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Thread: Spider bites

  1. #41
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by welderguy View Post
    I remember that, and I remember seeing the pictures that were posted about them too.
    Here ya go....


    http://www.burkemuseum.org/spidermyt...elspider2.html
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  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    LOL yep !!
    I Wonder Who was the first person to look at a cow and say, "I think I'll squeeze these dangly things here, and drink what ever comes out?"

  3. #43
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    Would that be the infamous African barking spiders you speak of?

    They are known to inhabit the trees around the perimeter of a camp fire, waiting for the unsuspecting after supper that included beans, chili w/beans or potato salad w/eggs.....and beer.

    Can be very dangerous......
    I think he was referring to the space alien barking spiders that originated from Uranus.
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  4. #44
    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    Just to think all this time I thought Hunter and Rick was stepping on ducks and frogs. Now I find out it's just mere barking spiders.

  5. #45

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    I heard Barking spiders inhabit the same areas as Drop bears down this way?

    You guys are very lucky only having the Black Widow. The last course we were on out bush, I had a male funnel web spider stop about 30cm from my foot late at night.(I 'd taken my boots of and was bare foot). Lucky I spotted him. The bastards are everywhere up and down the East Coast. AND we have tree funnel webs too!
    Last edited by Rick; 05-04-2015 at 08:58 AM. Reason: Restored Post

  6. #46

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    additional info for visitors to Aus.



    Hexathelidae: Dangerous Australian funnel spiders
    Hexathelid spiders live in Australia, and their funnel webs are really burrows lined with silk. These spiders have a dangerous bite. Two well-known species of Hexathelidae are the Sydney funnel spider and the northern tree funnel spider. Both are often included on lists of the most deadly spiders in the world, according to the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO).

    “This group contains some spiders of medical significance in their native Australia,” Bills said.While most species are not dangerous to humans, the Sydney funnel spider and the tree-dwelling venomous biters have garnered deadly reputations.

    Appearance

    According to the World Heritage Encyclopedia, these funnel spiders are medium-sized, getting up to about 1 to 2 inches (2.54 to 5 centimeters), and are typically black or brown. Bills noted that they are mygalomorphs, which means they have “distinct fangs and ... long spinnerets.” They are distinguished by their shiny carapace (hard covering over the front of the body), which is lightly haired. Males are smaller than females.

    Behavior

    According to Bills, these spiders typically live in burrows. These mostly nocturnal spiders can be found at any time of the year. They prefer humid climates, as they are susceptible to drying out, according to the Australian Museum.

    During the summer, males leave their burrows and go wandering for females. The two spiders spar until the female accepts the male. To mate, they rear up on their hind legs and press their bodies together, according to the Australian Museum. They also assume this rearing position when threatened.

    According to the Queensland Museum, the female spider lays her eggs in her burrow. Once they hatch, the young spiders stay in the burrow until they are big enough to leave. Males only live for a few months after mating, but females can live for several years (some reports say up to 20).

    Burrowers

    Australian funnel spiders pick moist and sheltered places to build their burrows, like under rocks or logs or in shrubbery. According to the Museum Victoria, the entrance to the burrow is surrounded by irregular strands of silk, which act as trip wires, alerting the spider hiding in the burrow that prey is present. The spider then goes out and attacks.

    These spiders usually eat insects or small vertebrates like lizards or frogs.

    Tree dwellers

    While most funnel spiders live on the ground, a few species on the eastern coast of Australia live in wet forest trees. They typically live in rotting holes in the bark and build silk trip wires outside the holes to alert themselves to prey, according to the Australian Museum. The inside of their holes may be lined with silk, and bits of bark are used to disguise the entrance. Their dwellings have been found as much as 30 meters off the ground.

    Dangerous species

    According to the Australian Museum, bites from all species of Australian funnel-web spiders are considered potentially dangerous, but the two most notorious are the Sydney funnel-web spider and the northern tree-dwelling funnel spider.

    The black or brown Sydney funnel-web spider’s habitat correlates closely with the greater Sydney area. Male Sydney funnel-webs are exclusively responsible for human deaths from this spider's bite. Their venom is five times as toxic as the female’s because it contains a special chemical called Robustoxin. Females lack this chemical, explains the Australian Museum. Furthermore, males wander, searching for mates and running a higher risk of encountering humans, while females stay in their burrows.

    The northern tree-dwelling funnel spider is also highly dangerous but much more rarely encountered because it lives in a remote mountain area.

    Antivenom was discovered in the 1980s, and no one has died of bites from either species since.

    Dipluridae: Funnel-web tarantulas
    Spiders in the Dipluridae family are commonly known as funnel-web tarantulas. “This family belongs to the group of mygalomorphs, a spider group with distinct fangs and they have long spinnerets,” Bills said.

    Most of these spiders live in the tropics of Central and South America, but they are found worldwide, including Australia, Africa and Central Asia.

    Appearance

    These spiders are medium to small-size, according to the World Heritage Encyclopedia. Some are as small as 3 mm, while others grow to about 15 mm (about half an inch).

    Behavior

    Their funnel webs are rather messy and are composed of flattened, often branching tunnels they can use for retreating when danger approaches. Some species prefer to hide their webs under rocks, while others live exclusively under mats of moss, rotting logs and other organic debris, according to the EOL.

  7. #47

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    Almost all spider bite deaths are the very young, sick and infirm. We run into the webs of seriously large spiders all the time.

    I think the most serious problem with spiders is arachnophobia. My brother Gary had a bad case. He had every type of snake and an Asian Water Monitor that was large enough that he gave it its own room in his house. But, even the most harmless of spiders or bugs set him to screaming like a little girl. LOL

    Then he bought a chunk of land up in north Florida. He was walking back to his truck with a couple of friends after it became too dark to hunt. He noticed all of these reflections and asked what all of them were. There were thousands of little eyes shining back at him everywhere. "Those are spiders", he was told.

    Sometimes the only way to manage your fears is to face them and he had no way to get out of that field except to walk through those spiders. Knowing that it would be impossible to do so without getting several spiders on you in the process. He now has a respect for them. Just not the fear he once had.

  8. #48
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    We have more than just Black Widows for poisonous spiders. https://sites.google.com/site/venomo...nomous-spiders

    And by the way.....we have barking spiders here.....at least that's what my wife calls them.
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  9. #49

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    http://www.livescience.com/37974-he-...der-bites.html

    http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=97804

    http://www.burkemuseum.org/spidermyt...la.html#deadly

    A doctor treating an wound and saying it could have been a brown recluse is not a professional diagnosis.

    For instance a statement like this, ""He was working in an old house tearing out the existing walls and ceilings and replacing them. Brown recluse spiders like to live in those old houses," he said.
    Nelson said Reese was never tested to determine what type of spider bit him, but medical records show there were definite complications from a spider bite wound on his neck."

    This is typical of a doctor saying it probably is a recluse bite when it is more likely a staph infection.


    http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/02/28/florida-man-dies-from-spider-bite/


    My daughter just called me and sent a text to me last Monday because she thought my grand-daughter had been bitten by a spider.

    Guests can not see images in the messages. Please register in the forum.

    She was checking the mail and there was a wasp nest on the mail box with wasps. But, it took me calling her and telling her it was probably a wasp for her to add that information. But, her fears went to the "deadly spider" before the obvious wasp.

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