Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Spit poultice and bee stings

  1. #1
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Yukon River Watershed, Canada
    Posts
    1,126
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Spit poultice and bee stings

    I'm totally thrilled at how good this works! Got stung by a bee yesterday, in the soft area between my pinkie and ringfinger. I chewed up a few young willow leaves and spat them on there to act as a poultice (willow has painkilling, antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties). After 5 minutes, the pain subsided. I left the green goo on there for another 10 minutes maybe and thought no more about it - there was a very slight swelling yesterday and no more pain.
    This morning, the swelling was a lot more pronounced, the area pretty warm to the touch and hurt slightly. I thought I'd try commercial stuff on it this time, first witch hazel (cooled it for a bit, but no lasting effect), then hydrocortisone cream (took a bit of the ouch away but the area was still swollen and hot). After waiting for a more pronounced effect than this for three hours and none appearing, I went and applied another willow spit poultice, leaving it on for 30 minutes this time. Since then, the swelling has gone down, the spot is no hotter than the rest of my hand and it doesn't hurt anymore.
    Actions speak louder than words


  2. #2
    Senior Member Graf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Fenton, Michigan
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Common plantain works well also and its very abundant.
    Failing to prep, is prepping to fail!

  3. #3
    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,981

    Default

    My dad always put wet cigarette tobaco on a bee sting, and it seemed to help. Anybody else tried that?

  4. #4
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    SE/SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    16,151

    Default

    My Dad spit tobacco juice everywhere....so it worked on bee syings as i wouldn't tell him i had one.....didn't want to get slimed.

    Willow...is a "go to" in the bush, even use a twig for a tooth brush....
    BUT...had a friend cut a lot of canes, and spent a lot time stripping the bark off for some crafts....actually got sick...Dr said possible OD on the juice, thru the shin when working with it.

    Was gonna cut a bunch of them myself, last summer, for making a willow back...but the beavers beat me to them......maybe this year.
    Rubber gloves might be in order.
    Survival isn't a game...it's what you do when the game goes sideways.

  5. #5
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    49,262

    Default

    And maybe it's anecdotal. Placebo effect? Then again, if it works, who cares?

  6. #6
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Yukon River Watershed, Canada
    Posts
    1,126
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I was thinking that too. Also found out why the hydrocortisone ointment didn't do a thing: it ran off two years ago Not a problem that happens with willows! They stay right where they are.
    Actions speak louder than words

  7. #7
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    38,002
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    WildWoman - could the action of chewing the willow leaves have had some effect along with using the poultice?
    Can't Means Won't

    My Youtube Channel

  8. #8
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Yukon River Watershed, Canada
    Posts
    1,126
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Maybe as far as pain relief goes, I don't think taking willow internally would make a swelling go down, though. I take it you haven't taken the opportunity you had to try a different cure on each bee sting?
    Actions speak louder than words

  9. #9
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    38,002
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Not much willow around my area. Not sure if it would have helped or not, but certainly worth a try. I have never had a bad reaction, other than discomfort, minor swelling and itching at the sting site - but this was my first bumble bee sting. Not sure if it was the location (back of knee) but I had a great deal of difficulty walking Tuesday and Wednesday. Today there is just a little minor discomfort, but no problem walking.
    Can't Means Won't

    My Youtube Channel

  10. #10
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Yukon River Watershed, Canada
    Posts
    1,126
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Yeah, that sure is a stupid spot. I guess the more the area gets moved or compressed, the more the venom spreads. Noticed that my finger didn't take too kindly to doing laundry and stacking firewood but should be ok for paddling out in a couple days. Interesting how a sting in the wrong location can become a real handicap even without an allergy.
    Actions speak louder than words

  11. #11
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    SE/SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    16,151

    Default

    I can recall a hunting trip, that started out with a bee sting on my eye brow.....flew in the truck window, got stuck behind my glasses, swelled up some, even though I don't think I got hit real hard.

    We had just hit the road for the trip, I was riding and spent 200 miles with a poultice of mashed raw potato...that helped..... with a Benadryl, did kinda feel fine after a while.

    Willow tea is a traditional aspirin substitute....as it contains the compound aspirin is based on.

    In a similar situation I would strongly consider the willow chew and spit poultice as well..........
    http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/w...ark-000281.htm
    Thanks for posting.
    Survival isn't a game...it's what you do when the game goes sideways.

  12. #12
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    49,262

    Default

    I had a willow in my back yard. The blasted limbs were always growing down to the ground and I had to trim them back just to mow. I reached up and grabbed a handful of limbs one time and grabbed a wasp in between my fingers. I let go of everything pretty dang quick. Hurt like a son of a .... gun. That's the last time I got stung. Didn't know about willow at the time. Sort of ironic, though.

  13. #13

    Default

    I got nailed on my right ring finger by a hornet. Common plantain, msg, tobacco poultice worked well for me.

  14. #14
    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,981

    Default

    The Cherokee indians in Oklahoma mix willow leaves with buffalo poop, and make a multi purpose poultice. It attracts flies and repels musquitos and other people as well

  15. #15
    Senior Member WolfVanZandt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Broomfield, Colorado
    Posts
    605

    Default

    What started me chewing tobacco is that I was stung by a bee when I was a teenager and my landlord cut off a plug of tobacco, told me to chew it and put it on the sting. I liked the taste and it made the bee sting stop hurting.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wildthang View Post
    The Cherokee indians in Oklahoma mix willow leaves with buffalo poop, and make a multi purpose poultice. It attracts flies and repels musquitos and other people as well
    I bet that would work for chapped lips too. At least it would keep you from licking them.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •