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Thread: Can we honestly talk about this........

  1. #81
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
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    CW, I mostly agree with what you're saying here.

    I wrote my previous post to clarify that going to live and make an actual home out in the bush is not rocket science or out of reach of the average person's capabilities. IMO it's a totally different and seperate thing from "I wanna take my knife and go for x months into the bush, build a crude shelter, and spear rabbits and fish". I thought bringing up Dick Proenecke (who was not "surviving", he was living in the bush) and giving the impression that what he did is something the vast majority of people cannot do just isn't so, in my experience - I think most people don't want to actually do it.
    As you say, you have to be a doer and not just a dreamer. But that applies to whatever people do - there will always be the ones who prefer to think, talk and dream about whatever lifestyle, and those who actually do it.

    I'm absolutely with you on the survival-in-a-loincloth crowd, it just bugs me that frequently bush life (not survival!) is being portrayed as an almost unachievable feat when it's not. Maybe my view is somewhat skewed because I've been living up north for 15 years and people up here tend to be jacks and janes of all trades; there aren't very many services and that's working as a natural selection process of who can hack it, I guess.
    You're right, it is a steep learning curve and I am always advocating people try to live simply somewhere semi-remote, but with road access for a least year to pick up more skills, also www.wwoof.org is an excellent way to gain just about all the necessary homesteading skills on the planet. But if you have all this:
    -basic tool knowledge
    -basic hunting and fishing skills
    -a good work ethic
    -a backup network of friends
    -a place to do go do it (one huge challenge nowadays because it's extremly difficult to buy remote land out in the bush)
    -money
    -and most of all, enough desire and passion to go do it, and to do it right (leave the rose-tinted glasses at home and acquire the basic skills before you go),
    IMO you're good to go.

    I sidled up to bush life sideways and over a long period of years, partly because the books and documentaries out there harp on all the difficulties and the dangers. Maybe that's why it always bugs me when this comes up. I know now I could have done this even on my own. I'm all for waking people up to reality and discouraging the city slickers wanting to run off into the woods tomorrow and live off the land.
    But at the same time, it should be possible to paint a reasonable picture of what bush life (not survival) is actually like. I find it too bad if people get the impression that you have to have this vast array of hard to come by skills. In my experience, the challenge is no greater than living anywhere else - if it's new to you, it's hard at first and you gotta learn stuff. Some things are fun, others aren't. If you screw up, you may die. That applies to the burbs and city as much as bush life, it's just different sets of risk factors and challenges.
    Actions speak louder than words


  2. #82
    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildWoman View Post
    CW, I mostly agree with what you're saying here.

    I wrote my previous post to clarify that going to live and make an actual home out in the bush is not rocket science or out of reach of the average person's capabilities. IMO it's a totally different and seperate thing from "I wanna take my knife and go for x months into the bush, build a crude shelter, and spear rabbits and fish". I thought bringing up Dick Proenecke (who was not "surviving", he was living in the bush) and giving the impression that what he did is something the vast majority of people cannot do just isn't so, in my experience - I think most people don't want to actually do it.
    As you say, you have to be a doer and not just a dreamer. But that applies to whatever people do - there will always be the ones who prefer to think, talk and dream about whatever lifestyle, and those who actually do it.

    I'm absolutely with you on the survival-in-a-loincloth crowd, it just bugs me that frequently bush life (not survival!) is being portrayed as an almost unachievable feat when it's not. Maybe my view is somewhat skewed because I've been living up north for 15 years and people up here tend to be jacks and janes of all trades; there aren't very many services and that's working as a natural selection process of who can hack it, I guess.
    You're right, it is a steep learning curve and I am always advocating people try to live simply somewhere semi-remote, but with road access for a least year to pick up more skills, also www.wwoof.org is an excellent way to gain just about all the necessary homesteading skills on the planet. But if you have all this:
    -basic tool knowledge
    -basic hunting and fishing skills
    -a good work ethic
    -a backup network of friends
    -a place to do go do it (one huge challenge nowadays because it's extremly difficult to buy remote land out in the bush)
    -money
    -and most of all, enough desire and passion to go do it, and to do it right (leave the rose-tinted glasses at home and acquire the basic skills before you go),
    IMO you're good to go.

    I sidled up to bush life sideways and over a long period of years, partly because the books and documentaries out there harp on all the difficulties and the dangers. Maybe that's why it always bugs me when this comes up. I know now I could have done this even on my own. I'm all for waking people up to reality and discouraging the city slickers wanting to run off into the woods tomorrow and live off the land.
    But at the same time, it should be possible to paint a reasonable picture of what bush life (not survival) is actually like. I find it too bad if people get the impression that you have to have this vast array of hard to come by skills. In my experience, the challenge is no greater than living anywhere else - if it's new to you, it's hard at first and you gotta learn stuff. Some things are fun, others aren't. If you screw up, you may die. That applies to the burbs and city as much as bush life, it's just different sets of risk factors and challenges.
    Very true WW, you said it well. I think living in the wilderness is basically for people with loads of common sense, if you have that, you will figure it out!
    I know a few people mostly guys, that have a hard time changing a light bulb because they have absolutely no common sense, and those are the types that have no business trying to live off the grid.
    I admire people that live off the grid, and I use to think about moving off the grid myself, but as long as I can live to good life the way I am now, I am going to keep it up. Being a Jack of all trades myself, I am saving the off grid thing for if and when it becomes necessary. So I guess I just dont have the passion for that life right now, and will use my skills for when the SHTF or the economy crashes and makes it necessary.
    The thing about people like you, is that if the economy does crash, you wont notice much of a difference and everybody else will be up the creek. For you, it will be simply life as usual and no big deal!

  3. #83
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildthang View Post
    The thing about people like you, is that if the economy does crash, you wont notice much of a difference and everybody else will be up the creek. For you, it will be simply life as usual and no big deal!
    That would be nice, but I doubt it. We still have to earn an income here and for example, in May the paper I used to write for laid off half of its staff, including me. So there went 95% of my income and I haven't replaced it yet.
    I think we and a lot of other bush people wouldn't feel much of a difference if there was a short-term economic or whatever crash, say things back to "normal" in about a year. But we and everyone I know out in the woods all use fuel, run chainsaws, generators, skidoos, motorboats, buy dog food, gum boots, building supplies, food items like coffee, flour, pasta etc. So while we have more stuff stocked than town people, once that runs out, we'd have to adjust, too.
    Entirely possibly, but still quite a change because even more things would have to be done by hand than now and our food supply would shift to plenty of potatoes (and I HATE potatoes!) and wild herb teas (game and fish would stay the same, but we'd have to shoot an extra moose for the dogs).
    Actions speak louder than words

  4. #84
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildWoman View Post
    That would be nice, but I doubt it. We still have to earn an income here and for example, in May the paper I used to write for laid off half of its staff, including me. So there went 95% of my income and I haven't replaced it yet.
    I think we and a lot of other bush people wouldn't feel much of a difference if there was a short-term economic or whatever crash, say things back to "normal" in about a year. But we and everyone I know out in the woods all use fuel, run chainsaws, generators, skidoos, motorboats, buy dog food, gum boots, building supplies, food items like coffee, flour, pasta etc. So while we have more stuff stocked than town people, once that runs out, we'd have to adjust, too.
    Entirely possibly, but still quite a change because even more things would have to be done by hand than now and our food supply would shift to plenty of potatoes (and I HATE potatoes!) and wild herb teas (game and fish would stay the same, but we'd have to shoot an extra moose for the dogs).

    Noooo, say it isn't sooooo, you mean you can't just get by with knife ferro rod and a tarp?....
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  5. #85
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Pizza? No problem. Fresh pizza...now that's a different issue.

  6. #86
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    Noooo, say it isn't sooooo, you mean you can't just get by with knife ferro rod and a tarp?
    But that's what I'm on the forum for
    Actions speak louder than words

  7. #87
    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildWoman View Post
    That would be nice, but I doubt it. We still have to earn an income here and for example, in May the paper I used to write for laid off half of its staff, including me. So there went 95% of my income and I haven't replaced it yet.
    I think we and a lot of other bush people wouldn't feel much of a difference if there was a short-term economic or whatever crash, say things back to "normal" in about a year. But we and everyone I know out in the woods all use fuel, run chainsaws, generators, skidoos, motorboats, buy dog food, gum boots, building supplies, food items like coffee, flour, pasta etc. So while we have more stuff stocked than town people, once that runs out, we'd have to adjust, too.
    Entirely possibly, but still quite a change because even more things would have to be done by hand than now and our food supply would shift to plenty of potatoes (and I HATE potatoes!) and wild herb teas (game and fish would stay the same, but we'd have to shoot an extra moose for the dogs).
    Yeah you would feel the crunch, but people in big cities would have a much harder time than you. At least you can go out and get food, but in the city there are no moose!

  8. #88
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildthang
    but in the city there are no moose


    Thank goodness. I have to dodge deer and coyote the way it is. I don't need to be dodgin' moose. Especially those amorous ones that don't want to give up ground.

  9. #89
    Senior Member Ted's Avatar
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    Default To the mod squad...Rick, Crash, Sarge.

    I certainly didn't mean to offend you or the any of the forum members. I'm sorry you felt you had to defend the sight and how you manage it. I'm very impressed and even complimented on you guys on it during some past opinion wars.

    When I read Wildthangs post I did get a little excited. He said how I felt perfectly. I hope a few litttle Ted's didn't get ran off. This is the best place for them.
    I'm a simple man, of simple means, turned my back on the machines, to follow my dreams.

  10. #90
    walk lightly on the earth wildWoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildthang View Post
    At least you can go out and get food, but in the city there are no moose!
    I hear rats can get pretty big, though And there's lots of 'em.
    Actions speak louder than words

  11. #91
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted View Post
    I certainly didn't mean to offend you or the any of the forum members. I'm sorry you felt you had to defend the sight and how you manage it. I'm very impressed and even complimented on you guys on it during some past opinion wars.

    When I read Wildthangs post I did get a little excited. He said how I felt perfectly. I hope a few litttle Ted's didn't get ran off. This is the best place for them.
    You certainly didn't offend me - we were just having a conversation.
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  12. #92
    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
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    Cool well now...

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted View Post
    I certainly didn't mean to offend you or the any of the forum members. I'm sorry you felt you had to defend the sight and how you manage it. I'm very impressed and even complimented on you guys on it during some past opinion wars.

    When I read Wildthangs post I did get a little excited. He said how I felt perfectly. I hope a few litttle Ted's didn't get ran off. This is the best place for them.
    Why would I get offended for you speaking your opinion? Sometimes it helps to clear the air!

    (now let's see, where did I put that "ban" button?)
    SARGE
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  13. #93
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    No blood, no foul, my friend. You or anyone else are welcome to express your opinion at any time. Adults should be able to discuss things or even disagree without hurt feelings and that's how I saw it.

  14. #94
    Senior Member Bushman's Avatar
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    If I post something wrong then I expect to be called on it. You're actually doing me and everyone else a favor. I get to learn something, which I love to do, and everyone gets the benefit of correct info. I see that as a win/win.

    when you STOP Learning it is technically defined as 'being D-E-A-D'.........

    the older I get (and I'm over 60..) the lesser I KNOW...............

    some of the **** I once 'knew-for-sure'...............waaaalllll , I 'ain't so sure no moah'..............

    the old fellas told me this when I were a mere boy..........and its ONLY now I'm startin to figger they were RIGHT !!
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  15. #95
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    If I've gotten off the beaten path then somebody give me a verbal "kick in the pants". I want to throw out so much advice but fight the urge. I've learned an unbelievable amount from these forums. I try to either just ad to a conversation or give advice when someone posts for it specifically. And then if it's something I actually do to a point that my advice is based on first hand experience and knowledge, not because I think I'm an "expert". That's the time for all to ignore me.
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  16. #96
    Senior Member old2531's Avatar
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    you all are great if a person cant accept critisism they dont belong in open forums im an old fogie too but im smart enough each of us has a skill we all could use so i sit back and learn ty everyone for openning my mind to many ideas

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