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Thread: Pine Rosin Fried Sweet Taters

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    Senior Member erunkiswldrnssurvival's Avatar
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    Default Pine Rosin Fried Sweet Taters

    I have been looking for some cool ways to use and eat pine sap. this video i found on you tube demonstrates how to fry sweet potatoes in pine sap.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpfHhK5sWrg

    I am going to try to cook my own and see what happens, shouldnt be much different than grease. its a great idea, and the sap tastes good.
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    Senior Member erunkiswldrnssurvival's Avatar
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    then I may try to make some arrow heads with pine sap
    God lives in the Mountain, Serve the Master, The Mountain also serves the Master. Serve the Mountain,
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    Senior Member erunkiswldrnssurvival's Avatar
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    oh boy Richard Simons in the woods! mabe thats why the guy cooking potatoes was wearing coveralls........
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    Senior Member bulrush's Avatar
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    Some friends got me to taste some dried pine sap and it was awful. Perhaps it was because it was from a jack pine.

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    Senior Member erunkiswldrnssurvival's Avatar
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    red pine tastes the best. spruce is real good too. the jack pine has very dark bitter sap. i have been fortunate to taste dozens of different pine saps, i like them all.
    Last edited by erunkiswldrnssurvival; 05-05-2009 at 10:51 AM.
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    Senior Member gryffynklm's Avatar
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    Erunkis,
    Are you suggesting that the pine sap is consumed? Have you eaten pine sap in this way? I have tasted it ( when I was a Kid and found it tasted like turpentine, Hmmm I wonder why? Perhaps the volatiles were not sufficiently cooked off or prepared correctly. I didn't like it.

    I've had idaho potatoes from Cracker Barrel that have been cooked in pine sap or pitch then wrapped in a paper. It added some flavor to the potato flesh and was a slight hint of pine. Not bad.
    Karl

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    Senior Member erunkiswldrnssurvival's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gryffynklm View Post
    Erunkis,
    Are you suggesting that the pine sap is consumed? Have you eaten pine sap in this way? I have tasted it ( when I was a Kid and found it tasted like turpentine, Hmmm I wonder why? Perhaps the volatiles were not sufficiently cooked off or prepared correctly. I didn't like it.

    I've had idaho potatoes from Cracker Barrel that have been cooked in pine sap or pitch then wrapped in a paper. It added some flavor to the potato flesh and was a slight hint of pine. Not bad.
    yes i am saying that pine sap can be eaten with most foods,long slow cooking removes the volitles. the red pine is sweet and flavorful. they grow in the north east and canada. spruce and white pine are a little more bitter and have less flavor than red pine. try different kinds to see what you like. i make chewing gum with sap. honey and bees wax boiled into pine sap, makes an exelent chew that tastes very good.
    God lives in the Mountain, Serve the Master, The Mountain also serves the Master. Serve the Mountain,
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    one wolf
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    Quote Originally Posted by erunkiswldrnssurvival View Post
    then I may try to make some arrow heads with pine sap
    Hope thats just for a novelty... dont think that they are stong enough to effectivly dispatch game

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    Senior Member gryffynklm's Avatar
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    Thanks, I'll have to experiment when time allows. I have several pines on my property. I'll have to identify the species. Considering the uses you have pointed out, they could be a good resource.
    Karl

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    Senior Member erunkiswldrnssurvival's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1wolf View Post
    Hope thats just for a novelty... dont think that they are stong enough to effectivly dispatch game
    i use pine resin to anchor the arrow head into the shaft and also to glue the lashings. permenantly locking the parts togather. i meant to "lash" arrow heads. sorry for the typo
    Last edited by erunkiswldrnssurvival; 05-05-2009 at 05:56 PM.
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    Senior Member erunkiswldrnssurvival's Avatar
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    Tha red pine has a very unique smell and flavor. its my favorite of pine saps to eat. spruce is less aromatic and has a duller more bitter flavor. spruce is second best to the red pine as a food. though all pine saps are extreemly flameable,they are not equal in smell and flavor. each species of pine is unique.
    God lives in the Mountain, Serve the Master, The Mountain also serves the Master. Serve the Mountain,
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  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by erunkiswldrnssurvival View Post
    I have been looking for some cool ways to use and eat pine sap. this video i found on you tube demonstrates how to fry sweet potatoes in pine sap.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpfHhK5sWrg

    I am going to try to cook my own and see what happens, shouldnt be much different than grease. its a great idea, and the sap tastes good.

    I grew up on Rosin potatoes, they were a regular part of grilling, and I think you misunderstand what they are doing.

    You DO NOT eat the rosin. Yes, you may, but that is not what is intended.

    You take a potato sweet or regular and drop it into the rosin unpeeled. This is done after the rosin is already hot. You use the rosin to seel the moisture in the potato while it cooks. When the potato is done, you pull it out cut it in half like a baked potato and eat it. The intent is not to eat the skin and rosin. The great thing it does to the potatoes is seal them and you have very moist, perfectly cooked taters.

    I'm not arguing that you can or can't eat the rosin. I am telling you that is not the intent. Try it sometime. There are even restaraunt supply houses that sell rosin for this purpose.

    Here is a quick recipe:

    In a cast iron kettle (or rosin cooker) put 2 to 5 pounds raw rosin and
    bring to boil. Scrub potatoes completely. Idaho Bakers are preferred. Drop
    in potatoes. When done, they come to the top. Remove with tongs and wrap in
    5 or 6 thicknesses of newspaper. Roll up and twist each end. To serve,
    slice open newspaper and potato together with a sharp knife. Be careful,
    overheated rosin could possibly combust and burn.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    There is something about my dinner igniting that's makes me NOT want to try this. When I'm ready to eat, I'm ready to eat. Not fight a fire. But, hey, that's just me.

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    Senior Member erunkiswldrnssurvival's Avatar
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    in the video the guy was using a litte tiny fire and a great big kettle. it frys good just like grease. the perfect temp for taters is 365 degrees.
    God lives in the Mountain, Serve the Master, The Mountain also serves the Master. Serve the Mountain,
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    Eating pine rosin probably explains the constipation. It sort of sets up when it cools down.

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    Senior Member erunkiswldrnssurvival's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Eating pine rosin probably explains the constipation. It sort of sets up when it cools down.

    the sap does leave a thin shell of sap on tater, kind of like a carmel apple. and it tastes good. (dont forget to eat your roughage)
    God lives in the Mountain, Serve the Master, The Mountain also serves the Master. Serve the Mountain,
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  18. #18

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    Because this is a thread about pine sap, just wanted to post a quick easy way to get the stuff off of your fingers:

    Cooking spray (vegetable oil should work too)
    Soap
    Water

    Put a little of all three on the area where the sap is (obviously) and scrub for thirty seconds or so. Once you rinse it off you should be sap-free.

  19. #19
    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    Avon skin so soft works well but my old standby is kerosene.

    I wanted to add that in my world red pine is called Norway pine.
    Last edited by randyt; 03-10-2014 at 06:17 PM. Reason: added text
    so the definition of a criminal is someone who breaks the law and you want me to believe that somehow more laws make less criminals?

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