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Thread: A tale of caution

  1. #1
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    Default A tale of caution

    I don't remember seeing this posted here, but this forum is a good place for it.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/1...n_2201145.html
    Any sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice - Grey's Law.
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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Always a good thing to remind everyone that eats what they pick........If you don't know FOR SURE what it is don't eat it.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
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    Senior Member GreatUsername's Avatar
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    And even if you know for sure, if it has a deadly lookalike... it may not be worth the risk, no matter HOW sure you are.

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    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    Sure, if you're confused about what sure means.

    Mushroom hunting is not particularly dangerous if you simply learn what you are doing, and as in all things, learn to know what you don't know. We don't seem to have this phobic cultural aversion to driving, or keeping dogs, despite the fact that these things are both substantially more dangerous.
    Any sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice - Grey's Law.
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    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    here we go again
    this use to amuze me now it getting on my nerves, being cautioned about something by someone who does not understand even the basics of shrooming. As i get older i hev learned some great arguments to this and it goes a little like this. ahem..... tuning the guitar......
    " kind sir or ma'am thank you for your concern, but let me ask of you this simple question...... do you buy mushrooms at the grocery store?, Do you know what kind they are? How do you know they are safe? Let me educate on something here, The "button" mushrooms you buy are Agaricus bisporus. When they mature in 3 to 7 days they are called portabello mushrooms, still the same shroom, in the feild we call it a feild mushroom. Now this here mushroom in the button stage is eerily similar to the deadly amanita phillodies, and i would not pick it in the button stage, i would wait until it becomes mature for identification purposes, So, how do you know the one in ailse 5 is good? because experts have cultivated them and harvested them, you leave that to the experts so please leave this to us.
    ok rant over i will waiting until the standing ovation is over and the shouts of encore are finished to complete my thesis
    always be prepared-prepare all ways
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    Woodsman Adventure Wolf's Avatar
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    If you can't identify it, don't eat it. I can forge for mushrooms because I spent a lot of time reading and studying mushrooms, but if you don't have the knowledge, don't do it.

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    I don't have the knowledge and I would not want to risk it considering they have close to zero calories.

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    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    Wild garlic .night I suggest you learn about mushrooms and the nutrient that they do posses
    always be prepared-prepare all ways
    http://wareaglesurvival.blogspot.com

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    Thay can be a good source of micronutrients, but the calorie content is extremely low.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildgarlic View Post
    Thay can be a good source of micronutrients, but the calorie content is extremely low.
    Do you consider having a protein content comparable to beef "micronutrients?"

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    wildgarlic- You are correct in that mushrooms have a low caloric value. But colories aren't everything to the survivalist. Besides being high in protein, mushrooms are often abundant, easy to collect, and require minimal to no processing. These traits place the mushroom high on my list of wild foods. If I have the choice of digging up cattail rhizomes for hours in a swamp, and putting even more hours into the preparation of the flour, I have expended far more energy and recieve less of a return for my output than I would by gathering mushrooms. Of course a varied diet is best, but mushrooms are certainly on the list of priority wild foods for me. FWIW

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    Just looked it up. Mushrooms have about 100 calories a pound (but they are quite high in protein per calorie). A pound of mushrooms will take more than 100 caloires to gather.

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    Down south. BushCraft's Avatar
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    Mushrooms are a food of opportunity. If you do nothing but attempt to forage for mushrooms you will deplete your energy reserves quickly. However as an addition to a survivalist food supply they help maintain good nutrient and vitamin reserves. Plus as they are abundant and weigh nothing they can be dried and taken with you if you need to move as an ad hoc vitamin supplement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BushCraft View Post
    Mushrooms are a food of opportunity. If you do nothing but attempt to forage for mushrooms you will deplete your energy reserves quickly. However as an addition to a survivalist food supply they help maintain good nutrient and vitamin reserves. Plus as they are abundant and weigh nothing they can be dried and taken with you if you need to move as an ad hoc vitamin supplement.
    I am a physicians assisstant and I have seen one case of mushroom poisoning when I lived in akron. The patient lived, but it was pretty bad and she only ate 1. My mind is tainted on this issue.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildgarlic View Post
    Just looked it up. Mushrooms have about 100 calories a pound (but they are quite high in protein per calorie). A pound of mushrooms will take more than 100 caloires to gather.
    Quote Originally Posted by wildgarlic View Post
    I am a physicians assisstant and I have seen one case of mushroom poisoning when I lived in akron. The patient lived, but it was pretty bad and she only ate 1. My mind is tainted on this issue.
    We may have to agree to disagree on this one wg. Somehow I find it hard to believe that if I found twenty pounds of Chicken Mushrooms at the base of a tree it would take me 2000 calories to harvest it. As BushCraft points out they are an opportunists food. If your eyes are open you will find them frequently as you go about your daily business. Canid makes a good point earlier in the thread and it is one I have used on different occasions as well. As a PA have you also seen cases of car accidents? Have you stopped driving? Cars are much more dangerous than mushrooms. With mushrooms you only have yourself to worry about. If you poison yourself it is because you have broken the first rule of mushrooming: Never eat any mushroom (or plant for that matter) that you have not 100% identified. If there is the slightest doubt, don't eat it. I'm not saying you should go out and start mushrooming if your not comfortable with it. It's your choice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainmark View Post
    We may have to agree to disagree on this one wg. Somehow I find it hard to believe that if I found twenty pounds of Chicken Mushrooms at the base of a tree it would take me 2000 calories to harvest it. As BushCraft points out they are an opportunists food. If your eyes are open you will find them frequently as you go about your daily business. Canid makes a good point earlier in the thread and it is one I have used on different occasions as well. As a PA have you also seen cases of car accidents? Have you stopped driving? Cars are much more dangerous than mushrooms. With mushrooms you only have yourself to worry about. If you poison yourself it is because you have broken the first rule of mushrooming: Never eat any mushroom (or plant for that matter) that you have not 100% identified. If there is the slightest doubt, don't eat it. I'm not saying you should go out and start mushrooming if your not comfortable with it. It's your choice.
    I am not confortable with it and would only be comfortable with someone who knew what they were doing and having years of experience. I see car wreck patients and yesterday, we had the 2nd OD for the year (opiates, simple injection and they are fine, but I never say that. I say lets wait and see to scare the hell out of them)

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    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    This is about a pound:
    http://files.shroomery.org/files/04-...dumexposed.jpg

    it probably took fewer than 10 calories to walk over to, pick up and walk back with.

    same with this:
    http://files.shroomery.org/files/04-...barowsii01.jpg

    In addition to being a useful source of protein which you don't have to chase or lob weapons at to gather, most mushrooms have demostrated some potential for immuno-supportive properties which are likely to be of benefit during extended or remote activities, esepcially those in inclement weather.
    Any sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice - Grey's Law.
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    To see what's going on in my knife shop check out CanidArmory on Youtube or on Facebook.

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    Ooooooo..... Nice hedgehogs and boletes. I see you don't cut either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by canid View Post
    This is about a pound:
    http://files.shroomery.org/files/04-...dumexposed.jpg

    it probably took fewer than 10 calories to walk over to, pick up and walk back with.

    same with this:
    http://files.shroomery.org/files/04-...barowsii01.jpg

    In addition to being a useful source of protein which you don't have to chase or lob weapons at to gather, most mushrooms have demostrated some potential for immuno-supportive properties which are likely to be of benefit during extended or remote activities, esepcially those in inclement weather.
    Oriental mushrooms, yes, as for botton/portabella, no.

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    There are about three thousand miles between Canid and myself so not all mushrooms are the same and misidentifications are common when mushroomers travel considerable distance from their home turf. That said, The first mushrooms appear to be Hedgehog (sweet tooth) AKA dentinum repandum. The second has confused me a bit. And it may just be one of those differences in location. Definitely in the boletus family. I'm thinking porcini (boletus edulis) due to the white webbing near the cap. But porcini where i'm at has a darker more tan colored cap. So I could be wrong. Always difficult w/o a spore print and being able to turn it over in the hand

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