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Thread: Help me shoot a recurve bow

  1. #1

    Default Help me shoot a recurve bow

    my bucket list for firearms is complete (for now) and i want to pick up a recurve bow since its popular to shoot in backyards where i live. so what do i need besides the bow and some arrows? i know almost nothing about bows in general but i know i want a recurve for simplicity sake.

    any help?

    thanks


  2. #2
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    I am sure there are many archers among this group but I feel compelled to refer you to some of the many websites that specialize in archery.

    One might try ther Primitive Archer website, Trad Gang is also good.

    There are several others that I lost in a computer crash last year. I am sure you can link to many sites from the two I mentioned.

    There is also the Three Rivers Archery site that has all the gear one would ever need.

    I have a couple of 3D targets I use in the back yard and they also now make a kelvar net you can hang to catch stray arrows in close situations if you need to shoot toward the house or into a fence. Targets are available from most outfitters, at a reasonable price.

    I grew up shooting into hay bales, which work fine, but are growing very expensive in my area at $5 each. They are not very portable and tae up a good deal of space. With a net and 3D target you can roll things up and stash them in the garden shed.

    I once saw an Olympic shooter, on TV, who stood on his front sidewalk and shot through the open front door, out the back door and across the back yard to get his full practice range.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 05-06-2011 at 01:22 PM.
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  3. #3

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    You'll need a shooting tab or glove and probably an arm guard. If you've never shot a bow before get online as suggested above and/or go to the library and check out some books. See if your state has an archery association and find some local contacts. Go to any archery shop to ask for help too. They may not get too excited over your choice of bows but they should have the glove and armguard in stock.

    For what it's worth, I began with a recurve then went to a compound and have now switched back to recurves and long bows. They're much simpler and more fun in my opinion.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Hey there studderingdave - how about shooting on over to the Introduction Section and nocking up a little about yourself. Thanks.
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    Ed edr730's Avatar
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    The hardest thing for most new archers is listening to a good coach. Most can't. If you can. it will help you quite a bit. The most common mistake if you're right handed is.....after the shot the bow arm goes left, the release hand goes right and the neck sticks out to see where the shot went. Pay attention where your hands are three seconds after the shot. They should always be the same. Keep a loose grip on the bow, have a smooth release. I use a bow far less than I can handle because I believe accuracy is more important than poundage. Most don't seem to agree with me though. Good luck... practice.... and there is a lot more to it than that.

  6. #6

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    Several of the sportsmens clubs in the towns around me have archery teams and instruction.
    Check at your local Rod and Gun club. I've found them always welcoming to new blood.

    You could check out this book too:
    http://www.centervision.com/MMofArchery.html
    It an easy approach to the Zen attitude of archery. You can take it beyond once you get the basics down. The handgun book in this series has almost cured my flinch. Getting them in the black. Now working for the center.

    You won't get anything just by reading though. You have to practice. A lot.
    Last edited by LowKey; 05-06-2011 at 09:35 PM.

  7. #7
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    I shoot a recurve with no sights or other fancy stuff on it. The only tip I can give you is practice! Start close, maybe 15 feet away, guage your height and distance and when you are consistent, back up to 20 feet, and keep backing up as you get better. At about 50 feet I can keep 3 shots in a tea-saucer pattern. The advice about counting to 3 is also a good tip. It's true that we want to see where our arrow hit, but it's really not like your foam target is going to run off into the woods, so after you release, count to 3 before moving your arms.

  8. #8
    USMC retired 1961-1971 Beans's Avatar
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    Firearm shooters make the same mistake. Pull the trigger then jerk their head up to see where the bullets hits. The shot will go where is is aimed. If you miss you missed, If you hit, there is plenty of time to see where your shot hit.
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  9. #9
    Member bobzilla's Avatar
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    Above all else,make sure your arrows are rated for the lbs.of thrust of your bow,if the arrow breaks on the release stress,it could embed in your arm,this has happened at our Bowhunting club and you could lose an arm!

  10. #10
    hunter-gatherer Canadian-guerilla's Avatar
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    i have an old Bear 76'er takedown recurve ( paid $40 )

    like YCC said above, practice, practice, practice

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  11. #11
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    Draw...Anchor...Aim...Release.

    Feet shoulder width apart and in line.

    If you are shooting a recurve, shoot it straight up and down. You can work on canting after you've shot awhile.

    If you hit your arm, you're standing wrong.

    Don't cock your rist inwards.

    Always anchor at the same point. You can change your points until you find a point that is comfy for you.

    A shooters glove and arm guard is suggested but now required.

    Start with aluminum arrows. 2117's cover a variety of weights. Wood is good, but when you start you might as well take the diff. in wood arrows out of the picture.

    Start close and work your way out.

    Have fun and always, always end your session on a good shot.

  12. #12
    Member Mad Cow's Avatar
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    Be sure to get a bow stringer, bow square, and extra string. Be careful what you buy on ebay, and dont get sucked into the idea that 3 rivers is the only place to get your supplies. They aren't, and you can get your stuff cheaper elsewhere. The aluminum arrows is a good idea, they make for a quieter shot in my opinion due to there weight, but I shoot carbon for the simple fact that if they aren't straight they are broken. Don't get discouraged if you are not as accurate as you want to be at first. Focus on building good form first, then accuracy will follow. What bows you looking at ?

  13. #13
    Senior Member SARKY's Avatar
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    I'm partial to the takedown recurves as you can store them in a small space. I keep mine in a bag I made just for the bow, accessories and arrows. It's small, light and easy to grab and go!
    I know what hunts you.

  14. #14
    Member Mad Cow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SARKY View Post
    I'm partial to the takedown recurves as you can store them in a small space. I keep mine in a bag I made just for the bow, accessories and arrows. It's small, light and easy to grab and go!
    I made my a case for my bow from the pants leg of cammo pants and an old wool blanket. I also like the take downs. Im currently saving money for an aluminum riser and some limbs from dryad bows/

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