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Thread: Oil Cloth recipe

  1. #41
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I can't help you. Hopefully KyRat or someone will be along and can give you some advice. I will say don't fold it up. Leave it hanging. Linseed oil will spontaneously ignite if the material is folded over on itself and crumpled up. It will generate enough heat to ignite.
    Yes it will....neighbors garage went up after he finished the wood work in prep for selling his house.......new owner got a new garage.
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  2. #42
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    I'd wonder about dyeing oilcloth AFTER waterproofing. If you could, it wouldn't really be waterproofing, eh?

    You can get a fiberglas panel for a stove pipe from Panther Primitives (pantherprimitives.com) that can be sewn into a wall of your tent. The fiberglas does not burn, and diffuses the heat of the stovepipe. It's not recommended to put the smoke pipe through the roof, though some have done that (potential rain leak). The PP stove panels come with a waterproof flap that can be tied shut when the stovepipe is not installed.
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  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by M.Demetrius View Post
    I'd wonder about dyeing oilcloth AFTER waterproofing. If you could, it wouldn't really be waterproofing, eh?

    You can get a fiberglas panel for a stove pipe from Panther Primitives (pantherprimitives.com) that can be sewn into a wall of your tent. The fiberglas does not burn, and diffuses the heat of the stovepipe. It's not recommended to put the smoke pipe through the roof, though some have done that (potential rain leak). The PP stove panels come with a waterproof flap that can be tied shut when the stovepipe is not installed.
    I have a smaller lodge (wall tent) now, but my big one had the smoke hole w/insert and flap installed when made. worked fine.
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  4. #44
    Member M.Demetrius's Avatar
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    You can order just the rain flap and smoke hole insert. Any canvas tent could be retrofitted. They will not sell one installed for any tent that isn't flame retardant. (And flame retardant is only sensible, even though it costs more. I saw a ACW wedge tent literally burn to the ground in two minutes flat. Since then, only FR for me.)

    I suppose, but am not recommending, that the insert could be installed in a tent that was not flame retardant. Fire plus canvas with air on both sides is not a great combo, though, for the longevity of the tent and its inhabitants.
    Saepe veritas est dura.
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  5. #45

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    Question about this method. I have a canvas pack that I would like to do, but it has zippers on it and buckles. Will this gum up the zippers? I was thinking about soaking the pack in the solution to saturate it and then hang to dry. Will the interior dry fairly quick or will it stay wet for a long time? I mentioned this to my wife, and she said her grandpa used to do the same treatment to his old canvas tent.

  6. #46

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    Yes linseed oil spontaneously combusts. I know, I've done it. I threw some rags with the oil on them in a trailer to take to the dump. Later the next day my daughter said when she got home from school the trailer was on fire and she had to use the garden hose to put it out.

    I do have a question about washing the items that have been treated. (I was thinking bout waterproofing jeans.)
    Can canvas or denim be laundered without ruining the waterproofing?

  7. #47

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    I was thinking bout waterproofing jeans.
    Can canvas or denim be laundered without ruining the waterproofing?

  8. #48
    Senior Member Sparky93's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gohammergo View Post
    Question about this method. I have a canvas pack that I would like to do, but it has zippers on it and buckles. Will this gum up the zippers? I was thinking about soaking the pack in the solution to saturate it and then hang to dry. Will the interior dry fairly quick or will it stay wet for a long time? I mentioned this to my wife, and she said her grandpa used to do the same treatment to his old canvas tent.
    For waterproofing a canvas pack you may want to look into waxing it, I have a canvas possibles bag I've been wanting to wax. If you search "how to wax canvas" on YouTube there are a few good videos.

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  9. #49
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    I know of another method of oilskinning; it was effective, but really stiff.
    Anyone have any luck with the beeswax/linseed oil method of oil skinning, and it coming out decently pliable?

  10. #50

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    hello all!
    this is my first post
    I tried the 50/50 recipe on a zelbahn, (canvas triangle poncho, shelter quarter) I have had it hanging for about two days now and it is still....well... oily. Its not gummy, but how long does it take for the oiliness to disperse....should I do something else?
    any suggestions would be appreciated thanks

  11. #51
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Leave it hanging for two or three weeks. It is usable at this point but will not be completely cured for at least two weeks. It is also best to hang it in the shade for the slow cure. Do not fold it up and try to store it for at least two weeks.

    It will still feel slick even when cured, but it will not spontaneously combust after curing.

    Things took longer "back in the day".
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  12. #52

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    thanks....I was abt 24 hours from washing it with dish soap to get rid of the excess oil

  13. #53
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    Hello the camp, Worked as wrangler for ADK Packtrain Hunting Service in Cold River, 1966, we used this recipe on all canvas when camp was setup used by self many times since. Trader Tut

  14. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    Do not use the cheap 8oz canvas tarps, their weave is too open and they never close up. The best way to prep it is wash it in hot water and dry it on hot setting.
    If not an 8oz, is 10oz preferred or would it need to be 12oz?

  15. #55
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    Yes, 12 oz is preferred.

    You can also use other close weave fabrics like heavy broadcloth or denim. I have even treated cotton bed sheets successfully. Just try to choose fabric that shows very little light through the weave and shrink it before treating it if possible.

    Hot water wash, hot rinse and a hot dryer.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  16. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    Yes, 12 oz is preferred.

    You can also use other close weave fabrics like heavy broadcloth or denim. I have even treated cotton bed sheets successfully. Just try to choose fabric that shows very little light through the weave and shrink it before treating it if possible.

    Hot water wash, hot rinse and a hot dryer.

    As for applying the boiled linseed + mineral spirits, does the material need to be hung to apply the solution or can it be lying on the ground. I know from reading, it needs to be hung to ensure proper drying.
    Last edited by Acska83; 04-16-2016 at 09:03 AM.

  17. #57
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    You will lose a lot of your solution if you spread the fabric on the ground. you will also have a big cleanup mess.

    I usually hung the fabric from a line and started painting the solution on with a brush, starting at the top.

    As the top level saturates gravity pulls the solution down and by the time you get to the bottom it is already wet and you find yourself doing touchups.

    Another method I have used and prefer is using a pump up garden sprayer from the garden center. You put the solution in the tank, pump it up and spray the fabric like you were spraying for bugs. It makes reaching the top of big pieces of fabric easier too. The wand allows you to spray areas 10-15 feet up in the air, and some of the tarps I have done were big.

    I would usually spray, wait overnight and spray again to insure coverage, then let it cure for a couple of weeks.

    Do all this outside because it is going to drip and make a mess. It will also kill the grass where it drips.

    You also do not want the smell indoors.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 04-16-2016 at 04:55 PM.
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  18. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post
    You will lose a lot of your solution if you spread the fabric on the ground. you will also have a big cleanup mess.

    I usually hung the fabric from a line and started painting the solution on with a brush, starting at the top.

    As the top level saturates gravity pulls the solution down and by the time you get to the bottom it is already wet and you find yourself doing touchups.

    Another method I have used and prefer is using a pump up garden sprayer from the garden center. You put the solution in the tank, pump it up and spray the fabric like you were spraying for bugs. It makes reaching the top of big pieces of fabric easier too. The wand allows you to spray areas 10-15 feet up in the air, and some of the tarps I have done were big.

    I would usually spray, wait overnight and spray again to insure coverage, then let it cure for a couple of weeks.

    Do all this outside because it is going to drip and make a mess. It will also kill the grass where it drips.

    You also do not want the smell indoors.
    Thanks for the help!

  19. #59

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    Great info. glad this thread was renewed again.

  20. #60

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    If you can still get it, "Japan drier" works quicker and better for boiled linseed oil than mineral spirits.
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