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Thread: Big Bend knife (new model)

  1. #1
    Devout Neophyte Bush Monkey's Avatar
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    Default Big Bend knife (new model)

    Big Bend: 10" OAL, O1 tool steel, 5"x1.5" x 3/16" blade, saber bevel, heat treat finish, green jade ghost G10, stainless corby bolts and flared brass tube.


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    Simplicity is the ultimate form of sophistication.


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    Senior Member Kamel's Avatar
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    Thats sexy. Nice, youre in fort worth, I grew up in Azle Texas.

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    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    When did the scandi grind start being called a sabre grind?
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    Devout Neophyte Bush Monkey's Avatar
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    Good question...thank you. However, a better question might be: "When did a saber grind start being called a scandi grind?

    I stopped using the term "scandi" about the time I decided that I did not like the term. The fact is, both are almost identical - the saber comes up higher on the blade of a saber simply because the stock is thicker.

    Saber aka Scandi

    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    When did the scandi grind start being called a sabre grind?
    FYI: http://mtknives.wordpress.com/2011/1...ype-of-grinds/

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    1. Hollow grind:a knife blade which has been ground to create a characteristic concave, beveled cutting edge along. This is characteristic of straight razors, used for shaving, and yields a very sharp but weak edge which requires stropping for maintenance.
    2. Flat grind: The blade tapers all the way from the spine to the edge from both sides. A lot of metal is removed from the blade and is thus more difficult to grind, one factor that limits its commercial use. It sacrifices edge durability in favor of more sharpness. The Finnish puukko is an example of a flat ground knife. A true, flat ground knife having only a single bevel is somewhat of a rarity.
    3. Sabre grind: Similar to a flat grind blade except that the bevel starts at about the middle of the blade, not the spine. Also named "Scandinavian Grind", it produces a more lasting edge at the expense of some cutting ability and is typical of kitchen knives. 4. Chisel grind: As on a chisel, only one side is ground (often at an edge angle of about 20 – 30); the other remains flat. As many Japanese culinary knives tend to be chisel ground they are often sharper than a typical double bevelled Western culinary knife. (A chisel grind has only a single edge angle. If a sabre grind blade has the same edge angle as a chisel grind, it still has two edges and thus has twice the included angle.) Knives which are chisel ground come in left and right-handed varieties, depending upon which side is ground.
    5. Double bevel or compound bevel: A back bevel, similar to a sabre or flat grind, is put on the blade behind the edge bevel (the bevel which is the foremost cutting surface). This back bevel keeps the section of blade behind the edge thinner which improves cutting ability. Being less acute at the edge than a single bevel, sharpness is sacrificed for resilience: such a grind is much less prone to chipping or rolling than a single bevel blade. In practice, double bevels are common in a variety of edge angles and back bevel angles, and Western kitchen knives generally have a double bevel, with an edge angle of 20–22 (included angle of 40–44).
    6. Convex grind: Rather than tapering with straight lines to the edge, the taper is curved, though in the opposite manner to a hollow grind. Such a shape keeps a lot of metal behind the edge making for a stronger edge while still allowing a good degree of sharpness. This grind can be used on axes and is sometimes called an axe grind. As the angle of the taper is constantly changing this type of grind requires some degree of skill to reproduce on a flat stone. Convex blades usually need to be made from thicker stock than other blades.
    Last edited by Bush Monkey; 07-15-2012 at 08:28 PM.
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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Great looking knife.
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    Senior Member Winter's Avatar
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    Great knife.

    What's the deal on the handle material? There has to something uglier than that out there.

    Just messing with ya, I know alot of makers out there use the stuff. Some nice stabilized dark wood would look awesome on that.
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    Devout Neophyte Bush Monkey's Avatar
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    lol

    Thanks for taking a look and adding some levity to knifemaking.

    Jeff

    Quote Originally Posted by Winter View Post
    Great knife.

    What's the deal on the handle material? There has to something uglier than that out there.

    Just messing with ya, I know alot of makers out there use the stuff. Some nice stabilized dark wood would look awesome on that.
    Simplicity is the ultimate form of sophistication.

  8. #8

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    Yea looks great Jeff, I like it.
    I almost have to agree......some black G10 would be great , LOL
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    Senior Member Skinner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winter View Post
    Great knife.

    What's the deal on the handle material? There has to something uglier than that out there.

    Just messing with ya, I know alot of makers out there use the stuff. Some nice stabilized dark wood would look awesome on that.
    I Like the Look Of green jade ghost G10 And If you Use a Toxic Green Or Even a Red Or Blue Line It Pops Really Nice .
    But ,I do Love Some Wood Scales .
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  10. #10
    Not a Mod finallyME's Avatar
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    I love the scales. Don't listen to the naysayers. I saw a pretty decent explanation on the difference between a scandi and sabre on bladeforums or something like that. Maybe google will yield results.
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  11. #11
    Devout Neophyte Bush Monkey's Avatar
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    Thanks for looking and taking the time to comment. Scale color is damn close to being an afterthought with me. I spend most of my (limited) brainwork trying to keep things clean and simple.

    Quote Originally Posted by finallyME View Post
    I love the scales. Don't listen to the naysayers. I saw a pretty decent explanation on the difference between a scandi and sabre on bladeforums or something like that. Maybe google will yield results.
    Simplicity is the ultimate form of sophistication.

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