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Thread: "I ran away to off-grid Wilderness & LIVED".

  1. #21

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    I think I may stick to the rockies of B.C. just seems to have everything, less cold, more mountainous variety, guessing more wild game food. Just seems like a more comfortable environment for the long haul.

    Not to mention I have countless hours of research invested in the local wildlife ("steak" AND "veggies") as well as the geography, and laws governing the land.

    But hey if Alaska is calling you, follow your calling. Just remember to go well prepared for any and all circumstances you may encounter, and who knows, one day if you go, I may feel like I need a change and decide to make a (roughly guessing) 750? Km journey into a different environment and bump into you.


  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    Wait a second. In this thread http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...-just-me/page2 you said: So which is it?
    It is what it is. I didn't agree with the premise that the new generation are a bunch of spoiled, misguided goons who can't look after themeslves.

    Kids growing up today are not as handy as there predecessors. I won't debate that -- because I witness it first hand. Generations before them had a different culture to live in and had a different way of living life. Those who are avid in the outdoors probably had a reason for it -- and were likely raised in an area or time where being self-sufficient was a priority: such as being farmers, ranchers, etc. Back then, it was imperative to learn those skills and trade skills were passed down from generation to generation. For example: I come from a long line of German-Russians who are workers with their hands, mostly farmers. When most of my family moved from farms into the city in the early 1900s, they kept what was necessary to survive, but also let go of alot of things they didn't need. Instance: My mother, father and grandparents still garden and grow their own food to this day -- which was something instilled and taught to me as a young boy.

    Is that knowledge something that a 17 year old kid in New York City has to have in order to make it through their journey? Probably not. City life is different -- and has its own demons and battles to prepare against. More kids and families live in urban environments today as opposed to decades ago where most of the population was located in rural areas. One's environment is a huge factor on how we adapt. It's not that the younger generations aren't self-sufficient -- they just are adapting differently. Technology is dynamic and one of the biggest change agents there is. I wouldn't classify kids getting gadgets (tech) as being spoiled. More often than not, there is a reason and place for it. It isn't just keeping up with the Jones', even though keeping up with them might be a good idea.

    Whether or not reliance on newer technology is a positive or negative for the new generation to take the becaon forward is highly debatable. In most cases, whether it be school or work, kids need to keep pace with what is being put out there. Job markets are a grind -- there is hardly a place for an analog man in a digital world. That seems to be a disconnect some have on the forum and just can't come to terms with. You may have away about going through life, but that doesn't mean it's applicable to others. To stay with the times, you have to adjust to them or you will be left behind.

    Living off-the grid for some of those reasons (and many more) probably isn't ideal or appealing to those growing up now. That isn't a generalization on my part -- but just a quick analysis of how things have changed over time.

    My two cents.

  3. #23
    Senior Member BENESSE's Avatar
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    I don't disagree with anything you said, W.
    The only observation I might add in general (from NYC, btw) is that the younger generation seems to be not quite as adaptable to 180 change of direction or doing more with less.

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    I can vouch for that B. A friend of mine has a "cabin" in NH. Its more like a little ranch home. It has electric, a kitchen w/ stove and fridge. It has beds and couches. It has a shower with heated water. Heat is provided by a wood burning stove. Thanks to my dad, a coworker, and myself, it has a new roof and we added a boat toilet (self contained toilet) into the shower room to make it a full bathroom. Its about 45 minutes from Conway, NH (typical small tourist town).

    Now, I've invited numerous friends to go with me this spring to hang out. The only condition I put on them is that we will only use the outhouse as a toilet (I don't see the point of dealing with cleaning out the boat toilet when there is perfectly good outhouse). Almost all of my friends have refused to go based on the fact there is an outhouse. There is also no tv in the place and no cell service unless you go out to the road. They can't adapt to a simpler way of living for a few days to see some of the most incredible landscapes. They would rather pay for modern conveniences than stay for free.

    Thankfully my closest friends want to go.

    (I am not the younger generation either, I'm 30, so I grew up without all these modern techs)

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    LOL, You are right, a hooter separates the men from the real men.....and women, quick.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    LOL, You are right, a hooter separates the men from the real men.....and women, quick.
    Well Duh!

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    JP - It's not that they can't adapt for a few days. It's just that they don't want to. There's a difference. If they had no choice they would probably adapt just fine. There are some things my friends enjoy that I haven't the slightest interest in. They may well think I can't adapt when I just choose not to enjoy something their way.

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    SD - A question for you. Would it be fair to say that when you first went to Alaska it wasn't to live in the wilds as some express they want to do. Rather you went there in a more conventional way by finding a job and earning a living. I don't mean to imply that it was an easy life or comparable to life in the lower 48. It's just your title gives the impression you went from Pa to the wilderness when off grid was really a process of earning your stripes over many years?

    You know I have much respect for your skills and those of our other AK members. You all have done something I wouldn't even attempt. I just don't want some young whipper snapper to think they can trek out into Turnagain Pass or squat on the shores of Eclutna Lake and live off willows and seeds for the winter.

  9. #29
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    I'm with Rick. It's too darn cold up there for a country boy like me. It's 25 degrees here again this morning and I'm wrapped up like a burrito INSIDE the house.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    SD - A question for you. Would it be fair to say that when you first went to Alaska it wasn't to live in the wilds as some express they want to do.
    I came to Alaska to hunt big bears. America had a military draft, that was a lottery draft system at that time. It was clear that I was to be drafted in mid summer or early fall, and I wanted to hunt Alaska before getting drafted.

    The government paid for all of my education & apprenticeship. It appears that the program I was in (Unknown to me) was funded by the Dept. of Defense.

  11. #31
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    Your story gives me hope! I'm 22 and prepping to go out and live a more natural and free life.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheWildCallsToME View Post
    Your story gives me hope! I'm 22 and prepping to go out and live a more natural and free life.

    I hate paperwork...
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    Instead of TP?

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    Well, that or your finger. Whichever you've been using.

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    Well, he did say he hated paperwork.
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    If you can't find Mullen leaves...

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    Never do that in a talus field or on a beach. Don't ask how I know just take my word for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Warheit View Post
    It is what it is. I didn't agree with the premise that the new generation are a bunch of spoiled, misguided goons who can't look after themeslves.

    Kids growing up today are not as handy as there predecessors. I won't debate that -- because I witness it first hand. Generations before them had a different culture to live in and had a different way of living life. Those who are avid in the outdoors probably had a reason for it -- and were likely raised in an area or time where being self-sufficient was a priority: such as being farmers, ranchers, etc. Back then, it was imperative to learn those skills and trade skills were passed down from generation to generation. For example: I come from a long line of German-Russians who are workers with their hands, mostly farmers. When most of my family moved from farms into the city in the early 1900s, they kept what was necessary to survive, but also let go of alot of things they didn't need. Instance: My mother, father and grandparents still garden and grow their own food to this day -- which was something instilled and taught to me as a young boy.

    Is that knowledge something that a 17 year old kid in New York City has to have in order to make it through their journey? Probably not. City life is different -- and has its own demons and battles to prepare against. More kids and families live in urban environments today as opposed to decades ago where most of the population was located in rural areas. One's environment is a huge factor on how we adapt. It's not that the younger generations aren't self-sufficient -- they just are adapting differently. Technology is dynamic and one of the biggest change agents there is. I wouldn't classify kids getting gadgets (tech) as being spoiled. More often than not, there is a reason and place for it. It isn't just keeping up with the Jones', even though keeping up with them might be a good idea.

    Whether or not reliance on newer technology is a positive or negative for the new generation to take the becaon forward is highly debatable. In most cases, whether it be school or work, kids need to keep pace with what is being put out there. Job markets are a grind -- there is hardly a place for an analog man in a digital world. That seems to be a disconnect some have on the forum and just can't come to terms with. You may have away about going through life, but that doesn't mean it's applicable to others. To stay with the times, you have to adjust to them or you will be left behind.

    Living off-the grid for some of those reasons (and many more) probably isn't ideal or appealing to those growing up now. That isn't a generalization on my part -- but just a quick analysis of how things have changed over time.

    My two cents.
    I would say not all of the my generation has lost the skills of the past generations. I am 18 going on 19, when I was about 12 I was given the option of a laptop or a canoe for Christmas and chose the canoe. My dad has taught me many things, I love to hunt and fish, frog gig, jug, run a trot-line, trap. About 4 or 5 years ago we had a bad wind storm that laid a lot of corn down and we gleaned enough corn to feed out to steers. Most of the meat we eat comes from cows we've fed out or the deer we've taken. We used to have a huge garden where we grew cucumbers, beans, sweet corn, zucchinis, tomatoes peppers, etc. the vegetables were canned and the left over sweet corn was blanched and frozen. I can work on a truck and fix most any problem if it can be fixed with the tools at my disposal. I would rather help put up hay, unload seed off a semi, clean out horse stalls, or build fence, than sit around complaining how bored I am.

    I'm not disagreeing with you, I have many friends who fit your description to a tee. I'm just saying that there are some people out there that are still handy in the ways of the past.
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  19. #39
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    You lost me on that cleaning out stalls thing. Being bored is not that bad.

  20. #40
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    One day I will return to AK.

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