had a couple of dogs who pulled sled and for ski-jouring, goats for milk, a large garden, and a lot of loneliness. Don't believe all the bull**** you hear on this post. My best friends growing up with eskimo people from the interior (I am not, I am caucasian, but culturally Alaskan indian). Remember, that one survival skill is learning to discern the motive of people. I've found most white people in remote locations are more dangerous/intentionally harmful than animals. ' Course, I haven't been living in polar bear or grizzly country. Don't put yourself in harm's way. And if you find that hanging out in a community of ego-centric, sarcastic and rude types that call themselves survivor experts is unsupportive, then go find a community of kind people who will help you heal from the dark side of humanity, will share tips and tricks of their trades, will help you learn about how TO survive difficult climates and will help you understand safety, tools, techniques, animal psychology (wild and domestic), food preservation, clothing construction, medicinal herbal treatments, construction techniquest etc. etc. etc. Skills can be learned. Your intention, your heart, and your desires...those are harder to train, yet are key factors in determining who to trust and follow. As in surviving in the wilderness, preparedness and key tools and knowledge/skills are required, and timing (seasons) -- same goes for community living but the skills are different and have more to do with having good boundaries and understanding the culture of the people you are in contact so you can speak their language and live peaceably without offending. Brute force is not the right language for long term survival, and certainly not for a life of peace / harmony. I'll soon be making some decisions about whether this forum is one that I will find helpful, or just combative and condescending. Don't take bull****...or in other words, consider all things, and hold them in a neutral space until you learn enough about context and reality, to know what the truth is (for you).

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •