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Thread: Plant identification needed

  1. #1

    Default Plant identification needed

    Full grown and flowering they are about 18"-2' tall. I've thumbed through Peterson, Edible wild plants; Peterson, Medicinal plants; Audubon, Eastern Edition wild flowers and Wildflowers of Tenn, Ohio Valley and Southern Appalachians. To this point I've found nothing that looks similar.

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  2. #2
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Did you pull up the roots? Looks similar to Queen Anne's Lace.........or Poison Hemlock.
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  3. #3

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    I don't think it's either. I can identify Queen Ann's Lace and Poison Hemlock has a purple tint on the stem with a compound leaf. This is a single leaf from the stalk that resembles a small fern leaf. The flower does resemble the poison hemlock in many ways but is much smaller.

    Hemlock grows 3-8 feet tall. We have some along the creek. I'm gonna watch these anyway to see what they do since you made your suggestion.
    Poison_Hemlock3.JPG

    wfshl-waterhemlock-01a_small.jpg
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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    I'm a neophyte when it comes to wild edibles. There are quite a few folks here that are very knowledgeable in that arena.
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    Yarrow, if I were to venture a guess. Good mosquito repellant. I take that back, A better than nothing mosquito repellant

  6. #6
    Senior Member cowgirlup's Avatar
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    Geron, It looks to be false queen annes lace. The real queen annes lace/wild carrot has smaller flowers in the cluster and a dark spot in the center.

    The hemlock is all over the place up here and has different leaves. Funny though the groundhogs will eat the hemlock flowers. Wish it would kill them.
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    Idk CGU. Hemlock has a whitish bloom on the stalk and more than one umbrel branching off the stalk and lavender streaks. The leaves also tend to be wider. Perhaps geron could offer more particulars? But I would look up Yarrow first. JMOFWIW.

  8. #8

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    Bingo! MountainMark. I'll watch it as it develops. However, I'm confident enough to use it as Yarrow based on Google images and the descriptions in my various wildflower books. Thanks!! Learned a new flower today !! We don't have a whole lot of it around so it caught my eye when I walked by.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    I think yarrow too although in my area of northern michigan the leaves of yarrow are a bit more course than other places.
    Last edited by randyt; 05-26-2012 at 06:16 AM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member cowgirlup's Avatar
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    Didn't think of Yarrow without seeing the base leaves. I have some in the herb garden but it never gets that tall. Must be some kinda southern yarrow.

    I didn't think it was hemlock. Only that the flower was a little similar.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirlup View Post
    Didn't think of Yarrow without seeing the base leaves. I have some in the herb garden but it never gets that tall. Must be some kinda southern yarrow.

    I didn't think it was hemlock. Only that the flower was a little similar.


    Ahhhh, sorry CGU. I missundertood.

  12. #12
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    Definately not queen anne's lace, or poison hemlock. I'll go out and look in my books and get back to you in a little while. For now I'm going with yarrow also.

  13. #13

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    I know its an older thread, but that is Yarrow. I used to get annoyed when I was collecting queen annes lace flowers to make jelly because I would see the Yarrow heads from a distance walk up and realize they were not queen annes lace. Now I know better and know that Yarrow is a better find than queen annes lace.

    I collect yarrow (both the leaves & flowers) and dry for tea, there are many MANY uses for yarrow medicinally, and its not a bad herb to have on hand.

  14. #14
    Senior Member gryffynklm's Avatar
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    Late to the party but put me down for Yarrow.
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