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Thread: Diagnose this and give a treatment.

  1. #21
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Do you really want a diagnosis and treatment from a bunch of goof ball survivalists? Why don't you wait and see what the dr. says. Odds are he's a bit better at this than we are.


  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Do you really want a diagnosis and treatment from a bunch of goof ball survivalists? Why don't you wait and see what the dr. says. Odds are he's a bit better at this than we are.
    The idea was for people to practice a little. What happens if you can not see a doctor and some one you are responsible for comes down with similar symptoms?
    I see the doctor tomorrow afternoon and should get some real info. Just thought this would be interesting for folks.

  3. #23
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Indeed it is. Let us know what he says if you care to share.

  4. #24
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    What happens if you can not see a doctor and some one you are responsible for comes down with similar symptoms?
    one of several things, to include: an appropriate diagnosis with the opportunity to make a decision which might alter the health outcome, an appropriate diagnosis without such an opportunity, an inappropriate diagnosis with out such an opportunity, or an inappropriate diagnosis with the opportunity to make a potentially dangerous decision which might affect health outcome. It's a double edged sword.

    Symptom based diagnosis is only of so much value to trained healthcare prefessionals, and like any medical decision making can be dangerous if misused.

    with that said, reasonable people with a cautious approach can definitely benefit from an improved understanding of medicine.
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  5. #25

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    My first impression was hormone therapy/menopause, but with your extensive history your body could present atypically for many GI problems. How long after you eat is the onset? and is it with every meal? (small meals, snacks, large meals, fried food, dry food)?
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  6. #26
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Welcome almostbarefoot. How about heading over to the Introduction section and tell us a bit about yourself?

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by almostbarefoot View Post
    My first impression was hormone therapy/menopause, but with your extensive history your body could present atypically for many GI problems. How long after you eat is the onset? and is it with every meal? (small meals, snacks, large meals, fried food, dry food)?
    I am male so the who menopause thing is out, I hope. I usually get the fever with in 20-30 minutes of eating and lasts for two to three hours after wards I break out in a heavy sweat.

    In the last week I have been keeping better track of what I eat. It seems that the heavier the meal the worse the fever. The type of food is not as important. I get a fever every time I eat anything, but slowing the intake does reduce the effects. ( this is something my wife and I figured out last night.)

    I see the doc this afternoon and will keep everyone informed

  8. #28

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    I think it's the pumpkin spice in the coffee.

  9. #29

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    Some folks get postprandial heart ischemia or angina that results in sweating. Fever seems pretty unusual though for that. And you're only 38...

    There's some neuroendocrine tumors that occur in the GI tract and cause things like flushing and sweats. And diarrhea 80% of the time. Symptoms can be triggered by meals. If you had diarrhea you would probably need to be evaluated for this (and Crohn's/UC)

    If there were more pain one would think of gall bladder problems - you don't have pain or a gallbladder.

    There are some folks with celiac disease who complain of fever/chills after eating meals with gluten in them.


    Did your doc do any labs? We are anxious to hear what they said.
    Last edited by beetlejuicex3; 10-26-2010 at 07:25 PM. Reason: grammar...sheesh

  10. #30

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    No one has mentioned HIV...
    No offense meant, it's an equal-opportunity disease now though.
    I certainly hope not.

  11. #31
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    I'm glad you are seeing your doc. I've got no idea what could be causing your condition. Googling "fever after eating food" gives some possibilities, but without any medical training in the area, I would not be comfortable even speculating.
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  12. #32

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    Just got back from the doc's and she was stumped. My last set of labs looked good and so does my heart. No problems with my thyroid either. She drew more blood and will call me with results. She is now looking into infections and glucose levels.

  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by klickitat View Post
    Just got back from the doc's and she was stumped. My last set of labs looked good and so does my heart. No problems with my thyroid either. She drew more blood and will call me with results. She is now looking into infections and glucose levels.
    Not to be insensitive, but this is pretty fascinating. Allergy to gluten or wheat perhaps (or more likely a byproduct of their breakdown in your GI tract)? Always the ever-present possibility of cancer (I hope not, very atypical symptoms).
    20-30 minutes is generally about how long it takes food to make it to your lower bowels; though each person is different. IBS, lupus (or some other auto-immune disorder).
    On the edge of my seat to find out more if you're willing to share.
    Wishing you well.
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  14. #34

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    I have nothing to worry about. If it is some sort of ugly thing then I die. I am at peace with God and am not worried, so please do not be apologetic about things. It is what it is and there is nothing to do but figure it out and move forward.

    No one is being insensitive and you are not going to offend me.

  15. #35
    Senior Member BENESSE's Avatar
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    Late to the exchange but...
    I only have one suggestion: if the doc. hasn't asked for this, it's worth bringing it up, just in case: CRP Blood Test (C reactive protein test)
    http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/c...ve-protein-crp
    (Have gone through this with my mom and it proved very valuable.)

    A C-reactive protein (CRP) test is a blood test that measures the amount of a protein called C-reactive protein in your blood. C-reactive protein measures general levels of inflammation in your body. High levels of CRP are caused by infections and many long-term diseases. But a CRP test cannot show where the inflammation is located or what is causing it. Other tests are needed to find the cause and location of the inflammation.

    This test could at the very least rule out some things since your condition doesn't seem so clear cut. And it's just a blood draw, nothing more.

  16. #36
    Senior Member tacmedic's Avatar
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    It would seem to me that since it seems to be worse after eating a larger meal, that it has to do with the quantity of food that you are eating. I see from your list of food that you generally don't eat very much and if you have a larger meal than normal your body may just be reacting to the increased supply of calories by raising your basal metabolic rate to digest everything. Similar to a "dumping" syndrome that sometimes happens to people who have had portions of their bowel removed, but without the N/V that usually goes with it.
    "When young men seek to be like you, when lazy men resent you, when powerful men look over their shoulder at you, when cowardly men plot behind your back, when corrupt men wish you were gone and evil men want you dead; Only then will you have done your share." -Phil Messina

  17. #37
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Dumping syndrome. I guess I have that about once a day. Settle down all of you. I'm talking about emptying the coffee pot. Sheeeesh with you!

  18. #38

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    doc called and said all labs looked good. Now I am puking after eating though. I have another appointment in two weeks.

  19. #39

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    Did you tell the doc about the puking.
    That could be bad going on two weeks.

  20. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by LowKey View Post
    Did you tell the doc about the puking.
    That could be bad going on two weeks.
    yes and she said go to the ER if it gets bad. Really? thanks doc.

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