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Thread: Bedroll Feasibility

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I think Hunter pointed out above that wool is heavy. Wet wool is VERY heavy and will make you sweat if you are forced to wear it very long. Not good in cool to cold environs. Walking with wet wool is a lot of work. That's the reason lighter clothing was developed.
    I would think that wet wool that makes you sweat would be no different than wet wool? The problem with sweating in cold weather is that the sweat could ice up.How is sweat worse than water?


  2. #22
    Senior Member GreatUsername's Avatar
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    I suppose he means that it will make you sweat from the exertion, and once you remove the outer (now heavy) layers of wool, the sweat will chill you rapidly. Personally, I don't see the issue, but I understand the logic. I generally just don't take off my wool unless it is very wet and needs to be dry, and then I have a fire going.
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  3. #23
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    You need a lot of water intake in cold weather and walking with heavy clothing that makes you sweat means you need more water intake. Wet cold is wet cold whether it's wet by water or wet by sweat but dehydration by hypothermia has to be a lousy way to go.

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  4. #24
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    Great discussion. Ever since KYrat posted about his Florida trip, and all the others, plus Hunter and his posts, I have been thinking about reenactment clothing. My church likes to do reenactments of crossing the plains in the mid 1800's. One thing I was wondering about was Hemp clothing. Any experience with Hemp?
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  5. #25
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Hemp, tends to be itchy...but then a real mountain man wouldn't care....LOL.
    Actually some of the commercial made cloth or even purchased olden style clothes are pretty nice.

    I'm looking into a hunting smock for another jump back in time to the 1856-60's....so I will let you know.
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  6. #26
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    Hemp, tends to be itchy...but then a real mountain man wouldn't care....LOL.
    Actually some of the commercial made cloth or even purchased olden style clothes are pretty nice.

    I'm looking into a hunting smock for another jump back in time to the 1856-60's....so I will let you know.
    Do you mean 1756-1760 Hunter?

    And are you wanting the SMOCK or the fringed hunting shirt?

    Here in Long-hunter country we have a three step system;

    Wagoneers smock, which is a pull-over knee length design

    Split front smock, which is the wagoneers smock split open down the front and worn like a coat. Over lapped in front and worn with a sash as a belt.

    Fringed hunting shirt, which is the traditional "rifleman's frock" seen everywhere.

    The wagoneers smock and split front smock are good to 1756-60 but the fringed rifel frock did not come around until just before the rev war.

    I use a wagoneers smock with fringe on the shoulders and seams but without the cape of the rifle frock since the cape irritates me to death flopping around when trying to to any work or demos. That and I sometimes do historic sites that go back to 1670+- and the smock is a timeless piece of gear.

    Hemp would be a good fabric for any of them and time appropriate. Many different grades of hemp fabric were used back then, from rough to very fine. It was easier to deal with than cotton before the cotton gin was developed and used for many things that we have substituted cotton for.

    Up in your neck of the woods you can go way back in the time frame. The French were in there pretty early and the HBC was right on their tail, espically after the F&I war.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 02-20-2013 at 04:00 PM.
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  7. #27
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Yeah I meant 1756-60's....not sure, been looking for something to wear to be correct with the French fusil......but just started getting my reading in......

    http://www.trackofthewolf.com/List/Item.aspx/306/1
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  8. #28
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    No real rules apply to that decision Hunter. Again, there are a lot of self appointed "experts" that try to warp history to meet their need.

    We had French traders and hunters mixed in with the longhunters drifting over the mountains from NC and VA down in TN and here in KY all along the Ohio River. Several of the English/Scott/German longhunters in TN had French hunting partners and they drifted in and out of the KY forts constantly. Nashville's origional name was French Lick and it was not changed until 1780. KY was French long before it was English. Wisconson was the same!

    The guns and gear were often mixed and matched so do what you feel comfortable with.

    I remember reading in one of Hansons' books where they excivated a lot of English guns using imported french flints and some were double patched where the natives were buying smaller bore precast balls bought from the French in their English guns. What it ment was that some goods were being bought from English traders and some from French sources. They were not tied to one source or style. They would trade with HBC today and jump in their canoe and head for a French fort tomorrow.

    Also means that an English hunter in a French town would buy a shirt made by some Indian girl from French fabric if he needed one. Same for a French hunter at Ft Boonesboro. I doubt he would stop wearing the shirt when he went home. The wagoneers smock was a universal garmet, worn all over Europe to protect the clothing. (Sort of like modern day "coveralls".) I have seen the same garmet in English, French, Italian and German paintings.

    The form of the work smock remained unchanged from the middle ages right to the 20th century. It was worn lose or belted and made from whatever fabric was chep, sturdy and available.

    Check this link and scroll down to the illistration between page 56-57. It's purebred French and has your work smock shown.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=1C5...rovers&f=false

    Parts of this link are missing but the one selling rabbits and the very last one are excellent.

    http://www.larsdatter.com/18c/smocks.html


    http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.co...len-frock.html
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 02-20-2013 at 05:54 PM.
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  9. #29
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Half the fun is the research.....so I am just plugging along....
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  10. #30
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Yea, I get carried away when I find a folio of old paintings of rural scenes with the common people and their clothes included.

    Research is one place where I am glad I have access to the internet. University to University trade of information was one of the origional reasons for internet development, not tweets and Facebook.

    Check out that last link above. That Woodsrunner's Diary is a blogspot with serious documentation. Proper grammer and punctuation also. It reads like real English!
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 02-20-2013 at 06:01 PM.
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  11. #31
    Not a Mod finallyME's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post

    Check out that last link above. That Woodsrunner's Diary is a blogspot with serious documentation. Proper grammer and punctuation also. It reads like real English!
    Here is his youtube channel. He really must be an expert then. I have been subscribed to his channel for a while. Didn't know he had a blog as well.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/historicaltrekking
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  12. #32
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Thanks will check it out........
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  13. #33
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    An Australian longhunter,

    Who woulda' thought?
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  14. #34
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    Regarding wool and staying warm when it's wet, according to an article I read on Andrew Skurka's blog that seemed to make sense, the advantage of wool over synthetics as a base layer is that the moisture tends to move into the fiber, thus, away from the skin so you don't get that clammy feel you get with cotton or even hydrophobic fabrics like polyester. Polyester fiber is 100% hydrophobic. While moisture can move between the fibers and this is where moisture 'hangs out' in the fabric when you're really sweating, this keeps the moisture close to your skin. Wool fibers on the other hand pull that moisture to the core of the fiber and while moisture can also 'hang out' outside the fibers, by its very nature, it wicks into the fiber.

    The relevance is lower in this thread when it comes to staying warm and dry with a wool bedroll. In all cases a wet media will absorb calories and make you colder than a dry media. The advantages of synthetic loft material is it has retains more dead air space because it is less prone to collapse than down. Dead air space = warmth. Pound for pound, dry down is best, but synthetic fiber loft material is a close second and wet it beats down hands down. Dry wool is warm, but it's also heavy. Wet wool is not warm, but probably provides more dead air space than a soggy down sleeping bag.
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  15. #35
    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
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    I have never been into reinactments except for wearing my indian loin cloth around the house

  16. #36
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    An Australian longhunter,

    Who woulda' thought?
    Kinda make you wonder if they are modeled after the Australian or American frontiers....
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  17. #37
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    Kinda make you wonder if they are modeled after the Australian or American frontiers....
    Australian frontier is pretty cool in its own right. Much like America post War of 1812 without the fur trade with wambats and 'roos replacing the deer and buffalo.

    I hear the Germans do some Colonial American/longhunter stuff too. Makes sense due to a bunch of the settlers comming out of Germany.

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  18. #38
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Kinda make ya wonder what they are doing with allllllll that forest land in Siberia......always kinda looked like the Ponderosa to me....
    Mountain man with Nagant.......
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