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Thread: Freezing your Mushrooms

  1. #1
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    Default Freezing your Mushrooms

    Alot of folks ask me about mushrooms! They wanna know what they can do to sustain their mushroom supply for later months. Easy.....Read below....


    You can freeze mushrooms, but it will take a little extra effort on your part! Do not just throw them in the freezer and hope for the best, instead try following these instructions from cooks.com:

    Freezing Raw (Freeze whole, for use within 3 months) :

    Choose very fresh mushrooms; wipe with a clean cloth to remove dirt. Place each a little apart on a baking tray and open-freeze as quickly as possible. When mushrooms are frozen, pack into containers, fit on a lid and replace in freezer. Use within 3 months. Use straight from the freezer for pies, casseroles or stews or thaw for about 1 hour and use as required.

    Freezing, Par-boiled:

    Wash raw mushrooms. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt to 1 quart rapidly boiling water. To keep mushrooms white, add 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice to water. Add mushrooms. Let water come to a boil again. Boil mushrooms 3 minutes. Rinse with cold water. Drain thoroughly. Seal in plastic bags. Freeze. Will keep about one year.

    Freezing Sauteed Mushrooms:

    Saute 1 lb. of mushrooms in butter with salt and pepper, using high heat for 1 or 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Cool, then store in small containers and freeze. Use frozen, or thaw to room temperature about one hour; use for omelettes, sauces or served on toast.

    Good luck & good eating!
    --GiLLiGaNN--


  2. #2
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Good info. Thanks for posting that. I assume the par boiling will kill the enzymes much as it does with green beens and other veggies. Had never thought about it but makes sense. Thanks!

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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Never had much luck freezing mushrooms........sorta tuned gray and mush.....Must have done something wrong.
    Cooking them first seems to work.
    Old Mountain man saying, The more ya know, the less ya have to carry.

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    If you have the money, buy yourself some liquid nitrogen. Use it to flash freeze sensitive veggies and meats. It will freeze everything fast enough so that ice crystals don't rip cell walls causing mush as it thaws. The longer it takes something to freeze, the more damage is done due to large ice crystals. Yay science and foodnetwork... lol

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    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Yeah, right......like that's gonna happen....LOL, good thought though.
    Old Mountain man saying, The more ya know, the less ya have to carry.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Every time I see that title I keep thinking it's about hunting in the cold and freezing your.....well, it's really cold.

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    Off Grid! Darkevs's Avatar
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    sliced and dried works best for me.

    Then when i want I just add the dried mushrooms to soups, stews, sauces, etc.

    I also make dog treats out of Pine (Matsutake) mushrooms.................I slice and dry them first.then i rehydrate them in some homemade beef broth...then dry them again...Dogs love them! Good trail food for people too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darkevs View Post
    sliced and dried works best for me.

    Then when i want I just add the dried mushrooms to soups, stews, sauces, etc.

    I also make dog treats out of Pine (Matsutake) mushrooms.................I slice and dry them first.then i rehydrate them in some homemade beef broth...then dry them again...Dogs love them! Good trail food for people too.
    Really??? You use White Matsutake to feed your dogs? You must really love your dogs...... Do you know what those are selling for? Last I heard they were selling for up to $600 per pound. I wouldn't sell them myself, I would eat them, as they are delicious......But for the dogs? I'm not sure they have a refined enough palate to really enjoy them. Our family dog seems perfectly content on cow chips and rotten meat, but hey, to each their own. I like your idea of rehydrating them in stock and drying them again, I may have to try that one some time. I hope you are using that broth for a soup base afterwords. Nothing quite like mushroom water

    I have tried freezing greenbacks raw with good results and sauteed parasols freeze well. Mostly I dry my extra mushrooms as they will keep longest this way, and I have grown accustomed to using them in this manner. Good info, thanks for sharing!

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    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
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    I find dehydrating works so well I don't bother freezing,especially when they dry so quickly.
    Soular powered by the son.

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    Senior Member Winnie's Avatar
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    +1 Nell. They keep for much longer too.
    Recession; A period when you go without something your Grandparents never heard of.

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