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Thread: Suburban Mushroom hunt today

  1. #1
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    Default Suburban Mushroom hunt today

    Coprinus comatus:

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    Pleurotus ostreatus and P. ostreatus with Clitocybe nuda:

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    Agaricus xanthodermus:

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    Pholiotina filaris (a very toxic mushroom which has caused deaths):

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    Presumed Heboloma sp. Unsure:

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    Stropharia or leratiomyces sp:

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    Lepiotiod, unknown (froma distance, I'd hoped this was a Macrolepiota, but no dice):

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    Amanita sp, similar to A. ocreata (a very toxic species which has caused many deaths)

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    Psathyrella sp, probably P. gracilis:

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    No real idea off the bat, observed in neighbor's lawn:

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    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
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  2. #2
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    The edibles cleaned and cut up:

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    The oysters are now spread out to dry partially out so they will keep longer in he refrigerator.

    The shaggies are fried up, and I'm feeling like some wild mushroom pizza:

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    The base trimmings and the little bit of bark that came loose with the oysters will be used to start a culture, and grown on logs of compressed sawdust in the yard, if they take. A previous year's try failed after the culture established because I forgot to water it for an entire summer (silly me).
    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
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  3. #3
    Senior Member RandyRhoads's Avatar
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    Outstanding... Multiple edible species in one trip. Did you make it to the MSSF Myco meet in Berkley last weekend?

  4. #4
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    No

    The lady and I are planning a couple days up the coast for camping and foraying though.
    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
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    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    I wish A. xanthodermus and A. californicus weren't nearly the only Agaricus species fruiting around here this time of year. It's so much of a tease to see them fruiting everywere and no A. arvensis or A. campestris around.
    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
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  6. #6
    One step at a time intothenew's Avatar
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    Impressive, thanks for posting.
    "They call us civilized because we are easy to sneak up on."- Lone Waite

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    Senior Member payne's Avatar
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    Nice find on the Amanita.

    The last one could be Psilocybe Cyanescens, but it doesn't look chesnut-color enough. It seems a bit campanulate too.

  8. #8
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    No, it couldn't.
    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
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  9. #9
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    I do have plenty of pictures of P. cyanescens I've found, but all from the bay area. They have to my knowledge only been found in the central valley a couple of times, with the similar species currently being called Psilocybe cyanofriscosa nom. prov. having been found a couple of times as well, in Sacramento, Stockton, Merced and in the case of the cyanescens once in Modesto. It's pretty rare, but it's bound to happen from time to time, due to the nature of their spread with nursery plants and woodchips, the former of which get shipped all around the world and the later of which are shipped all across the state. This is likely how P. cyanescens was brought to Seattle and San Francisco from Europe decades ago, and the cyanofriscosa from wherever it was they came from about 10 years ago.

    Here are some such photos.
    Last edited by canid; 12-06-2012 at 08:46 AM.
    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    To see more of my bladesmithing, visit CanidArmory or check us out on Facebook.

  10. #10
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    Randy: you know there's a mushroom fair coming up in Nevada City the 8th and 9th? I will probably be camping and hunting mushrooms up the coast then, but it sounds like a nice one.
    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    To see more of my bladesmithing, visit CanidArmory or check us out on Facebook.

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    Senior Member payne's Avatar
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    Those are beauties. Didn't know P. Cyanescens could grow in grass.

    How do you identify it properly when the cap is not expanded and wavy? I would have passed by most of the mushrooms pictures in your album. :/
    I'd classify them either as Psilocybe baeocystis or possibly Panaeolina foenisecii.

    You seem to have quite a large knowledge of mushrooms. I guess I should share some pictures with you, as well as ask for help in identifying a certain mushroom patch.


    Here is the fruit of a single day of mushroom picking around Qualicum Beach (on Vancouver Island):

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    First picture: Coral mushrooms on the left, Chanterelles on the right.
    Second picture: 3 cauliflower mushrooms, a bunch of chanterelles, some coral mushrooms, and angel wings on the bottom right.
    We found some Jelly mushrooms as well, but didn't collect them. A few False Chanterelles, and some Jack'O'Lanterns too.

    Here are the mushrooms that I have been puzzling with:

    I believe they are Psilocybe Stuntzii ("Blue Ringers"), but could never really confirm.
    Habitat:
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    Gills, stem, veil:
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    Cap, stem, veil:
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    In the drying process, they did become green-blueish. However, the tint went away when they were completely dried. Definitely hygrophanous.

    Location: Nanaino, Vancouver Island. Found it on some cut grass patch of a private company on the side of the highway. It grew mostly in groups of about 10-15. Found about 3 patches of them.

    I did not know you couldn't take a spore print once mushrooms are dried, unfortunately. However, I do know that the color on the veil is caused by the falling of spores, and not bruising. So we could possibly consider that as a spore print. Which would mean "Dark Blue". From what I remember seeing as a deposit in the coffee filter when I was drying, "greyish" could describe the spore print as well.

    This is the book I was using to determine on the field whether or not I had found P. Stuntzii:
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    Also, Birch Bolete?
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    Found a bit outside of Whitehorse, on the Yukon River.

    And about P. Cyanescens, and Psilocybes in general, I always wondered how quickly the "blueing" from bruising occurs. And does 'breaking the stem' count as a bruising, or it's too radical?

    And here are some Panaeolus Campanulatus that we've picked on Lake Laberge on our raft trip in the Yukon:
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    I ate them all, and didn't get any effect from them. I read something like at least 80 must be ingested to have effects.
    I also read, several days after ingesting them, that they in fact supposedly contain ibotenic acid, which is toxic. I personally haven't felt any side-effects.
    Last edited by payne; 12-06-2012 at 06:10 PM.

  12. #12
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by payne View Post
    Those are beauties. Didn't know P. Cyanescens could grow in grass.

    How do you identify it properly when the cap is not expanded and wavy? I would have passed by most of the mushrooms pictures in your album. :/
    I'd classify them either as Psilocybe baeocystis or possibly Panaeolina foenisecii.
    Cyans have no problem with grass but are in fact growing from woody debris in/on the soil. This is reasonably common.

    Panaeolina foenisecii is easy to separate because it really looks very little like a Psilocybe in general, It has a delicate stipe and cap which break easily and are really not rubbery in texture, whereas P. cyanescens, in common with many Psilocybe species is downright rubbery, wtih the stipe being at least somewhat cartiliginous. Psilocybes have caps which are viscid, or even lubricous when fully hydrated, especially when young. P. cyanescens, as pins have a fine white cortinate veil.

    Those pictured are very easy to separate from P. baeocystis for a handfull of reasons. Firstly, P. baeocystis is not known from San Francisco. Second, they grow into classic P. cyanescens if left undisturbed. Admittedly though, it can occasionally be difficult. I've found tiny, tall, petite cyanescens in Washington which were taken for beefy, wavy P. pelliculosa until microscopy. I've found P. azurescens in Oregon whch go undulate/wavy in he margins at maturity, and P. cyanescens in the same place with umbonate caps, see below:

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    You seem to have quite a large knowledge of mushrooms. I guess I should share some pictures with you, as well as ask for help in identifying a certain mushroom patch.


    Here is the fruit of a single day of mushroom picking around Qualicum Beach (on Vancouver Island):
    Those are beautiful. That must have been a good hunt.

    Here are the mushrooms that I have been puzzling with:

    I believe they are Psilocybe Stuntzii ("Blue Ringers"), but could never really confirm.
    Habitat:
    ...
    Gills, stem, veil:
    Guests can not see images in the messages. Please register in the forum.
    Cap, stem, veil:
    ...

    In the drying process, they did become green-blueish. However, the tint went away when they were completely dried. Definitely hygrophanous.

    Location: Nanaino, Vancouver Island. Found it on some cut grass patch of a private company on the side of the highway. It grew mostly in groups of about 10-15. Found about 3 patches of them.

    I did not know you couldn't take a spore print once mushrooms are dried, unfortunately. However, I do know that the color on the veil is caused by the falling of spores, and not bruising. So we could possibly consider that as a spore print. Which would mean "Dark Blue". From what I remember seeing as a deposit in the coffee filter when I was drying, "greyish" could describe the spore print as well.
    I would call those P. stuntzii. P. fimetaria is also a candidate. You should remember that like many of the psilocybin mushrooms, they freuqently bruise blue latently if at all. If the flesh darkens e.g. in the stipe between the point where it is half dry (and lightened from hygrophany) and when it is fully dry, light blueing may no longer be visible. I have seen this happen in P. semilanceata and P. strictipes many times, as well as many in which no blueing ever showed. It can indicate lower alkaloid levels, but ultimately it only indicates low levels of a couple of them, and not overall content of total alkaloids.

    This is the book I was using to determine on the field whether or not I had found P. Stuntzii:
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    I do not know that guide well, but if you really want to know the psilocybin containing mushrooms well, I suggest you try to find Guzman's writings. Particuarly with Psilocybe, as he wrote the monograph, and it is his work and his word which defines the species in the first place. It's hard to get more accurate that that

    Also, Birch Bolete?
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    Found a bit outside of Whitehorse, on the Yukon River.
    From the highly contrasted scabers on the stipe and the pore surface with it's aparent brown bruising, Leccinum certainly sounds reasonable. I'm not terribly good with these, but North american species are almost never easy to narrow [correctly] to species anyway. To start with, almost all the accepted species are Old world taxa which most likely do not even occur in North America. The problem has been that biologists over the last couple centuries have merely found species here which are very similar to the established taxa and just started calling them that, even were the fit is not particularly reflective of actual phylogeny. This is seen in many genera, with Amanita being a great example. The last decade of molecular analysis has done much to help, but it'll probably be another decade still until a useful body of work has been completed, and longer still before this data is accepted and adopted by the community at large. Nearly every field guide to mushrooms in print needs to be revised by this point, and the older ones no longer in print are often so far behind that I would not recommend using them at all, except to generally determine what is safe or not.

    And about P. Cyanescens, and Psilocybes in general, I always wondered how quickly the "blueing" from bruising occurs. And does 'breaking the stem' count as a bruising, or it's too radical?
    or Psilocybe cyanescens, the blueing reaction can happen anywhere from right before your eyes, to slowly, or not until they begin to dry. Almost as often as not, there is already blueing present when you encounter them, as in the gills or cap margins where they grow in clusters and the caps have been pressed up against one another. I have found that with them, as with many other species, it is easier to observe in the gills [when immature], in the very margins of the cap, where the flesh is very thin, and in the base of the stipe, though it can bruise visibly anywhere.

    And here are some Panaeolus Campanulatus that we've picked on Lake Laberge on our raft trip in the Yukon:
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    I ate them all, and didn't get any effect from them. I read something like at least 80 must be ingested to have effects.
    I also read, several days after ingesting them, that they in fact supposedly contain ibotenic acid, which is toxic. I personally haven't felt any side-effects.
    Contrary to what you will find in many guides, Panaeolus campantulats is not psychoactive. There are many species in Panaeolus and Psilocybe [Most of these later now belong to the genus Deconica] which have been repeatedly published as containing psilocybin alkaloids but which do not. Mostly this is attributable to misidentifications, and likely cross contamination/accidental switches of sample material.

    Incidentally; the name Panaeolus campantulatus is deprecated, as is Panaeolus sphinctrinus. It have been shown to be the same species as Panaeolus papilionacaeus. Since that later is the older name, it was precedent.

    I don't know of them containing ibotenic acid at all. Ibotenic acid is certainly found in several species of Amanita in the muscaria group, but it is not a particularly dangerous toxin. Enough of it could certainly kill you, but small amounts it is relatively harmless, and is readily converted into muscimol. It is also unstable, and will degrade into muscimol under heat and probably UV exposure. relatively Little research has been done on the compound formally, but Remember that it has a history of human exposure extending many thousands of years.

    Remember that the primary metabolic product of Ethanol is acetaldehyde, which is similarly toxic, and is also a presumed human carcinogen, but is itself fairly rapidly metabolized by most people into acetic acid before it does very much harm, unless excessive amounts of ethanol are consumed.

    This is probably the most treatment of the psilocybin mushrooms I would like to do here at WSF though, as this isn't really the place for that. You can always find me at the Shroomery Forums for that.
    Last edited by canid; 12-06-2012 at 10:37 PM.
    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
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  13. #13
    Senior Member payne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canid View Post
    Those are beautiful. That must have been a good hunt.
    It was indeed.

    Thank you very much for your answer, kind sir.

  14. #14
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    And you for sharing.
    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
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    Senior Member RandyRhoads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canid View Post
    Randy: you know there's a mushroom fair coming up in Nevada City the 8th and 9th? I will probably be camping and hunting mushrooms up the coast then, but it sounds like a nice one.
    Aww man, i'm in Hawaii or i'd be there in a heartbeat.

    "No it couldn't" ahahaha.....And don't you mean Psilocybe alleni? Lol

    I have found P. cyanofriscosa/alleni right off 80 in Sac at Ikea.

  16. #16
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandyRhoads View Post
    And don't you mean Psilocybe alleni? Lol
    Yeah; I just read the Borovička, Rockefeller and Werner paper this evening. This name is going to take some work for me to get into my head. I know the provisional name was improper, but there are many standing taxa with such flaws, and 'cyanofriscoensis' or 'friscoensis' would have suffices. It could have been named for it's halotype's origin of Seattle as well. I love John dearly, but that man does not need his head swelled any further, honestly.
    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
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  17. #17
    Senior Member RandyRhoads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canid View Post
    I love John dearly, but that man does not need his head swelled any further, honestly.
    So i've heard, is it really that bad?

  18. #18
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    It can be. Don't get me wrong, I don't mean to slight the man, and I deeply respect his decades of dedication.
    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
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  19. #19
    Senior Member RandyRhoads's Avatar
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    Where do you guys pick up on his enflamed ego?

  20. #20
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    It's a long history of sad and mostly uninteresting stories.
    For a given claim: When the kernel of truth within is disconcerting enough, do you really think rolling it all up in a particularly thick veneer of steamy BS is going to help your case?
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