Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: how to make a simple rabbit snare

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    5

    Default how to make a simple rabbit snare

    i want to know how to make one, i have tried ( and failed) before, and think i have set it out wrong, could someone please just go through some basic steps


  2. #2

    Default

    I make mine roughly the diameter of my fist. I set the bottom of the snare roughly three fingers from the ground. A duck stick is angled across the top of the snare at a 45 degree angle, then a couple sticks are pushed into the ground along the sides of the snare. Sometimes sticks aren't needed because there is already a natural bottleneck. I set my snares as blind sets along trails.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Wise Old Owl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Paoli, PA
    Posts
    393

    Default

    Randyt - good description but needs a photo - just saying.


    There was an Old Man with a owl,
    Who continued to bother and howl;
    He sat on a rail, And imbibed bitter ale,
    Which refreshed that Old Man and his owl.
    .WOO

  4. #4
    Member TheWaywardOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    The Sand Hill Plains
    Posts
    62

    Default

    I like using rolling snares for rabbits. They are more time consuming than a "drag noose" or something of that style, but I've had better luck with them personally. Trails are relatively easy to find in thick brush or high grass. I use a green sapling for the spring, or if in an open field I'll cut the sapling and drive it into the ground like a bank pole. I've experimented with hanging a rock or log over a stationary branch as a drop weight as opposed to using a spring, and I don't think it's as effective, but will work in a pinch. I hang the snare noose about like Randy described, approximately fist sized (unless there are jack rabbits, then I set them higher with a slightly larger noose), an inch or two above the ground. I try to avoid having to pound stakes into the ground for a funnel if possible, but sometimes it's unavoidable. The trigger set up I use it usually a stick with a notch cut into it driven into the ground at an angle, and a Y-stick with one side cut short and sharpened in a flat square fir into the notch so that pressure from either side will spring it. I realize that's not the best description but I don't have any pictures on hand. There are many different ways to set a trigger that work. I'll try to gets some photos net time I'm out. With a little practice you should be able to find one that works well for you.
    “One swallow does not make a summer, but one skein of geese, cleaving the murk of a March thaw, is the spring.” ― Aldo Leopold

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Old Owl View Post
    Randyt - good description but needs a photo - just saying.
    Tomorrow I'll set one and take a picture.

  6. #6
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    49,128

    Default

    Here's a tutorial I made some time back on how to make a snare.

    http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...ght=make+snare

    But there is a lot more to snaring than just the configuration of the wire. So read through this as well:

    http://www.wilderness-survival.net/food-2.php

  7. #7
    Senior Member SARKY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    2,634

    Default

    There are a lot of different snares you can use. From a drag snare to an anchored or staked snare to a twitch up.
    Check out
    www.esseknives.com
    once you get on the site the bar across the top has a selection for survival tips. click on it then scroll down to snares. They have several good diagrams of snares.
    Hope this helps.
    I know what hunts you.

  8. #8

    Default

    here's a photo of my snare making method. The wire is wrapped around a twig two times.
    Guests can not see images in the messages. Please register in the forum.

    then the twig is turned like a propeller to twist the wire together. Sorry about the fuzzy photo.
    Guests can not see images in the messages. Please register in the forum.

    the twig is snapped at the double wrap and this is what we have. I like to leave a tail on it. The tail tangles in the fur and helps keep the snare from opening up.
    Guests can not see images in the messages. Please register in the forum.


    here is a mock snare set up. this is for a blind set on a trail. This is my preferred method for all snares. A log crossing is a favourite of mine, mainly for coyotes, bobcats and such. For those I prefer thompson snares. I may even look into thompson small games snares and go that route rather than wire.
    Guests can not see images in the messages. Please register in the forum.

  9. #9

    Default

    somebody asked about what tools I use to make my snares. I use a gerber multi-tool. although I have cut snare wire by giving it a whack with a rock at the point I wanted to cut the wire. Another rock is needed as a backer.

  10. #10
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    49,128

    Default

    Randy, if you use my method in the link above you will accomplish the same thing and you won't have to mess with the twig. It's just a figure 8 rolled over to form the double loop. Unless you want to use the twig, of course. Sometimes we do things just cause that's what we're comfortable doing.

  11. #11

    Default

    I like the twig method, it seems quicker and I can get a good twist especially with the stiff s.s. wire.

    As with all things though, different strokes for different folks.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Sparky93's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    1,428

    Default

    Thanks for the post randyt, I missed it the first time around.
    "Freedom had been hunted round the globe; reason was considered as rebellion; and the slavery of fear had made men afraid to think. But such is the irresistible nature of truth, that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing."
    Thomas Paine

    Minimalist Camping: Enjoy nature, don't be tortured by it. Take as little as you need to be safe and comfortable.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •