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Thread: Smokin' Kinnikinnick (Uva usri)

  1. #21
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    Haha, I dont think they realize I asked if anyone HAD smoked it, not havn't. Anyway, who in the world "abuses" kinnikinnick haha. Nice pictures, ours up here in Oregon arent flowering, i think its too cold yet. Im excited to see how it is. I wouldn't crush and dry though, you will lose flavor if it's not dried whole-leaf.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kortoso View Post
    Attachment 7457Attachment 7458
    Some shots of A. uva-ursi in N Cal.


  2. #22
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    So this isn't the same as everyday manzanita right? Like the big trees?

  3. #23

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manzanita
    I wouldn't call it a big tree, Donner.

    The leaves I was drying weren't drying very quickly. Manzanita seems to be protected against drought, so I cut up the leaves to speed up the process. Should have dried leaves by this weekend.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Thaddius Bickerton's Avatar
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    I have used it at some cherokee powwows I have been invited to attend sharing a pipe with the father of the family that invited me.

    I believe it is a blend of things but knickknick was included in the mixture as told to me. No deep knowledge of it though. I will attempt to remember to ask my friend next time we meet in the woods or by the camp fire.
    Thaddius Bickerton

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  5. #25

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    Hi guys. I had to join here because I wanted to explain some things that are misconceived about Kinni-Kinnick. First and foremost these different blends of herbs and tobacco are ONLY used for special occasions. They were also ONLY used in special pipes that are blessed and holy to the People (Native Americans) who use them. These blends were also held in reserve as Holy. Many Native Americans even sing special songs as the Kinni-Kinnick is loaded into the pipes. The Kinni-Kinnick itself is held in special boxes or pouches that have also been blessed.

    Real Kinni-Kinnick is something that you have to know someone who makes it to be able to get it. It is also not cheap, about $250 a pound.

    Since it is used for religious purposes there are also many fake places out there who will sell you their junk.

    I apologize for making this my first posting, but knowledge is something taught. Wisdom is passing on that knowledge to others.

    Now I will tel you who I am. Rev. Marlin Ray Taylor... a Native American Pagan Minister

  6. #26
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Thanks for adding insight to this discussion, and welcome aboard.
    Lots of mis-information and lack of reverance by the non-Native Americans
    Survival isn't a game...it's what you do when the game goes sideways.

  7. #27
    Senior Member gryffynklm's Avatar
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    Welcome and thanks for posting Ray, like you said there is a lot of misinformation and internet $haman$ out there.
    Karl

    The quality of a person's life is in direct proportion the the effort he puts into whatever field of endeavor he chooses. Vincent T Lombardi

    A wise man profits from the wisdom of others.

  8. #28
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Let's not go too far fellas, we are right there on the religious fringe area.

    This topic is no different than discussing transubstantiation, predestination or reserection of the dead.

    If we get this started we will have folks forcing us to wipe our butts with our left hands and we might have to give up bacon!
    A person often meets his destiny while walking the path he took to avoid it.

  9. #29
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    I have smoked kinnikinnick, my personal experience was it was good, I don't smoke cigarets or anything like that but I was up in Clinton and I made a traditional hand carved peace pipe from Antler and wood and decided to smoke what the Natives smoked as well. I went and talked to a native elder I know and asked where I could find what they smoked. I once tried to inhale smoke from a cigar and could not do so at all, I have never been good around cigars or cigarettes but when I smoked kinnikinnick I had no problem inhaling it was very smooth and I had a very Interesting talk with my the Indian elder who smoked it with me. It was pretty awesome, he went the hole nine-yards where we smoked in a Tee-Pee with a small fire going in the middle. I still bring it with me when ever I head to Clinton so I can sit and smoke with the elder.

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