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Thread: "I ran away to off-grid Wilderness & LIVED".

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky93 View Post
    I would say not all of the my generation has lost the skills of the past generations. I am 18 going on 19, when I was about 12 I was given the option of a laptop or a canoe for Christmas and chose the canoe. My dad has taught me many things, I love to hunt and fish, frog gig, jug, run a trot-line, trap. About 4 or 5 years ago we had a bad wind storm that laid a lot of corn down and we gleaned enough corn to feed out to steers. Most of the meat we eat comes from cows we've fed out or the deer we've taken. We used to have a huge garden where we grew cucumbers, beans, sweet corn, zucchinis, tomatoes peppers, etc. the vegetables were canned and the left over sweet corn was blanched and frozen. I can work on a truck and fix most any problem if it can be fixed with the tools at my disposal. I would rather help put up hay, unload seed off a semi, clean out horse stalls, or build fence, than sit around complaining how bored I am.

    I'm not disagreeing with you, I have many friends who fit your description to a tee. I'm just saying that there are some people out there that are still handy in the ways of the past.
    First and foremost -- thanks for the post! Well-reasoned and level -- 'ppreciate that!

    Yes, they are out there, but for our generation people like you and I are exceptions, not the rule. FWIW: You and I are pretty much on the same wave-length. Did you happen to grow up in a smaller town or rural area? By your subsistence patterns and way of life, I'd guess that more than a city dweller. My grandparents on both sides owned farms (one also raised horses) and sold them and moved into a small town back in the 1960s. I'm still a pretty handy person (compared to most in our age range, I'll be 25 in April) -- but I wonder what my life would had been liked had my family not abandoned their old way of life. (On my dad's side, they didn't have a choice, my grandfather died when my dad was 10 and there wasn't someone old enough in their family or able to take care of all the things they had -- so making a change was the most rational choice.)

    More than anything, I'm technologically skilled and inclined. I got my first computer when I was 3 (Tandy 386) and have been an avid user ever since. I obtained my Bachelors of Science in two different fields (Political Science and Anthropology), but my technological skills are undoubtedly what have put me ahead of others in the job market. My first job off the rip was being a Legal Analyst and Specialist. My second job (after I moved to Colorado) deals with publication and database development, and I also do quite a bit of sales and marketing.

    Neither (besides in-depth knowledge of law and the legal system through school) of those positions related to what I did through University, but required extensive knowledge in computers, programming, etc. that I obtained off the side because of my avid interest in such matters. My father was a smart guy and knew that the very fabric we're speaking over would have a profound impact the world over. He's still shocked that I didn't end up majoring in Computer Science or MIS. I just wasn't interested in taking all the math required to obtain the degree.

    So long story short, I guess I'm thankful on my upbringing. I have a mix of the old ways and the new ways and I feel pretty well-equipped moving forward. Overall, I think the discourse in this thread has been pretty negative to us younglings, but most every older generation puts their nose down on those who replace them, but it's understandable. Kids ten to fifteen years younger than me are learning information in new ways and receiving it faster than ever before. I'm going to have to keep my will strong and aspirations up, or I'll end up like the middle-aged analogs who are losing to the youth digitals these days.

    Take care homie!
    Last edited by Warheit; 02-18-2012 at 10:46 PM.


  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warheit
    Overall, I think the discourse in this thread has been pretty negative to us younglings, but most every older generation puts their nose down on those who replace them
    It's that way with every generation. You'll be the same way as will your generation.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Sparky93's Avatar
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    Warheit, I grew up in a rural area. Town is about a 8 minute drive, but it's not much of a town, has a few places to eat, grocery store pharmacy, ahhh... the bustling metropolis of Petersburg lol. My dad runs a feed store that has been in our family since 1914, I think he is the fourth generation. My dad raises horses and team ropes, he used to shoe horses as a side job and the hospital bills from when I was born were paid for by shoeing horses.

    Computers and I have a love hate relationship lol. I love to CAD and have dabbled in C programming before, but when it comes to figuring out problems with a computer or getting them to work sometimes they are a pain in my keester. I am currently majoring in mechanical engineering technology at Purdue University and am considering minoring in CGT.
    "Freedom had been hunted round the globe; reason was considered as rebellion; and the slavery of fear had made men afraid to think. But such is the irresistible nature of truth, that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing."
    Thomas Paine

    Minimalist Camping: Enjoy nature, don't be tortured by it. Take as little as you need to be safe and comfortable.

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