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Thread: Our New Place

  1. #21
    Senior Member SARKY's Avatar
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    Great find, I have always liked the idea of a living roof. I'm looking for some land myself in the NE corner of AZ. Want to put in a Monolithic dome (2 story) with the first story in the ground like a basement then earth berm the second story.
    I know what hunts you.


  2. #22
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    YCC. Makes me happy to see you and your family find a place like that. You said in the OP that there is nothing there yet but trees and snakes and maybe a few turtles. Well my friend it sounds to me like it is full of you and your families dreams. Can one really ask for more these days? Best of luck with your new purchase Buddy.

    Oldtrap
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  3. #23
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    Thanks OT. It is what I've dreamed of for a long time. I wish the spot were a little larger, but I'll take what I can get! Most "woods" around here are only woods because it is swampy land that floods when it rains. Otherwise it'd be clear-cut farmland. We consider ourselves very lucky. The kids love tromping through the woods-that-have-no-trails (the older ones wouldn't sit still long enough for me to get a picture of them) and having our own "camping area". I'm supposed to meet with the well-digger today to talk prices. If the money is right, we will be getting water out there in a few months.
    We truly could not ask for more!

  4. #24
    Off Grid! Darkevs's Avatar
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    Awesome place you have found!!!

    Have fun making it yours and working with your land, not against it.

    The world needs more bees!

  5. #25
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    Update: Talked with the well-digger. The water table at our new place is very high, only about 35-45 feet down. Sounds reasonable. Here's the catch.
    The ground underneath is very sandy and there will be a lot of sediment in the lines if we don't go down past the sand and actually penetrate into the aquifer. He recommended we go 100 feet down, and since we need casing and all, plus the mechanics for the hand-pump well, we are looking at around $5500.
    It'll be more than a couple months before we get water. On the bright side, I'll be making my last truck payment next week, so that'll be $400 a month extra we can put back. I figure by the time we get it cleaned up enough to actually get the drill-truck in there, we should have enough saved to put the well down.

  6. #26
    Lone Wolf COWBOYSURVIVAL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by your_comforting_company View Post
    Update: Talked with the well-digger. The water table at our new place is very high, only about 35-45 feet down. Sounds reasonable. Here's the catch.
    The ground underneath is very sandy and there will be a lot of sediment in the lines if we don't go down past the sand and actually penetrate into the aquifer. He recommended we go 100 feet down, and since we need casing and all, plus the mechanics for the hand-pump well, we are looking at around $5500.
    It'll be more than a couple months before we get water. On the bright side, I'll be making my last truck payment next week, so that'll be $400 a month extra we can put back. I figure by the time we get it cleaned up enough to actually get the drill-truck in there, we should have enough saved to put the well down.
    Check to see if any one has a well close by and see how deep, water quality, etc., at least I would. A deep well would be nice but it might be that you can start out with a shallow well and then upgrade.
    Keep in mind the problem may be extremely complicated, though the "Fix" is often simple...

    "Teaching a child to fish is the "original" introduction to all that is wild." CS

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  7. #27
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    He told me about a fella up the road, who is actually closer to the creek. That's the one he was talking about 100 feet and still gets sand.
    It's funny that the well is going to cost over twice what we paid for the land haha.
    As far as water quality, I've been drinking the water in that creek all my life and it's delicious. The underground water has to be good! My dad's well, near there is very good water and always nice and cold.

  8. #28
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    My deep well/pump at "The Place" cost me $4500 bucks in 2005....185 ft w/6" case and grouted to 95 ft, and is state approved.....got silt for a while, but has been running clear for a couple of years.
    Congrats, a little at a time, and it will get done.
    Last edited by hunter63; 05-11-2012 at 02:28 PM. Reason: splin'
    Old Mountain man saying, The more ya know, the less ya have to carry.

  9. #29
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    Looks like a real nice piece of terra firma. Congrats!

    Just noticed your posts about the well. My BIL does well installation & repair. I've helped him with a number of jobs over the years from windmills to 5 hp submersibles. I guess you could say I'm experienced, but not an expert. My question to you is, why should sand or sediment be an issue for a hand pump? Seems to me like your draw rate likely wouldn't exceed 3 or 4 gallons a minute. And that's if you're really determined to "go for the record". I look at greater depth like an added insurance policy against man-made contaminants. The price you were quoted is less than you would probably have to pay here, so nice score!
    Last edited by Cast-Iron; 05-11-2012 at 05:11 PM.

  10. #30
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    Good Info CI. Mr. Teal's hand pump well drew about a gallon each pump. It will be our primary drinking and irrigation water for a while, so I want it to be done right. I also don't want the sand and sediment eating up the seals in the pump. I don't know much about the innards of a hand-pump, but I reckon there has to be stuff in there that doesn't like grit.
    By this time next year we will have one. Sonny has done a lot of good well-work around these parts, and warranties his work. He's fixed my grandma's well a year later for free, so I'm probably going with him, even if he is a little more expensive.

  11. #31
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    Are you sure about the gallon per stroke rate? You piqued my curiosity with that comment, so I found a little information from one hand pump manufacturer.

    http://www.bisonpumps.com/output.pdf

    Your production is largely determined by three factors; 1) cylinder size, 2) static water level, and 3) physical stamina. If you will note for their 3" cylinder with a static level of 0, production is approximated at only 4.5 to 5 gpm with a stroke output of 20 oz.. This is more in line with the production I have seen with my limited experience. I would expect the water you are pumping will have been within the water column of the well casing long enough for most heavy particulates to settle out. So with only modest levels of water extraction the grit shouldn't be much of an issue. The pumping mechanics are similar to a windmill with a sucker rod inside of your drop pipe connected to a pump cylinder. You will most likely have a maintenance issue requiring you to periodically pull the pump cylinder to replace the "leathers".
    Last edited by Cast-Iron; 05-12-2012 at 05:35 PM.

  12. #32
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    yet again. I made a nice long post, only for the page to "not responding". I'll retype the @$#^@#$^^%%^&& reply sometime or other.
    annoyed.

  13. #33
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    http://www.baker-mfg.com/domestic_ne...and_pumps.html

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