Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Double dozen plants that will kill you .

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Nprthern Indiana
    Posts
    32

    Default Double dozen plants that will kill you .

    Here are the deadly two dozen from Petersons " Edible Wild Plants " .
    Over a hundred poison listed but these are the ones with confirmed fatalities . Worth noting that some of them have edible portions but also poison like .....Black Locust , Pokeweed , Common Tansey and Wild Cherry .

    Im trying to memorize these and also photograph them so they will burn in my memory . Admittedly there are two funghi , Ergot and Mushrooms .




    American Yew
    Azalea
    Bane berries
    Black Locust
    Canada Moonseed
    Castor Bean
    Common Tansey
    Ergot
    False Hellebore
    Horse Chesnut ( Buckeye)
    Jimson Weed
    Laurel
    Mistletoe
    Monks Hood
    Mushrooms
    Nightshades
    Poison Hemlock
    Poke weed
    Rhodedendron
    Water Hemlock
    White Snakeroot
    Wild Cheeries
    Yellow Jessamine


    woodsmith was nice enough to add the scientific names and links to my humble list .

    American Yew - Taxus canadensis
    Azalea - Rhododendron spp (spp is the abbreviation for species, there are several species with the same common name and all are poisonous), Azalea genus
    Bane berries - Actaea rubra
    Black Locust - Robinia pseudoacacia
    Canada Moonseed - Menispermum canadense
    Castor Bean - Ricinus communis
    Common Tansey - Tanacetum vulgare
    Ergot - Claviceps spp (around 50 species, C. purpurea is the most well known)
    False Hellebore - Veratrum viride
    Horse Chesnut ( Buckeye) - Aesculus spp (6 species native to North America, ranging from shrubs to tress. Aesculus glabra is the Ohio Buckeye)
    Jimson Weed - Datura stramonium
    Laurel - some species of true laurel are not poisonous, however, the common name has come to refer to any plant that has leaves similar to a bay laurel or that was used to make laurel wreaths. Mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) is native and very toxic, cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) is an imported species that is also poisonous.
    Mistletoe - again, this is a common name used for unrelated species. Phoradendron spp is the genus native to the americas.
    Monks Hood - can refer to over 250 species of flowering plants in the Aconitum genus.
    Mushrooms - Fungi contain some of the most poisonous organisms in the world, too large a group to really go into.
    Nightshades - usually used to refer to the entire Solanaceae genus, includes flowering shrubs, plants, and vines. Tomatoes and potatoes are in this genus. If it looks like a tomato plant but it's not in your garden...don't eat it.
    Poison Hemlock - Conium maculatum, many other names
    Poke weed - Phytolacca americana, parts of the plant are highly toxic
    Rhodedendron - Rhododendron, genus of over 1000 species, many of which contain toxic compounds. Azaleas are related to this genus.
    Water Hemlock - Cicuta spp, small genus of 4 toxic species
    White Snakeroot - Ageratina altissima
    Wild Cherries - Prunus avium (all parts except ripe fruit slightly toxic)
    Yellow Jessamine - Gelsemium sempervirens[/
    Last edited by riverjoe; 03-28-2013 at 10:27 PM.


  2. #2
    birdman6660 birdman6660's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NORTHERN ONTARIO CANADA
    Posts
    216

    Default

    Hmmmm wonder how many of those I have up my way ....I'm gonna have to look up pictures for most of those plants .. i have heard of some but not ever seen most of 'em !
    THE PROSPECTOR ! !

  3. #3
    Senior Member Dennis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    N.W. Arkansas
    Posts
    143

    Default

    Thanks I'm going to check my area too.
    All through history it has been proven that the right to keep and bear arms is ultimately the only thing that keeps us free

  4. #4
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    31º4.3'N, 84º52.7'W
    Posts
    3,969
    Blog Entries
    7

    Default

    It might be worth mentioning that a few of those are toxic to honey bees as well.
    Parts of those plants might be edible, and is why a person must undertake years of diligent study. For some the entire plant is edible in one stage of growth, and is completely deadly in others.
    I encourage you to memorize the plants and their parts. Nice post!

  5. #5
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    58,597

    Default

    As well as those that won't necessarily kill you but can pose problems/illness. Common Pokeweed (Phytolacca decandra) comes to mind.
    Tracks Across the High Plains...Death on the Bombay Line...A Touch of Death and Mayhem...All On Amazon Books.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Nprthern Indiana
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Petersons does not get into the poisonous funghi in depth . Its not really fair to the funghi hunters but that's a whole nother bushel of corn . Id like to list the deadly funghi also but so far havn't found them in a, easy to copy, list like this .

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by riverjoe View Post
    Petersons does not get into the poisonous funghi in depth . Its not really fair to the funghi hunters but that's a whole nother bushel of corn . Id like to list the deadly funghi also but so far havn't found them in a, easy to copy, list like this .
    True. I find it interesting that they just lump "mushrooms" in with poisonous plants when technically they aren't "plants." Each species is as distinct as any plant is. It is good to know the poisonous things out there, and the edibles. YCC is right on in that you should memorize and really "know" as many plants and mushrooms as possible for both their uses and dangers. Some people want to know the poisonous ones just so they can avoid them, but really you should avoid ANY plant or mushroom you can't 100% identify. Take the time to really become familiar with all the plants and fungus in your area, don't eat anything you aren't 110% sure about it's identity, what parts are edible, and how to process them properly, and you can be 110% safe. It really is a lot of fun......if you follow the rules.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Nprthern Indiana
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Agreed . Just knowing the deadly ones is not enough . Im sure some not on this list are ready to jump on and I wouldn't want to be confirmed fatality number 25 . Some like the Hemlocks are good to know because of the other members of the Carrot family which resemble it and the added caution necessary . Same with the Nightshade family .
    Same as edible plants not processed correctly . I remember reading about Jack in the Pulpit being edible so I popped one im my mouth . About the same sensation as taking a drink of Drano .

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    378

    Default

    Lol! Haven't tried the drano, but I have tried the JITP. Accidentally while digging trout Lilly bulbs. Tasted like wasps.... like a whole hive...... in my mouth....

  10. #10

    Default

    Where'd you copy the list from?

    As an aside, the honey made by bees taking nectar from Rhodies and Azaleas is also somewhat toxic. Has to be a heavy concentration of the plants around. Like near a nursery.
    If we are to have another contest in…our national existence I predict that the dividing line will not be Mason and Dixon's, but between patriotism & intelligence on the one side, and superstition, ambition & ignorance on the other…
    ~ President Ulysses S. Grant

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Nprthern Indiana
    Posts
    32

    Default

    " Edible Wild Plants " by Peterson . This book although not so easy to ID plants from the drawings is very comprehensive . It's a good little book to take to the field , find a plant and then research it more from other referances or the internet .
    woodsmith was nice enough to type the scientific names for me so Im going to try and copy those .......here .

    American Yew - Taxus canadensis
    Azalea - Rhododendron spp (spp is the abbreviation for species, there are several species with the same common name and all are poisonous), Azalea genus
    Bane berries - Actaea rubra
    Black Locust - Robinia pseudoacacia
    Canada Moonseed - Menispermum canadense
    Castor Bean - Ricinus communis
    Common Tansey - Tanacetum vulgare
    Ergot - Claviceps spp (around 50 species, C. purpurea is the most well known)
    False Hellebore - Veratrum viride
    Horse Chesnut ( Buckeye) - Aesculus spp (6 species native to North America, ranging from shrubs to tress. Aesculus glabra is the Ohio Buckeye)
    Jimson Weed - Datura stramonium
    Laurel - some species of true laurel are not poisonous, however, the common name has come to refer to any plant that has leaves similar to a bay laurel or that was used to make laurel wreaths. Mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) is native and very toxic, cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) is an imported species that is also poisonous.
    Mistletoe - again, this is a common name used for unrelated species. Phoradendron spp is the genus native to the americas.
    Monks Hood - can refer to over 250 species of flowering plants in the Aconitum genus.
    Mushrooms - Fungi contain some of the most poisonous organisms in the world, too large a group to really go into.
    Nightshades - usually used to refer to the entire Solanaceae genus, includes flowering shrubs, plants, and vines. Tomatoes and potatoes are in this genus. If it looks like a tomato plant but it's not in your garden...don't eat it.
    Poison Hemlock - Conium maculatum, many other names
    Poke weed - Phytolacca americana, parts of the plant are highly toxic
    Rhodedendron - Rhododendron, genus of over 1000 species, many of which contain toxic compounds. Azaleas are related to this genus.
    Water Hemlock - Cicuta spp, small genus of 4 toxic species
    White Snakeroot - Ageratina altissima
    Wild Cherries - Prunus avium (all parts except ripe fruit slightly toxic)
    Yellow Jessamine - Gelsemium sempervirens[/QUOTE]
    Last edited by riverjoe; 03-28-2013 at 09:59 AM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member WolfVanZandt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    1,670

    Default

    What? No Oleander?
    True enough, my final home is still out there, but this is most certainly my home range and I love it. I love every rock I fall off and tree I trip over. Even when I am close to dying from exhaustion, a beautiful sunset doesn't lose it's power to refresh and inspire me and that, in itself, is enough to save me sometimes.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Nprthern Indiana
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Yeah .... I wondered about that too . There is a movie starring Owen Wilson ( I think thats his name ) who systematically poisons people using Oleander . I guess you have to knowingly concentrate it . Check this quote .


    However, despite the common "poisonous" designation of this plant, very few toxic events in humans have been reported. According to the Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) in 2002 there were 847 human exposures to oleander reported to poison centers in the United States.[12] Despite this exposure level, from 1985 through 2005, only three deaths were reported. One cited death was apparently due to the ingestion of oleander leaves by a diabetic man.[13] His blood indicated a total blood concentration of cardiac glycosides of approximately 20 μg/L which is well above the reported fatal level. Another study reported on the death of a woman who self-administered "an undefined oleander extract" both orally and rectally and her oleandrin tissue levels were 10 to 39 μg/g which were in the high range of reported levels at autopsy.[14] And, finally, one study reported the death of a woman who ingested oleander 'tea'.[15] Few other details were provided.

  14. #14
    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    7,724

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by riverjoe View Post
    Agreed . Just knowing the deadly ones is not enough . Im sure some not on this list are ready to jump on and I wouldn't want to be confirmed fatality number 25 . Some like the Hemlocks are good to know because of the other members of the Carrot family which resemble it and the added caution necessary . Same with the Nightshade family .
    Same as edible plants not processed correctly . I remember reading about Jack in the Pulpit being edible so I popped one im my mouth . About the same sensation as taking a drink of Drano .
    Jack in the pulpit can be used only after it has been dried for a very,very long time,Indians used it in different stages,for different reasons,including it's poisous stages.Not one will be using without much much more study.
    Soular powered by the son.

    Nell, MLT (ASCP)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •