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Thread: Jungle first-aid

  1. #1

    Default Jungle first-aid

    Hello,

    I'm looking for information reguarding my jungle first-aid kit. Besides the obvious Malarone and penicillin, what are some suggested items to include?

    Thanks

    -MN
    "I am reminded of the man who, alone in a vast desert with no hat, no water, and a broken leg pulled himself up on one bruised and battered elbow and smiled at a bunch of dry grass, saying, ‘You know, if this keeps up I just might get discouraged!"
    - Larry Dean Olsen, quoted from Outdoor Survival Skills, 1966

    My Website: www.HitchTheWorld.com


  2. #2
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I'm going to suggest you contact one of our members, Pict. He has lived in Brazil for several years. He hasn't been on in a few months but you can contact him through his video channel. Go to:

    http://www.youtube.com/user/Colhane

    Good luck.

  3. #3
    Junior Member bushrat82's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by themodernnomad View Post
    Hello,

    I'm looking for information reguarding my jungle first-aid kit. Besides the obvious Malarone and penicillin, what are some suggested items to include?

    Thanks

    -MN
    Iodine, betadine, some alcohol prep pads, hydrogen peroxide, hydrocortisone cream, motrin or aleve, halls cough drops too.
    www.threesixtyosi.com

  4. #4
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    MN- I actually spent a summer traveling through South America and camping and I found this book to be a very helpful reference. It's a really great medical guide for camping and surviving in the outdoors. I would definitely pack this in your jungle first- aid kit. Here's the link to - Medicine for the Outdoors

    Best of luck!
    Last edited by Ed McGill; 05-08-2012 at 09:28 AM. Reason: realized the link didn't hyperlink

  5. #5
    Off Grid! Darkevs's Avatar
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    GSE!

    Over the years I have dabbled in alternative medicine, one of the handiest, all purpose remedies I keep on hand is grapefruit seed extract, in drops and pill form.

    Google it and see why I recommend it for pets, people, gardens, livestock, wildlife, food preservative, non-toxic cleaner, etc.!

    http://www.nutriteam.com/pets.htm

    http://www.pureliquidgold.com/

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    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
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    Be sure and take something for foot rot! It happens to everybody that hikes the amazon because of the wet humid envoronment, and when your feet start to rot, you are not going to be hiking! Fluocinonide is one the best ointments, but I am sure there are lots good products for that. Also several pairs of dry socks! I have heard talc and Noxema skin cream helps as well!

  7. #7
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I don't think I'd recommend a corticosteroid for immersion foot. In addition, Fluocinonide is water washable so a wet environment would prevent its efficacy and simply wash it away. Anti-fungals and/or antibiotics may be prescribed as necessary if there are secondary complications. The best method has been known since WWI. 12 hours of drying for every 48 hours of water exposure. That's really all that's needed to keep feet healthy. Dry boots and socks are a must of course. Ointments have shown no positive affects either. It's been a problem in both world wars, Korea and Viet Nam and takes anywhere from 3 days to two weeks to recover depending on severity. Immersion foot is not something to ignore. Dem feet gotta breath.

  8. #8
    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    I don't think I'd recommend a corticosteroid for immersion foot. In addition, Fluocinonide is water washable so a wet environment would prevent its efficacy and simply wash it away. Anti-fungals and/or antibiotics may be prescribed as necessary if there are secondary complications. The best method has been known since WWI. 12 hours of drying for every 48 hours of water exposure. That's really all that's needed to keep feet healthy. Dry boots and socks are a must of course. Ointments have shown no positive affects either. It's been a problem in both world wars, Korea and Viet Nam and takes anywhere from 3 days to two weeks to recover depending on severity. Immersion foot is not something to ignore. Dem feet gotta breath.
    Well I'm thinking you would put it on after you stop for the day and are drying out your feet, but there are recomendations for it, so I would think it must do some good. There are some natives that use a termite nest and hold their feet in the smoke, I dont know if it is the fire drying their feet out, or the termite nest that is helping them, but they swear by it!

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