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Thread: What is a Good Container to Boil Water in?

  1. #41
    Senior Member Daniel Nighteyes's Avatar
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    Um, has anyone thought about getting one (or more) of those good ol' US Army stainless steel canteens from WWII? The cap is easily removed so that it doesn't suffer fire damage, and there are still a lot of 'em around -- but the prices are beginning to spike. Still, though, they're no more expensive than a modern-day stainless water bottle.

    Pair one with a canteen cup, and ya really got something. (I generally carried at least one stainless canteen and two cups.) If ya don't like the canteen rattling in the cup while you're traveling, just slip an old sock over the canteen before inserting into the cup. Voila! Blessed silence

    For ease of handling, throw a small pair of water-pump pliers in the bottom of the cover before inserting the canteen cup. (They're not easily found but they're out there, somewhere...) Toss in some of the large, commercial-sized coffee filters and a heavy rubber band, and you've got a field-expedient pre-filtering system to remove the dirt, silt and other solid stuff from the water before boiling it.

    -- Nighteyes

    PS: Here's what one looks like. Note the horizontal seam that separates top from bottom. Don't get the aluminum ones (seam goes vertical along the sides) because they'll get a dent if you look at 'em too hard.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Old-vintage-...item2ebc825257
    Last edited by Daniel Nighteyes; 03-21-2012 at 03:37 PM. Reason: more information


  2. #42
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Nighteyes View Post
    Um, has anyone thought about getting one (or more) of those good ol' US Army stainless steel canteens from WWII? The cap is easily removed so that it doesn't suffer fire damage, and there are still a lot of 'em around -- but the prices are beginning to spike. Still, though, they're no more expensive than a modern-day stainless water bottle.

    Pair one with a canteen cup, and ya really got something. (I generally carried at least one stainless canteen and two cups.) If ya don't like the canteen rattling in the cup while you're traveling, just slip an old sock over the canteen before inserting into the cup. Voila! Blessed silence

    For ease of handling, throw a small pair of water-pump pliers in the bottom of the cover before inserting the canteen cup. (They're not easily found but they're out there, somewhere...) Toss in some of the large, commercial-sized coffee filters and a heavy rubber band, and you've got a field-expedient pre-filtering system to remove the dirt, silt and other solid stuff from the water before boiling it.

    -- Nighteyes

    PS: Here's what one looks like. Note the horizontal seam that separates top from bottom. Don't get the aluminum ones (seam goes vertical along the sides) because they'll get a dent if you look at 'em too hard.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Old-vintage-...item2ebc825257
    Seems the Buy it now price is $9.99, but shipping is $10.78.......
    Yeah I know just posted as an example right?

    I like the cups and stoves, have a few of them, they seem to do what need them to do, don't know if I would want a steel canteen that's 70+ years old, the ones I seen are pretty nasty inside.

    When we were kids,... the local junk dealer had piles of them, along with the mess kits, for almost nothing....of course that was in the 50's and the guy would pretty much just give them away....but most were pretty nasty.
    Survival isn't a game...it's what you do when the game goes sideways.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Daniel Nighteyes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter63 View Post
    ... don't know if I would want a steel canteen that's 70+ years old, the ones I seen are pretty nasty inside.

    When we were kids,... the local junk dealer had piles of them, along with the mess kits, for almost nothing....of course that was in the 50's and the guy would pretty much just give them away....but most were pretty nasty.
    Yep, some are. The others, though, are fairly easy to clean with vinegar, hot water, a good dishwashing detergent, a good bottle brush, and patience (there's a lot of waiting/soaking time). Something I have seen my father do, but haven't tried it myself, is to fill the canteen about one-third to one-half full of "clean" sand, then top off with hot water, leaving enough room to slosh the contents around. Proceed to slosh enthusiastically, continuing until the sand has scoured the inside pretty well. Pour out, rinse out thoroughly, then continue with the vinegar, dishwashing liquid and bottle brush.

    Another thing -- replacement corks for the caps are pretty easy to find. In fact, I've got five extra replacement corks that I'll be happy to give away. They came in a package of ten. I used four and broke one.

    Something to watch for, though. Some of those WWII canteens were put away with water in them, and froze hard. That frequently caused the seam to open a bit -- not so you'd notice, but enough to get everything around it wet. The concave areas of said canteens generally appear to have "flattened out" or bulged a bit.

    -- Nighteyes

  4. #44
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Dirty, corroded, bad corks, and broken seams. Tell me how this is a good deal again? And how do you break a cork? That's as bad as breaking a ball bearing. Some guys, I'll tell ya.

    Toss in some BBs and give it a good shake. They will clean the insides right up. That's what I use on gas lantern tanks if they have a spot of rust in them. Works like a charm.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Thaddius Bickerton's Avatar
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    If one wishes to spend a bit, go to wally world etc and buy a "grease pot" from the cooking section. they tend to cost about $6 and make a very nice billy can. If you like you can remove the handle, and add a pot hanger of bailing wire. (seal the hole with a screw and rubber washer) Select your stove / heat source of choice from a pepsi can stove through a hobo stove through a commercial stove / wood fire using a key hole or dakota hole lay.Then go to camping section and spend about 3 dollars and buy a blue enameled mug. If you like add a bowl / and plate. add a spoon from the kitchen and your field knife and you have a complete camp cook set for not much.
    One can see the grease pot at the link below:
    http://cache.backpackinglight.com/ba...5892_18572.jpg

    Cans can also be used, and if you prefer use bailing wire or chain instead of coat hanger for pot hangers. Also use / carry a set of vise grip pliers or a multi tool to move hot stuff in and out of a fire.

    Also after a knife one of the most important items is a good dew rag of some type. I often carry a towel around my neck that can also pot holder, first aid, and any number of uses.

    Also remember that wood ashes will help wash up your stuff afterward.

    A millbanks bag, and boil the filtered water is a quick way to get potable water.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Daniel Nighteyes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Dirty, corroded, bad corks, and broken seams. Tell me how this is a good deal again?
    As time marches on, they get scarcer, and prices get higher, the deals get less and less "good", but bargains are still to be had. I bought two of mine at a gun show for 5 bucks each, and the other two at garage sales. Judicious application of the Mark I Mod 0 eyeball (and a bore light, which I always carry when attending gun shows) help a lot.

    I just happen to like 'em, and have been using them ever since I was 10 or 11.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    And how do you break a cork? That's as bad as breaking a ball bearing. Some guys, I'll tell ya.
    You do it by being in a hurry, getting frustrated, and failing to see the tiny defect in the cork that otherwise would have been okay. Such a happening is typically followed by embarrassment, uncharitable gestures, and language not entirely suitable for mixed company...

  7. #47
    Senior Member Thaddius Bickerton's Avatar
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    Since I got the yard sale camera to take a few more of my not so good photos I want to show my version of the soup can billy. (If it has plastic / paint etc in the inside, just build up a fire and burn it out real good then scrub it clean. I been using soup can billies ever since it got so hard to find metal coffee cans)

    The lid is just a bent up piece of aluminum foil. If you look you can see how the coat hanger wire is bent inside it to form a bail. Typical tin can construction billy. It's one of those large soup cans, or maybe it was a ravioli can , can't remember but now I think about it it was one of those larger sized ravioli cans. (Fed the kids lunch too LOL)

    Thad

    DCFC0015.jpg
    Last edited by Thaddius Bickerton; 05-02-2012 at 12:01 PM.
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  8. #48
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I don't think I'd cook in a billy that had been lined with plastic. You're probably right that it would burn up all the residue but I have to draw the line on that option unless it's all I had. As long as I have options I'll go with something else. But that's just me. All metal, unlined cans are getting harder and harder to find. They were pretty dang good back in the the day.

  9. #49
    Resident Wildman Wildthang's Avatar
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    Well I have cooked pork and beans in the can over a camp fire and ate them out of the can. I thought the plastic added a good flavor and extra body that they dont normally have. Then the flatulance set in and I had a beach ball in my pants

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