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Thread: Can anyone ID this?

  1. #1
    Junior Member mwshadow's Avatar
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    Default Can anyone ID this?

    Don't worry. I have no intention of eating this. I just came across it and was curious.

    Can anyone tell me what this is?
    shroom.jpg
    I've not yet begun to procrastinate!


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    hmmmmm.......
    Not sure.

    You are in Ms. so I might not have it here.

    Does it have pores or gills? What color spore print? What was it growing on? If on a tree, what kind of tree?

    Maybe someone on here can tell you at first glance, but not me.

  3. #3
    Junior Member mwshadow's Avatar
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    It was growing on the ground beside a popcorn tree with some oak and pine nearby. It didn't have gills.
    I've not yet begun to procrastinate!

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    Senior Member cowgirlup's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwshadow View Post
    It was growing on the ground beside a popcorn tree with some oak and pine nearby. It didn't have gills.
    Huh. No clue.

    Hey Mark! We are livin in the wrong state. They got POPCORN TREES in Mississippi!!!!
    "I enjoy surviving." Yes, well I certainly hope so as the other side of that is "DEATH!"
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirlup View Post
    Huh. No clue.

    Hey Mark! We are livin in the wrong state. They got POPCORN TREES in Mississippi!!!!
    Yes, but they have chiggers!

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Wait a second!!!!

    You've got popcorn growing on trees? That does it --- I'm coming to Mississippi.
    Can't Means Won't

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    The gators use the popcorn as bait.

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    Senior Member tjwilhelm's Avatar
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    Looks to me like some type of "shelf fungus." Do a Google image search for "shelf fungus" and you may find it there.

    TQSR_Lg_13_06.jpg

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    I was thinking it looked a bit like dye makers polypore but that is a fall mushroom I think. I'll have to keep looking I guess.

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Canid is a fungus guru of sorts. Hopefully he will check in and give a response.
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    Junior Member mwshadow's Avatar
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    Wow. To be known as a fungus guru. I can only dream.
    I've not yet begun to procrastinate!

  12. #12

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    Looks like an Oyster Fungus; Were the tops Blue/Blue Grey?
    It usually grows on Trees, as a shelf fungus.

    Pieurotus Ostreatus: (Oyster Fungus)
    Grows in clumps with deep blue grey shelf shaped caps. 2 1/2" - 5 3/4" wide
    White gills and white rubbery flesh.
    On Broad-Leaved trees for most of the year.
    Tasty Slice and stew. Also dries well.

    Stolen from the SAS Survival Guide by John 'Lofty' Wiseman
    P162 - 163

    He also makes a good novice rule of thumb on one of his You-Tube videos.
    When Shrooming if the fungus grows above your waist on a tree it's OK.
    If it grows on the ground, leave it.
    Last edited by jcullen24; 05-22-2012 at 10:57 AM.
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  13. #13
    Junior Member mwshadow's Avatar
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    I know nothing about mushrooms, but the closest I could find is Trametes versicolor.

    The shroom was meaty and shredded. The top was bluish gray.

    As for the popcorn trees... they may well be produce real popcorn, but those darn gators won't let me get close.
    I've not yet begun to procrastinate!

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    Well folks, I may not know this mushroom, but two mushrooms it definitely is not, is the oyster (pleurotus ostreatus) wich has gills and grows on trees and doesn't look like the mushroom in the photo, and Trametes versicolor (turkey tail) wich is thin and leathery. Where is that Canid person? I want to meet him (her)

  15. #15

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    It looks like fungus or a mushroom.
    ???????????

  16. #16
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    See? She knows. What's so tough about that? Nice job CD.

  17. #17
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    First of all; this certainly looks to be a polypore. does the underside appear to the naked eye to be smooth, or to be a surface composed of small to minuscule pores?

    describe to me the size of these pores if you can. describe or take a photo of the edges of the caps. describe the texture. damage the flesh of the underside near the edge of one of the caps. observe any color change that occurs within an hour. describe the scent.

    they look like a good candidate for immature Grifola frondosa. This is not yet and identification.

    they look to be a can
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  18. #18
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    also; i don't know where you guys are getting this notion that P. oystreatus is blue. that mushroom has a cap which is brown to grey brown, or occasionally pale reddish brown, generally becomming paler as it matures. there may have been some collections with a blue-grey or purplish-grey hue (e.g. the collection isolated for the famous 'blue oyster' strain popular among cultivators), but this is not to my knowledge common in any locality.
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    Quote Originally Posted by canid View Post
    First of all; this certainly looks to be a polypore. does the underside appear to the naked eye to be smooth, or to be a surface composed of small to minuscule pores?

    describe to me the size of these pores if you can. describe or take a photo of the edges of the caps. describe the texture. damage the flesh of the underside near the edge of one of the caps. observe any color change that occurs within an hour. describe the scent.

    they look like a good candidate for immature Grifola frondosa. This is not yet and identification.


    they look to be a can
    Canid! glad you showed up

    My first thought is that I would be very surprised if this were Grifola Frondosa, based on the image provided and the fact that here in NH (I know, very differrent location) They are not found until the black trumpets are gone in the fall and the porcini is winding down. The oak nearby would be the typical substrate for that mushroom however.

    As far as bluish oysters go, I find them quite frequently here. They are certainly a different variety from the more common grey/brown ones but most guides tend to lump them all together into P. oystreatus. The blue variety, as you say, may very well be the escaped cultivated variety. We call it "Blue pearl oyster" around here. It grows only on dead maple in the fall. But then I am about three thousand miles away from you. If you ever find it, I think you'll enjoy it. It is my wifes favorite

    Always a pleasure to meet a fellow enthusiast. Be well, mark

  20. #20
    Junior Member mwshadow's Avatar
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    The underside appeared smooth. It was thick and when damaged tended to shred rather than break. I don't have access to it any longer to check for more than I can remember.
    I've not yet begun to procrastinate!

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