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Thread: Is primitive jerky (dried) safe?

  1. #41
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    The hypha is the vegetative portion of the mold. Collectively, it's the mycelium. Yes, you can see the mycelium but it also extends beyond the surface. That's the string like stuff. In many molds the mycelium is microscopic so the only thing you see are the fruiting bodies.


  2. #42
    Senior Member RandyRhoads's Avatar
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    I'm familiar with hypae and mycellium, I thought the outside covering such as penecillium on the outside of bread was the mycellium.

  3. #43
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    Let's not forget that in general, you can play russian roulette with food-borne illness all your life. countless generations of our ancestors did exactly that. they also drank untreated water, and some of them wrestled with pleistocene megafauna. they also dies a whole heck of a lot for reasons we might find ridiculous. It is probably safe to assume their priorities were a bit different, and their view of mortal danger was not identical to ours.

    my point is, the difference between what you can do in a pinch and what you should do if at all possible to preserve your health is often broad.

    Randy: hyphae are the type of cell that a fungus's mycellium (and more, in the higher fungi) is composed of. the colored portion are the mature portions of the colony, with the color caused by the spores, bourne on asci; the type of cell which produced the spores.
    Last edited by canid; 03-02-2012 at 08:26 PM.
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  4. #44
    Senior Member RandyRhoads's Avatar
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    Ok so the colored portion is really just spore covered mycellium. But I still don't understand the fruiting body. What does it look like in this type of ascomycete? A morel produces spores in the asci but still has a noticeable fruiting body.

  5. #45
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    the fruiting body is a conidiophore, which branches off of the hypha, and bears several conidia which each bear several asci. it looks a bit in structure like brocoli, but having only a few or several branches of each stage (conidiophore>conidia>asci). the ascus itself looks something like a transparent pea pod.

    http://faculty.clintoncc.suny.edu%2F...%2Ffiles%2Fbio 102%2Fbio 102 lectures%2Ffungi%2Fpenicillium_conidia_X_400.jpg is a micrograph of the structures in penicillium whith what is either a grams stain or gentian violet.
    Last edited by canid; 03-04-2012 at 03:52 AM.
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  6. #46
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    it's just hard to conceptualize without a microscope because the fruiting bodies are extremely numerous and microscopic.
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  7. #47
    Senior Member RandyRhoads's Avatar
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    Link didn't work but I think i'm starting to get the picture. The substrate is colonized by mycellium. When it reaches the surface of said substrate like an orange, it produces bunches of tiny microscopic fruiting bodies, which release the spores giving it the color.

  8. #48
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    yeah; aparently vbulletin butchers hyperlinks now. anyway, that's basically it. it's not just when it reaches the surface, though in many fungi that is a large factor (change in co2 concentrations, etc), but also tends to depend on the maturity and nutritional availability to the colony.
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    i have done it in oven at around 110 degrees bcoz i wanted it dried not baked. Turned out good and im still here. On a side note,,I live in Philippines where they air dry fish always,,I personally dont know any sick from it.

  10. #50
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Air drying has been done for centuries and is still done in a lot of places world wide. The trick is for the food to dry faster than insects can impact it or protect the food from the insects. You'll see a lot of open air drying in Africa, particularly fish, because it dries pretty fast in hot temps. Here in the Midwest, my grandfather air dried fruits but laid a screen over them to keep the flies off of the fruit until it was dried. It all works.

  11. #51
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    yeah; freshness or very controlled processing is definitely key; though i have made my share of jerky from [cringe] commercial beef. when you understand that the cow has been dead for weeks before it even hits the supermarket shelves, that is a good point to see how much safe handling and storage is critical, compared with, say, a fresh kill.
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  12. #52
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    1 shot,,1 kill. Fresh kill that is!!

  13. #53
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    certainly; if it's not a large animal you're hanging and aging.
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  14. #54

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    yes as long as it dries before the insects get a hold of it however i prefer to smoke mine over a fire becuase after i have cleaned it i cut into thin slices to smoke either way works just whatever is best for you at that time
    Last edited by fightergirl; 03-06-2012 at 04:31 PM. Reason: misspell

  15. #55

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    primitive dried meat is, in fact, safer than any other meat. In the nineteenth century, dried meat was considered safe and eaten as a staple far more regularly than fresh - interesting truth. Meats like pork, or beaver, which sometimes carry some fear of trichanosis, are rendered perfectly safe when dried. I usually do a pre smoke in a tp of the large quarters of a pig or deer, then i hang dry the strips inside over low heat. enjoy. dried meat will last for months and months, up to six months in a low humidity environment, and it is always tasty, although it does lose fat content, so the best is to separate the fat, which can also be dried in smaller pieces, to last quite a while, although rancidity must be monitored.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I have to share with you that the user name you chose is probably not a safe one. Spiders run the forum 24x7 looking for email addresses and they've no doubt captured yours. If you want to change it just PM me and we can do it. You may also get some crank emails along with all the spam since anyone on the planet can view it. Having said that, if you are happy with it then so am I.

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandyRhoads View Post
    Uh oh. I still do this lol. What are the dangers of that.....
    Do you really want to know? Well, first off, it could make you go bald, or blind. Your sex drive will diminish, and all your kids will turn stupid. You also might end up marrying an uggly chick.

    The main problem is that it contains dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO), which is a dangerous chemical found in most poisons and is the main component of acid rain.
    I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/FinallyMe78?feature=mhee

  18. #58
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Let's examine this closely.

    Bald - There is always Rogain.
    Glasses - Uh, corrective surgery. Hello?
    Sex Drive will diminish - Better living through chemistry.
    Kids will turn stupid - Yeah? So? All kids turn stupid at about 7 and finally come out of it around 35. Some a bit later.
    Marrying an ugly chick - She won't leave you and even if she does what have you lost? An ugly chick.

    Sheesh, man. Do I have to 'splain everything?

  19. #59
    Senior Member RandyRhoads's Avatar
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    Lol Rick. Makes sense.

  20. #60

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    I make tons of my own version of smoked biltong from wild game down under...It's similar to jerky except it's more practical for hot temps...I marinate the thinly sliced meat in brown vinegar and the pieces are also coated with salt and pepper prior to being marinated...then after 16-24 hrs I usually hang them to smoke for a day or two and then hang up to dry outside under a roof. The trick is to let the air and wind dry out the biltong, not the sun...It doesn't need to be smoked but it helps dry it quicker and imparts that lovely smoke flavor into the meat...Someone here mentioned hanging out in the sun in Texas...I have done that here in subtropical temps in OZ and it has ruined the biltong...the meat literally gets cooked by the sun...not what you want...you dont want to cook the meat...you have to keep it out of the sun, esp at the 45 C + temps you get out at my bush place mid-summer...it also dries more consistently that way as well when kept under a roof/shade...I have made over 20 pounds of biltong this way and there is no electricity at my bush place so it's how I keep meat for longer than the 3 days that fresh meat lasts out there.

    I love biltong, it's my no. 1 staple...along with tallow of course

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