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Thread: Ate my first cricket!

  1. #1
    Member RoadLessTraveled's Avatar
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    Default Ate my first cricket!

    Okay, folks. It's one of those things that, you know, you just always kinda wonder about but never muster the courage to actually try...

    Well, last weekend, I had the perfect opportunity. I attended the Insecta Fiesta hosted by UT here in Austin. It was heavily seasoned, so I didn't get to experience any natural flavor (for better or worse).

    One small step for wild edible enthusiasts, one giant leap for this nube.

    Here are a few pictures of my adventure:

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    Off Grid! Darkevs's Avatar
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    yummy!

    I have accidently eaten a few unidentified bugs over the years ........still have not eaten one on purpose, but I suppose If I was lost and hungry I would! Thinking crunchy bugs might be easier to eat than big squishy, gooey grubs.

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    Senior Member grrlscout's Avatar
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    Nice! I have been meaning to stop at a local Mexican grocery that specialized in Oaxacan goods, to buy some crickets, but I keep forgetting.

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    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    Congrats! My first one was cheddar flavor. Next was Bar-B-Que. Now it is time for the live ones!
    ”There's nothing glorious in dying. Anyone can do it.” ~Johnny Rotten

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    Grubbin fer food Durtyoleman's Avatar
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    My folks taught me to try new things and the army taught me almost anything is edible, BUT bugs and worms top my list of things that get eaten after the family pets but before people.
    D.O.M.

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    I've ridden cross country on a motorcycle five times. Eating bugs ain't no big deal.........maybe that's why I never felt like stopping for lunch.
    Can't Means Won't

    My Youtube Channel

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    Member RoadLessTraveled's Avatar
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    Funny! Pickin' and a grinnin'!

    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    I've ridden cross country on a motorcycle five times. Eating bugs ain't no big deal.........maybe that's why I never felt like stopping for lunch.

  8. #8
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I find it interesting that the majority of the world's citizens eat bug on a daily basis and we shoo flies off our picnic. Nice job on the cricket.

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    Senior Member RandyRhoads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by natertot View Post
    Congrats! My first one was cheddar flavor. Next was Bar-B-Que. Now it is time for the live ones!

    I wouldn't eat any live grasshoppers/crickets. They're supposedly all riddled with parasites.

  10. #10
    Member RoadLessTraveled's Avatar
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    Thanks Rick,

    I share your view point. Probably most of those who eat them are doing it by necessity and not preference. But the fact that people eat them proves that there's nothing inherently wrong or unhealthy about eating insects. On the contrary, since they are so readily available and such a good source of nutrition, it actually seems like a waste to not eat them! Instead of feeling squeamish, we should be as thankful for them as we are when our fields are full of grain?

    I'm just talking the talk right now. There's not a single cricket in my freezer. But the more I think about it, the less of a good reason I can find for excluding insects from my diet...

    It seems to me that the strong repulsion that most of us have towards insects is something we've learned, not something instinctive.

    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...810336,00.html

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I find it interesting that the majority of the world's citizens eat bug on a daily basis and we shoo flies off our picnic. Nice job on the cricket.
    Last edited by RoadLessTraveled; 04-24-2012 at 06:10 PM.

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    Member RoadLessTraveled's Avatar
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    Is anyone aware of any harmful parasites in specific?

    Sincerely, I am interested in learning what are the risks associated with eating insects for my own benefit. And I'm also interested in dispelling any misconceptions.

    The most common parasite in crickets that I've learned about so far is the Horsehair Worm. But it is completely harmless for humans:

    http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2112.html
    Fears are not warranted since horsehair worms can only parasitize suitable insect hosts.
    http://www.extension.umn.edu/yardand...horsehair.html
    Horsehair worms are harmless to people, pets, and plants.
    http://www.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/ef613.asp
    These interesting creatures are not parasites of humans, livestock, or pets and pose no public health threat.


    Quote Originally Posted by RandyRhoads View Post
    I wouldn't eat any live grasshoppers/crickets. They're supposedly all riddled with parasites.
    Last edited by RoadLessTraveled; 04-24-2012 at 06:09 PM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member RandyRhoads's Avatar
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    Tapeworm. There is also a danger if you eat the legs without cooking and grinding into powder. They have barbs that can get stuck in your throat.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Randy, Randy, Randy. Where did you come up with that? First, you'll have to give me a source on tapeworms in insects. Never heard of it. There are only four that infect humans. faeces, beef, fish and dwarf. None of them get stuck in the throat. They live either in the upper or lower GI tract.

    As to your question RLT, there are a lot of parasites that feed on crickets and grasshoppers. I'm not sure how many of those are a pest to man. Nematodes, mites, ricketsia (does infect humans), Protista (there are oodles of Protista but the most commonly known is protozoa). I would hazard a guess that at least some of the Protista would impact humans. There is even a parasitic wasp that lays its eggs inside crickets so you could get a little extra protein from the larvae. The good news is cooking kills the parasites. Don't forget to remove the legs and wings!

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    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Randy, Randy, Randy. Where did you come up with that? First, you'll have to give me a source on tapeworms in insects. Never heard of it. There are only four that infect humans. faeces, beef, fish and dwarf. None of them get stuck in the throat. They live either in the upper or lower GI tract.

    As to your question RLT, there are a lot of parasites that feed on crickets and grasshoppers. I'm not sure how many of those are a pest to man. Nematodes, mites, ricketsia (does infect humans), Protista (there are oodles of Protista but the most commonly known is protozoa). I would hazard a guess that at least some of the Protista would impact humans. There is even a parasitic wasp that lays its eggs inside crickets so you could get a little extra protein from the larvae. The good news is cooking kills the parasites. Don't forget to remove the legs and wings!
    So eat away! just hold a match to em for a bit first and remove extremeties. What about crickets? Can we eat those too? I have a ton of those in my yard. Way more than grasshoppers.
    ”There's nothing glorious in dying. Anyone can do it.” ~Johnny Rotten

  15. #15
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I'm....going....to.....take.....this.....slow....f or.....you....

    As to your question RLT, there are a lot of parasites that feed on crickets and grasshoppers. I'm not sure how many of those are a pest to man. Nematodes, mites, ricketsia (does infect humans), Protista (there are oodles of Protista but the most commonly known is protozoa). I would hazard a guess that at least some of the Protista would impact humans. There is even a parasitic wasp that lays its eggs inside crickets so you could get a little extra protein from the larvae. The good news is cooking kills the parasites. Don't forget to remove the legs and wings!

    I'm post cartoons next time.

    Is there something in the water in SW Ohio or do you guys just congregate there?

  16. #16
    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I'm....going....to.....take.....this.....slow....f or.....you....

    As to your question RLT, there are a lot of parasites that feed on crickets and grasshoppers. I'm not sure how many of those are a pest to man. Nematodes, mites, ricketsia (does infect humans), Protista (there are oodles of Protista but the most commonly known is protozoa). I would hazard a guess that at least some of the Protista would impact humans. There is even a parasitic wasp that lays its eggs inside crickets so you could get a little extra protein from the larvae. The good news is cooking kills the parasites. Don't forget to remove the legs and wings!

    I'm post cartoons next time.

    Is there something in the water in SW Ohio or do you guys just congregate there?
    Sorry, I was thinking grasshoppers. I had a dummy moment. Maybe I'l get with Kyrat and we can open our own restaurant. KFC, Kentucky Fried Crickets!
    ”There's nothing glorious in dying. Anyone can do it.” ~Johnny Rotten

  17. #17
    Senior Member RandyRhoads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Randy, Randy, Randy. Where did you come up with that? First, you'll have to give me a source on tapeworms in insects. Never heard of it. There are only four that infect humans. faeces, beef, fish and dwarf. None of them get stuck in the throat. They live either in the upper or lower GI tract.

    As to your question RLT, there are a lot of parasites that feed on crickets and grasshoppers. I'm not sure how many of those are a pest to man. Nematodes, mites, ricketsia (does infect humans), Protista (there are oodles of Protista but the most commonly known is protozoa). I would hazard a guess that at least some of the Protista would impact humans. There is even a parasitic wasp that lays its eggs inside crickets so you could get a little extra protein from the larvae. The good news is cooking kills the parasites. Don't forget to remove the legs and wings!
    .......wow.... I was talking about the grasshopper legs getting stuck in the throat, not the tapeworm........the hell........lol........




    .............


    "Raw grasshoppers should be eaten with caution, as they may contain tapeworms."

    Source- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grasshopper
    Last edited by RandyRhoads; 04-25-2012 at 12:58 AM.

  18. #18
    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
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    I am going to save the bugs until the world food supply is gone, or I'm lost without food and they are the only thing to eat! They will probably be tha last remaining food source on earth and I dont want them going extint any sooner than necessary

  19. #19
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I did misread your post. My most humble apologies on the throat thingie.

    Thank you for the link. I have never seen a reference to tapeworms in insects. Got to love a learning moment!!!! Thanks!

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    Off Grid! Darkevs's Avatar
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    never seen a reference to tapeworm in insects?

    fleas serve as carriers of tapeworm..............

    so make sure your crickets do not have fleas. hahahahah

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