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Thread: Braintanning the simple (or overcomplicated) way

  1. #141
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    Picture 3, above, looks right, but at that point I would expect the grain to be off. What are you using to scrape?
    There is usually a definitive line where the grain is, and has been removed. Let me see if I can find a picture.


  2. #142
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    The raised places in this picture are leftover grain. The grain is much more yellow than the fiber network, where it has been removed.
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    We're going to figure this out. It won't hurt to leave it in a few days extra. As long as it doesn't start to smell rotten, you're okay.
    I know it's a lot of work, and it doesn't seem like you are making progress, but don't give up yet! We'll figure it out!
    Last edited by your_comforting_company; 12-11-2014 at 08:45 AM. Reason: added afterthought.

  3. #143
    Puff...the crashin' drago scottg's Avatar
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    I would LOVE to have the grain on the neck of my hide that you have in the picture above. I could take that off in 5 minutes. My neck is solid grain with very few spots of fiber network visible.

    I am using a "real" flesh knife. It is not very sharp, and I'm tempted.....

  4. #144
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    I use a drawknife with the handles straightened to the side and it is dull enough to draw across your arm without cutting your skin. Maybe this is part of the problem? I'm not entirely sure what a "fleshing knife" looks like. I assume something a bit like an ulu?

  5. #145
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Pretty sure a fleshing knife is just as you describe YCC.
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  6. #146
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    FYI......I made a fleshing knife/scrapper....old industrial hack saw blade.......teeth dulled down and the back side sharpened up a bit.....piece if broken banister rail for handles.....
    Works well....
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    Also used a wood "push paddle".....and a a old wood ironing board as a fleshing beam
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  7. #147
    Puff...the crashin' drago scottg's Avatar
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    Actually, this is the kind of fleshing knife I have:
    http://www.flemingoutdoors.com/12-in...ing-knife.html

    It is NOT sharp, not really a knife, in that sense, and is NOT like an ulu, IMO. It is really used to push off meat, fat, sinew, hair, and grain, from what I understand.

  8. #148
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottg View Post
    Actually, this is the kind of fleshing knife I have:
    http://www.flemingoutdoors.com/12-in...ing-knife.html

    It is NOT sharp, not really a knife, in that sense, and is NOT like an ulu, IMO. It is really used to push off meat, fat, sinew, hair, and grain, from what I understand.
    Correct...that kinda how it is.......
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  9. #149
    Puff...the crashin' drago scottg's Avatar
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    A few more pictures.

    I needed to put the hides away for a few days since I wasn't going to be able to work on them. So, I rinsed them real well and wrung some of the water out of them - just so they would have less water in them when I froze them. In the first and third pictures, you can see substantial grain (on the neck), but the rest is starting to look pretty good.

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    Here, except for some small patches of grain, this hide (I think) is really impressive. I'm happy (although tired)! This has NOT been brained / oil and soaped at all - just fleshed, bucked, grained, grained, grained, grained, grained, etc. rinsed.

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    I will be even more happy when I'm done with it!
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  10. #150
    Junior Member psecody's Avatar
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    I've enjoyed reading this thread a lot and have been given the inspiration I need to actually try some tanning this year. Thanks for making such an informative thread, it's a really interesting read.
    I thought of a question about the bucking part of the process. I noticed that you keep talking about time in the bucking solution and have noticed that your temperatures are always pretty low it seems whenever you're doing this. I only usually hunt during archery season (because I don't fare very well in the cold, I've been told it's a redhead thing haha) so when I shoot a deer it's usually around end of September or the first couple of weeks of October, so essentially we're still in summer weather here. You seem to let it sit roughly 2-3 days on average, from what I gather, in the bucking solution. I'm thinking with our temperatures these will be reduced by quite a bit? Or would it be best to just wait till about December/January till it gets colder? I guess what I'm asking is how hot is too hot to do this? EDIT: Forgot to mention that I plan on using mesquite ashes for the buck since we have that stuff growing everywhere around here.

    Thanks again for this interesting thread and the good explanation
    Last edited by psecody; 02-10-2015 at 08:34 AM.

  11. #151
    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    @ScottG Looks real good except on that neck. Keep at it, it'll come off!

    @psecody I would say anything above 70 degrees is too warm. Bacteria tend to grow rapidly as temps approach 80. This year, due to work and all the other projects I have going on, I have left some for as long as 6-8 days. This is really pushing it, but so far they have not become "rotten" while in the buck on very cold days (unusually cold this year?).
    Basically, if the hair will rub off with your fingers, it's ready to scrape.

  12. #152
    Senior Member wilderness medic's Avatar
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    Maybe too much of a purest mind set but I don't like the idea of rebraining with another animals brains. Is there a point in doing half the brains, smoking, then rebraining? Or would that leave you at the same level and be pointless?
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  13. #153

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    I know this is an old thread, but I just wanted to say thanks for all the information and photos. I registered just because of this thread.

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