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Thread: Canning at 15 PSI

  1. #1

    Default Canning at 15 PSI

    Most pressure canning stuff I've seen has recipes or guides for 10 psi, with adjustments for altitude. But, at sea level, if you can at 15 psi you can achieve higher temperatures, and so shorter processing times. My canner can go up to 15 psi, but I can't find any good information on recipes or a conversion formula for canning. It can be significant, I found one reference mentioning botulism in something might need 40 minutes at 10 psi, but just 3 minutes at 15 psi. I also saw a mention that at higher psi is how you could theoretically do pureed pumpkin like a commercial canner.

    So, does anyone have a good source on pressure canning at 15 psi at sea level?


  2. #2
    Senior Member Winnie's Avatar
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    I'm afraid I stick to the USDA rules rigidly. I would rather use a tried and tested method recognised by a reputable body than possibly poison myself or even worse, someone else. I really don't think it's worth the risk.
    I would imagine that after canning cubed Pumpkin(which you can safely do by the way), it would be easy enough to whizz it up into a puree in a blender after the fact, rather than before.
    Recession; A period when you go without something your Grandparents never heard of.

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    I'd have to agree with Winnie on this one. Higher temperatures doesn't necessarily correspond to faster thermal penetration to kill any harmful bacteria within the food being canned. My understanding is that both the elapsed time and the sustained temperature are critical in achieving safe results.

  4. #4

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    Sure, but there are time tables for 15 psi, and they must exist somewhere. I did read from the USDA that you can do nonacidic foods using the boiling water method, but the safe processing times are like 12 hours. So sea level = 12 hours, 10 psi = 40 minutes, 15 psi = ??? The scientist in me wants to know.

    As for my squash, I like roasting it, to develop more flavor, and that makes it soft and mushy and so I couldn't do the cube canning bit.

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    Senior Member BornthatWay's Avatar
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    If you live in the county youmight check with the home extension agent. They are usually with the agriculture dept for your county.

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    According to the University of Minnesota Extension canning at 10 psi at lower altitudes is recommended because:

    "Note: Individuals using a weighted-gauge canner at altitudes less than 1000 feet may use 10 PSI instead of 15 PSI for the canner pressure. This will improve nutrient and quality retention."

    I don't think that it can't be done, it is just simply recommended that it not be done because of the quality of the end product. I thin it is sorta akin to simmering your stew verses boiling the snot out of it. One is gonna be better, but in the end, they both got cooked.

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    Oh, incidentally, I heard on the news as I was walking through the living room that one of the universities apart of the extension cooperative concerning canning and such produced botulism in a high acid food from a water bath environment. Anyone else hear about that or was I dreaming?

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydentor View Post
    Oh, incidentally, I heard on the news as I was walking through the living room that one of the universities apart of the extension cooperative concerning canning and such produced botulism in a high acid food from a water bath environment. Anyone else hear about that or was I dreaming?
    I've heard that, and trying to verify the source and context. What little I have so far is pointing towards the government trying to extend it's influence into the canning world.
    http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/P...ds/default.htm
    http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/FSMA/ucm257980.htm

    The operative words are high acid. What I am hearing is a ban in the making for home canned food based on it's type at co-ops, farmers markets, etc.

    If it's canned properly, it's no problem. You can have a botulism problem by taking shortcuts. Unfortunately, the government is attempting to stick it's nose in that tent because of the few people out there who don't take proper care during canning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cwi555 View Post
    I've heard that, and trying to verify the source and context. What little I have so far is pointing towards the government trying to extend it's influence into the canning world.
    I've been eating home canned food since I was a born and have been canning since I could see over the kitchen counter and have never ever had a problem with the methods I was taught. But then again, those methods include being able to eat off the floor and birth a baby on the counter with a chance of contamination at almost nil. But that is just how I was taught.

    I've been scowering the internet news to find some article or something that would lead back to what I heard in passing but I can find nothing. I think that is the more distressing part. I kinda heard it but now I can't find it which makes me wonder what news on it I'm going to wake up to tomorrow.

    Sorry to hijack your thread, Chris!

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