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Thread: Almost done, but I may need to re-think a few things.

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    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    Default Almost done, but I may need to re-think a few things.

    Okay guys, I just about have three medical kits put together. I have a home kit that is rather large and contains things in good quantity. I have then made two more kits that contain the same items but of lesser quantities for each vehicle. Even then, it seems like there maybe too much in the car kits. I mean, do I need alcohol wipes, rubbing alocohol, and hydrogen peroxide? Do I need Aspirin, Tylonol, and ibprofin?

    I want to keep quite a bit at home for buggin in purposes. If I need to bug out, I will grab it and take it with me anyway. My main purpose of a car kit is to care for a person until home can be reached in minor situations or until professional medical help can be obtained for major situations. A car kit also gives access to first aid in a bug out situation where home can't be reached before hand.

    So should I keep all of that, or shrink it down a bit for other items?


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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Apririn, Ibuprofen and Tylenol (acetominiphen) are different medications designed to do different things. You need to understand what each does and how it does it in order to evaluate its place in your kit.

    Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory (NSAID) but works much differently than other NSAIDs. While it is effective in pain relief the best application for it today is probably as a preventative for heart attacks and strokes. it works well at controlling fever and pain in adults but can cause Reye's Syndrome in children. If you have gout or kidney disease, don't use it because it restricts the kidney's ability to excrete uric acid. It can also increase the risk of intestinal bleeding.

    Ibuprofen, another NSAID, works really well to reduce pain and inflamation as well as fever. It works very well on menstrual cramps and strained muscles. That's why it's used in products like Midol. It can be a problem for folks taking other NSAIDS, have ulcers, drink, smoke or have high blood pressure. Ibuprofen can increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes under certain conditions.

    Acetominiphen will also reduce pain and fever but has no impact on swelling. If you drink then this one isn't a good choice for you because it can cause liver damage.

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    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    I see what you mean, Rick. In the car, the meds would be for fever and pain, just until home or medical help can be reached. So just tylenol and ibprofin should be fine, Right? For the same reason, alcohol wipes and hydrogen peroxide should be just fine, right? Also, is meds that help with cold/flu symptoms needed in a car kit in my scenario? I want to be sufficiently prepared, but I'm trying to prevent having a large backpack to hold it all in.

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    If they are kept in the vehicles and not interfering with anything else that you need to store or use, then I would opt for having too much rather than too little.
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    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    That is a good point as well, Crash. I think that is what I will do, too. Perhaps my issue isn't how much I have, but how I have it organized. I may have to do some better research on assembly.

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    Senior Member Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Acetaminophen in large quantity has killed more people with liver damage than alcohol!

    Grain alcohol should be in that kit.... air tight seal.
    "Never work against mother nature"--Caesar Milan.

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    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Old Owl View Post
    Grain alcohol should be in that kit.... air tight seal.
    Moonshine?

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Apririn, Ibuprofen and Tylenol (acetominiphen) are different medications designed to do different things. You need to understand what each does and how it does it in order to evaluate its place in your kit.

    Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory (NSAID) but works much differently than other NSAIDs. While it is effective in pain relief the best application for it today is probably as a preventative for heart attacks and strokes. it works well at controlling fever and pain in adults but can cause Reye's Syndrome in children. If you have gout or kidney disease, don't use it because it restricts the kidney's ability to excrete uric acid. It can also increase the risk of intestinal bleeding.

    Ibuprofen, another NSAID, works really well to reduce pain and inflamation as well as fever. It works very well on menstrual cramps and strained muscles. That's why it's used in products like Midol. It can be a problem for folks taking other NSAIDS, have ulcers, drink, smoke or have high blood pressure. Ibuprofen can increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes under certain conditions.

    Acetominiphen will also reduce pain and fever but has no impact on swelling. If you drink then this one isn't a good choice for you because it can cause liver damage.
    I disagree. I'd rather save the room for things that are going to save my life. If you can't deal with the pain, avoid it. I welcome pain as it teaches me how to avoid it in the future. It acts as a sort of reminder, if you will. I tend to go more towards things which will prevent infection, since the infection is going to kill you.

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    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tenche View Post
    I disagree. I'd rather save the room for things that are going to save my life. If you can't deal with the pain, avoid it. I welcome pain as it teaches me how to avoid it in the future. It acts as a sort of reminder, if you will. I tend to go more towards things which will prevent infection, since the infection is going to kill you.
    Sounds as thought you have never been seriously injured and days away from help. To somebody having a heart attack - aspirin could be a life saver. To somebody with a debilitating pain, the OTC pain relievers might take off enough of the "edge" to allow them to function in such a way as to survive. A heart attack, bleeding to death, debilitating pain can all have the same result as death caused by infection - death.
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    Senior Member natertot's Avatar
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    I agree, crash.broke both wrists, a rib and punctured my leg. I never took any prescriptions, just OTC, and it was worth having.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I'm not sure what you disagreed with. I said he should understand what each does in order to evaluate it's place in a kit. After knowing what each does and how it works you may choose not to have it OR you may choose to carry all three. I happen to carry all three as well as Vicodin.

    Severe traumatic injury, such as a broken leg, simply can not be ignored. I don't care how macho you or how high of a threshold you have with pain you simply can not "avoid" it. Pain is a very physical occurrence and is really quite complicated. The reason most people can endure high levels of pain is because their brain releases endorphins (endogeneous morphine) to assist in controlling pain.

    The whole purpose of controlling pain in a wilderness setting is to allow you to do whatever needs done in some level of comfort until help arrives. That, by the way, is the same thing antibiotics do. They help control potential infection until help arrives.

    What will you do if you and a loved one are in the wilderness, they break a bone, and you find out they have a low threshold for pain? Would ibuprofen or some stronger pain killer be valuable then?

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    Chewable baby aspirin is worth having for any adult over 40 with rapid onset chest pain that is not due to something obviously not cardiac. Don't need more than one per incident, so only a few would be worth carrying. Ibuprofen can reduce the pain and swelling of anything from twisted ankle/knee to toothache to broken limb, so useful to have on hand anytime you might be more than hours from medical help. Aspirin and Ibuprofen will decrease clotting ability (therefore increase bleeding), so keep that in mind. Acetaminophen will reduce pain without worsening previous stomach problems or increasing bleeding. Ice packs are also very helpful in reducing pain and swelling, but bulky to carry. If you do have instant ice packs, remember that the chemicals can leak and packs go bad over the years. When I travel by air or car, I make sure I have a few stronger pills (Vicodin or Norco), (prescribed to me or wife, in orig. labeled pharmacy bottles) in case of more severe pain and when it's not imperative to keep a completely clear head. Being able to avoid the ER and wait for an Urgent Care to open can save thousands of dollars.

  13. #13
    The newbie! Willie's Avatar
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    How often should pills be changed out for new/fresh ones? It they are life in the heat/cold in my car, about how long are they good for?

    Willie
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    It depends on the med and the temps. Some can't be frozen & some can't be exposed to high heat. You need to research each one if you plan to leave it in the car. You also run the risk of theft if stored in your car. My script meds are always brought inside for both reasons. I do leave tylenol in the car & truck.

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    Senior Member SARKY's Avatar
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    Do you have a dedicated trauma kit? You should!
    I know what hunts you.

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