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Thread: What is your favorite panfish and why?

  1. #61

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    Perch,mmmmmmmmm bit of lemon pepper and salt fried up in bacon grease from breakfast on the lake......nothing tastes better!!


  2. #62
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    Default Carp for Christmas Eve, Hey Mom where's my gold fish?

    Quote Originally Posted by Davidlastink View Post
    Not exactly related, but anyone try carp/ goldfish or Koi?
    Yes, but I found out later that I didn't do it correctly. A longtime Chinese friend gave me some common carp which he was convinced were bass so I laughed a bit (I normally return these as quickly as possible, don't kill). I cleaned and cooked them, they tasted a bit muddy and had many small bones which were difficult to separate out. Even our cats would not eat them.

    I have read that various species of Asian carp have been raised in ponds for hundreds (possibly thousands) of years as food source for humans and were introduced to Europe hundreds of years ago and then North America etc. So you should Google and read up about it but evidently if you keep them in a clean water tank for a few days they purge and the flesh becomes much better, then some folks told me if you bleed them out this may help. Roast, deep fry or broil to get the bones and meat to separate better or something like that? I also read that in some parts of Germany and other places Carp was a traditional Christmas eve meal. Well in England and Ireland they force their kids to eat brussel sprouts for Christmas, in America we force our kids to eat this large, dry, bitter bird that is fun to hunt but does not taste very good and be Thankful for it one day a year.

    So when someone shows me how to properly purge, clean and prepare carp I'll give it another try. LOL

    Carp Also Known As: Karpfen, Weihnachtskarpfen
    In Germany, Carp is a tradtional meal eaten on Christmas Eve.
    http://www.germanfoodguide.com/cooki...?cooking_nr=43

    Edit history of Carp in China:
    In the 5th Century B.C. in China, Fan Li described the ponds used, the selection of fish, and the breeding season of common carp, together with its sex ratio and growth rate. By the Han Dynasty (3rd Century B.C. to 3rd Century A.D.), there were further developments in the production of common carp. In the Tan Dynasty (7th –10th Century) there was a transition period from common carp culture to the rearing of grass carp, black carp, silver carp and bighead carp. From the 10th to the 12th Century, expansion in the production of these four cyprinids was even greater, and the feeding habits and relationship between the species became better known. Subsequently, there has been great progress in pond-fish culture in China from the monoculture of common carp to the polyculture of grass carp, black carp, silver carp and bighead carp.
    http://www.fao.org/fishery/cultureds...ys_molitrix/en

    I'm fairly sure these were for food not just pets, LOL
    Last edited by TXyakr; 02-17-2015 at 06:42 PM. Reason: Chinese Carp History, FOOD not pets

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    Quote Originally Posted by TXyakr View Post
    Yes, but I found out later that I didn't do it correctly. A longtime Chinese friend gave me some common carp which he was convinced were bass so I laughed a bit (I normally return these as quickly as possible, don't kill). I cleaned and cooked them, they tasted a bit muddy and had many small bones which were difficult to separate out. Even our cats would not eat them.

    I have read that various species of Asian carp have been raised in ponds for hundreds (possibly thousands) of years as food source for humans and were introduced to Europe hundreds of years ago and then North America etc. So you should Google and read up about it but evidently if you keep them in a clean water tank for a few days they purge and the flesh becomes much better, then some folks told me if you bleed them out this may help. Roast, deep fry or broil to get the bones and meat to separate better or something like that? I also read that in some parts of Germany and other places Carp was a traditional Christmas eve meal. Well in England and Ireland they force their kids to eat brussel sprouts for Christmas, in America we force our kids to eat this large, dry, bitter bird that is fun to hunt but does not taste very good and be Thankful for it one day a year.

    So when someone shows me how to properly purge, clean and prepare carp I'll give it another try. LOL

    Carp Also Known As: Karpfen, Weihnachtskarpfen
    In Germany, Carp is a tradtional meal eaten on Christmas Eve.
    http://www.germanfoodguide.com/cooki...?cooking_nr=43

    Edit history of Carp in China:
    In the 5th Century B.C. in China, Fan Li described the ponds used, the selection of fish, and the breeding season of common carp, together with its sex ratio and growth rate. By the Han Dynasty (3rd Century B.C. to 3rd Century A.D.), there were further developments in the production of common carp. In the Tan Dynasty (7th –10th Century) there was a transition period from common carp culture to the rearing of grass carp, black carp, silver carp and bighead carp. From the 10th to the 12th Century, expansion in the production of these four cyprinids was even greater, and the feeding habits and relationship between the species became better known. Subsequently, there has been great progress in pond-fish culture in China from the monoculture of common carp to the polyculture of grass carp, black carp, silver carp and bighead carp.
    http://www.fao.org/fishery/cultureds...ys_molitrix/en

    I'm fairly sure these were for food not just pets, LOL

    Oh I know they can be eaten, but just heard they were a nasty fish. Carp are bototm feeders and eat anything, really if it fits in mouth and they can swallow they will. As for purging them I would wonder if the same method used for snails would work well. Large bucket of clean water and feed corn starch. Gold fish/ carp are really dirty so you may very well need 50 gallon tank to purge just one properly.

    Tempted to try making a salt crusted goldfish during Fair season this summer.

  4. #64
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    Don't like carp. They have their natural goodness with cleaning ponds and water sources. But in the oxbo lakes off the Mississippi River the carp are abundant and when you run your boat often they will start flying out of the water.

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    Quote Originally Posted by xjosh40x View Post
    Don't like carp. They have their natural goodness with cleaning ponds and water sources. But in the oxbo lakes off the Mississippi River the carp are abundant and when you run your boat often they will start flying out of the water.
    Yeah, they are an aggressive and invasive species, and can easily overpopulate since they eat anything from algae to bits off dead animals. When studying up on aquaculture and self contained pond/ grow beds, I saw more value in Carp than tilapia, at least up north. However federal laws seem to frown on carp here in the states. Truth be told I could very likely make a nice fish stew if nothing.

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    Default Crappie prepared well versus carp any way

    2 of probably over 100 great ways to cook crappie so they are not all mushy (i.e. don't use a Bass-O-Matic):



    pronounce it ˈkrä-pē not the other way

    some people believe the word originated from Canadian French dialectal crappé. (Crepe)

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    I have never eaten carp prepared well but crappie prepared even poorly is much better, if prepared well it is the best fresh water fish I have ever eaten.

    BTW earlier I said that I returned carp to the water and do not kill because in Texas (probably other states) it is against the law to "waste" fish even non-native "trash" fish like carp or native gar etc. Killing a fish or snake etc and throwing it back into the water or up on the shore is "wasting" wildlife this is illegal. Still a violation even if you don't understand the reasoning or purpose of this law.

    "Waste of Game

    It is an offense (Class C misdemeanor) if a person while hunting kills or wounds a game bird or game animal and intentionally or knowingly fails to make a reasonable effort to retrieve the animal or bird and include it in the person's daily or seasonal bag limit. It is an offense if a person intentionally takes or possesses a game bird, game animal, or fish and intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly, or with criminal negligence, fails to keep the edible portions of the bird, animal, or fish in an edible condition. It is a Class A misdemeanor to fail to retrieve or to keep in an edible condition a whitetail or mule deer, pronghorn antelope, or desert bighorn sheep hunted without landowner consent; from a vehicle, boat, or aircraft; on a public road; at night; or with the aid of a light."


    http://tpwd.texas.gov/regulations/ou...es-restitution
    Last edited by TXyakr; 02-23-2015 at 03:42 PM. Reason: Wasting laws

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    Default Raise health to eat fish, make it worth the trouble

    Quote Originally Posted by Davidlastink View Post
    Yeah, they are an aggressive and invasive species, and can easily overpopulate since they eat anything from algae to bits off dead animals. When studying up on aquaculture and self contained pond/ grow beds, I saw more value in Carp than tilapia, at least up north. However federal laws seem to frown on carp here in the states. Truth be told I could very likely make a nice fish stew if nothing.
    There are also some fairly strict regulations on raising Tilapia in a pond or tank. Even possession regulations of these and other Exotic Aquatic Species. But for just raising them for a food source in a tank my primary concern (after being in legal compliance) would be if the fish was the most healthy aquatic species I could be raising. I.e. do some research to figure this out. Tilapia taste OK to me and are easy to raise but I have read they are not super healthy compared to "Salmonidaes" like trout or possibly even fresh water clams. My brother-in-law raised tilapia in a fairly small tank (500? gallon) in his backyard. I kept a blue gill in a 5 gallon bucket with air pump for about 15 months then retuned it to the pond where my kids caught it from. This is not difficult to do.

    Possession and Transport of Exotic Aquatic Species in Texas (may be similar in other States)
    http://tpwd.texas.gov/regulations/ou...quatic-species

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    Default Aquaponics its what's for dinner

    Interesting video on Small Scale Aquaponics:



    After killing a LOT of fish you may finally have a steady supply of them to eat and a bunch of fish poop for your plants.

    Hey what's that fishy smell in your basement?

  9. #69
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    Or you can always have over-cooked, over-breaded and over-priced fish at Cap'n D's.
    When Wealth is Lost, Nothing is Lost;
    When Health is Lost, Something is Lost;
    When Character is Lost, ALL IS LOST!!!!!!!

    Colonel Charles Hyatt circa 1880

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    Quote Originally Posted by TXyakr View Post
    2 of probably over 100 great ways to cook crappie so they are not all mushy (i.e. don't use a Bass-O-Matic):



    pronounce it ˈkrä-pē not the other way

    some people believe the word originated from Canadian French dialectal crappé. (Crepe)

    Guests can not see images in the messages. Please register in the forum.

    I have never eaten carp prepared well but crappie prepared even poorly is much better, if prepared well it is the best fresh water fish I have ever eaten.

    BTW earlier I said that I returned carp to the water and do not kill because in Texas (probably other states) it is against the law to "waste" fish even non-native "trash" fish like carp or native gar etc. Killing a fish or snake etc and throwing it back into the water or up on the shore is "wasting" wildlife this is illegal. Still a violation even if you don't understand the reasoning or purpose of this law.

    "Waste of Game

    It is an offense (Class C misdemeanor) if a person while hunting kills or wounds a game bird or game animal and intentionally or knowingly fails to make a reasonable effort to retrieve the animal or bird and include it in the person's daily or seasonal bag limit. It is an offense if a person intentionally takes or possesses a game bird, game animal, or fish and intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly, or with criminal negligence, fails to keep the edible portions of the bird, animal, or fish in an edible condition. It is a Class A misdemeanor to fail to retrieve or to keep in an edible condition a whitetail or mule deer, pronghorn antelope, or desert bighorn sheep hunted without landowner consent; from a vehicle, boat, or aircraft; on a public road; at night; or with the aid of a light."


    http://tpwd.texas.gov/regulations/ou...es-restitution
    I agree with your statement about the well prepared crappie. At a shoot my local gun club has during the summer, they provide supper, and they usually have crappie and soft-shell crabs. Talk about gourmet eat'n!

  11. #71

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    mine is mangrove snapper from the fla,keys used to catch them on day off and make pan fried snapper ,cuban blackbeans and rice
    wash down with beer. when you can catch fish clean rinse flour fry stright from water it don,t get fresher than that.

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    The rough part about indoor aquaculture is evaporation and water flow. To a degree outside also. to combat this you provide more space. Very difficult to do inside on both parts.

    Outside you can have stronger louder pumps, rainfall and more space.

    Those 500 gallon food containers are pretty nice but in reality a healthy measure is 5 gallons per inch of fish. And thats with proper filtration and regular water changes, scaling past 50 gallon tanks this becomes very difficult.

    The idea of keeping 20 plus tilapia inside even in a 500 gallon tank is looking at a lot of work and setup. Doable but for healthy fish, and plants, you can easily drop 3 grand for a proper setup, and thats just material and equipment, nevermind time, space, noise, and upkeep costs.

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    Gosh, that only works out to around $150 a pound. Not bad but you had better really, really like tilapia....a lot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hayshaker View Post
    mine is mangrove snapper from the fla,keys used to catch them on day off and make pan fried snapper ,cuban blackbeans and rice
    wash down with beer. when you can catch fish clean rinse flour fry stright from water it don,t get fresher than that.
    Sounds delicious!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Gosh, that only works out to around $150 a pound. Not bad but you had better really, really like tilapia....a lot.
    Lol yeah. But with any kind of farming/ ranching there is always going to be that initial nut to swallow.

    It comes down to how self sufficient are you trying to be. The smaller your space the more $$$ you will have to spend. You could setup a nice viable aquaculture in the middle of a city, in a basement. However if you have land I would recommend putting in a decent sized pond at the bottom of a hill and letting gravity and mother nature do most of the work.

    A lady out here set up her grow beds on a hill above a pond and with a weak pump/drip system she is able to take care of her needs. The fish in her pond get feed and also scraps etc from her garden.

  16. #76

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    I eat what I can catch. Pike, bass, trout, perch, bluegill, striper, they're all the same when cooked until crispy.

  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    There are not many fresh water fish that I really like. The meat is just too mushy for me. Sorry, I can't get that mushy stuff down. Trout is nice and Salmon I do like (I'm claiming them as fresh water). Catfish fried correctly is pretty darn good, though.

    Just sharing... hate the chef.. should be light flaky and seasoned. I think we are on the same page.

    Check these frozen butts out


    Last edited by Wise Old Owl; 10-26-2015 at 11:38 PM.
    "Never work against mother nature"--Caesar Milan.

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