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Thread: suggestions for a field guide for mushrooms on the east coast

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    dirt ball MangyWhiteBushman's Avatar
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    Default suggestions for a field guide for mushrooms on the east coast

    As i've been walking up the AT I've identified a lot of wild edibles via my wild edibles field guide. I've recently taken a couple hundred photo's of mushrooms, but can only identify, maybe three. I have "Mushrooms Demystified", but need something smaller. Before I go down to the book store I thought I'd throw the question out here. I don't get back on trail for another week so I still have time to order something if need be. Thanks for all suggestions.
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I know weight is a consideration on the trail and the best book I have probably weighs about 1.5 pounds although it's pocket sized. It's Simon and Schusters Guide to Mushrooms. I have an older version but this is the book.

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    dirt ball MangyWhiteBushman's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip. Do you use the book and have you found it helpfull? Amazons reviews are a bit shifty.

    http://www.amazon.com/Simon-Schuster...owViewpoints=1
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    You might want to do a little local investigation first with a knowledgeable mushroom expert. Wild mushrooms vary so much during their stages of growth that unless you are very very sure, you shouldn't eat them.

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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I am the world's worst at mushrooms. I know morels and that's all I pick. The book goes with me from time to time just to help identify some possible fungi. But there are so many things that you need to do to identify a mushroom you don't know, like spore printing, that makes it too dangerous a sport for me.

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    Senior Member Sparky93's Avatar
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    Theirs a guy that brings my dad some feaky lookin mushrooms (I call him the mushroom man, clever I know), he'll tell him the scientific name and how you tell this is this kind of mushroom and how theres another mushroom that looks just like it but it's deadly poison. Dad will tell him thanks and after he walks out the door he'll nock it into the trash can. I'm with rick, morels are the route for me.
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    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
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    Cool Huh?

    There's other edible mushrooms than Morels? When did this happen?
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    The Simon and Schuster book is a good one to have, but for a field guide the National Audubon Society's field guide to north American Mushrooms can't be beat. It's especially useful to someone who is new to shrooms as well as the seasoned forager.

    I have well over 20 books on mushrooms, as well as probably 30 or so internet links for mushroom related stuff. I have also e-mailed toxicologists and mycologisits regarding the edibility of certain species and genera of mushrooms. I use all the resources combined to make 100% positive ID, and only eat a mushroom once I'm completely familiar with it.

    I would also recommend Orson K. Miller jr.s field guide, I believe it's called North American Mushrooms or something similar as well. It's issued by Falcon Press and goes into more detail on toxicity and genera info regarding edibility than most guides..

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    dirt ball MangyWhiteBushman's Avatar
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    I got itchy feet and went down to the book store. Although I did like the Falcon Press book it was too big and heavy for my AT travel. I was lucky enough to find the Audubon book and got that one, looks darn good. I'm trying to cram down as much of the Mushrooms Demystified before I hit the trail again.
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    Best book on 'shrooms that you can get is the National Audubon societies book on mushrooms. However, books are only a fraction of the knowledge that you need to learn. Best bet is to study the "foolproof four" Oysters, Morels, Boletes and Chanterelles. Also, take a look at this link, he is a mycologist and I frequent his site regularly for my ever ending search on knowledge.

    http://www.mushroomexpert.com/

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    "There are old mushroom hunters, There are Bold mushroom hunters...never are there old AND bold mushroom hunters"....when in doubt, throw it out...no second chances with a limited few shrooms..

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    Mushrooms demystified is an awesome book and David arora has a great style of writing.

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    Well, I thought better to revive an old thread than start a new one. I'm sure the original poster is far beyond the need for my response, but this is what I have found with books on wild mushrooms after having used several. The more info from the most sources the better. This way you can cross-reference and find out who is full of it etc. Though there is always something that can be learned even from the least educated. Even me Here are my two favorites: (both have been mentioned)

    1. Simon and scheuster

    This book is, I think, the least usefull as a field guide and in fact all but about six pages I no longer reference. But those pages make this book well worth the purchase. They are the green pages that make up the key. I have yet to find a key that is as user friendly. Study that key, and you will learn more mushrooms than you could ever hope to learn. And if space is an issue then tear them out and throw away the rest. I think the key was developed by a third party.

    National Audubon

    I like this one because it covers all the "Look alikes." (I know, no such thing, only "look similars.") This way when you have found the mushroom you think you have (Using the afore mentioned key) you can compare characteristics with similar looking mushrooms. The only down side of it is that there are many mushrooms not contained in the book. This is why it is helpful to have many.

    My 2 cents FWIW

    mark

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    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwc1969 View Post
    The Simon and Schuster book is a good one to have, but for a field guide the National Audubon Society's field guide to north American Mushrooms can't be beat. It's especially useful to someone who is new to shrooms as well as the seasoned forager.

    I have well over 20 books on mushrooms, as well as probably 30 or so internet links for mushroom related stuff. I have also e-mailed toxicologists and mycologisits regarding the edibility of certain species and genera of mushrooms. I use all the resources combined to make 100% positive ID, and only eat a mushroom once I'm completely familiar with it.

    I would also recommend Orson K. Miller jr.s field guide, I believe it's called North American Mushrooms or something similar as well. It's issued by Falcon Press and goes into more detail on toxicity and genera info regarding edibility than most guides..
    all of those books hang out together in a little club house somewhere wishing they could be this book when they grow up.

    to go hand in hand with it, and because if you own a mushroom guide in print, you can be certain it's out of date; i recommend this website as well.
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    Senior Member cowgirlup's Avatar
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    Guess I will have to get another book.

    I just bought Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms of New England and Eastern Canada
    and Mushrooming Without Fear, The beginners guide to collecting safe and delicious mushrooms.

    The 2nd sounded good for a noob because it only foucses on a few types.
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