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Thread: backwoods menu/Wild tea.

  1. #221

    Default no snow

    last time it snowed here was like 1995. those pics were taken yesterday (new site)


  2. #222
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Well the site is sweet. You did a nice job. Now, about not snowin' since 1995. Is Alabama actually in the U.S.?
    Last edited by Rick; 12-22-2007 at 08:40 PM.

  3. #223
    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    You would be hard pressed to find anything greasier than a goose. But I will say this, there is nothing better for a cold than goose grease generously applied to the chest and covered with a flannel rag!
    You have never eaten racoon then ,eh Rick? greasy.
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  4. #224
    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
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    As far as painting the hutches go Pan (checked out your site) just remember ,the rabbits are gonna chew on everything around them,paint included,so painting them may not be such a good idea.
    Soular powered by the son.

    Nell, MLT (ASCP)

  5. #225
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    wow, thanks Rick. you really didn't have to take that time to browse the book for me. thank you very much. that is really helpful. i gotta find me a copy of that book.
    thanks again guys.

  6. #226
    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    Default dude

    chapters i know they have em in T O

  7. #227
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Indeed I have. I think I posted somewhere else on that. Anyway, I agree, a coon is a greasy little critter but so is a fat goose.

  8. #228

    Smile Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by nell67 View Post
    As far as painting the hutches go Pan (checked out your site) just remember ,the rabbits are gonna chew on everything around them,paint included,so painting them may not be such a good idea.
    Yea I was mainly talkin about painting the exterior. But had considered the inside too because it wil be easier to sanitize. But thanks for the thought. Ill probably paint the inside too and make sure they have plenty of toys and chew wood. Maybe it'll go well. If not I guess I'll build all wire cages next time. But with free Materials, hey, if they last a year or two and dont make my rabbits sick... Kool

  9. #229

    Talking Good Food

    Yea got the ever last night so today i went a picked some Dandelion and mustard and coocked up a big pot with some ham hock. I ate it all and drank the flavorfull liquer. Man was it good. I may have over done it a little though. Did I mention that dandelion and mustard are both GOOD COLON CLEANSERS! So anyone who is in a survival situation eat in moderation till your stomach is tuned in to the wild again.

  10. #230
    Senior Member corndog-44's Avatar
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    Default Buttermilk Fried Carp Fillets

    2 pounds carp fillets
    1 cup buttermilk
    1 cup biscuit mix or pancake mix
    2 teaspoons salt
    1/4 teaspoon dried lemon flakes

    Method:
    Take your carp fillets and cut them into chunks. Place each chunk fillet piece into a shallow dish or pan for coating. Next you will pour the buttermilk over the chunk fillet pieces. Allow the fish to stand for a half hour in the buttermilk, making sure to turn the pieces over once during that time. Stir the salt into the biscuit mix. Remove the fillets from the buttermilk and coat them in the biscuit mix. Cover both sides. Fry the carp fillets in a deep fryer or hot oil in a frying pan will do. Fry the pieces for 5 - 10 minutes until they are both cooked through and brown on all sides. (Note: If the oil is too hot, the fillets will brown too fast and not cook through.) Remove them to drain on paper towels. Serve the fillets with lemon wedges, or sauce if desired.

    Serves 4-6

  11. #231
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Aw, jeese, Corndog. Carp? Those things have so many bones it scares an orthopedic surgeon. Grinnell are too skinny. Dogfish, well they just look so sad with those pouty little lips hanging down. How 'bout Long John Silvers?

  12. #232
    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
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    Talking Yeah, what he said!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Aw, jeese, Corndog. Carp? Those things have so many bones it scares an orthopedic surgeon. Grinnell are too skinny. Dogfish, well they just look so sad with those pouty little lips hanging down. How 'bout Long John Silvers?
    Carp is just "Crap" misspelled!
    SARGE
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  13. #233
    Senior Member corndog-44's Avatar
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    One good thing about trash fish is there are no limits or seasons...fits well with wilderness survival.

    I like my carp around 7-10 lbs. It's a good idea to remove the midlateral strip of darker flesh before cooking; it can infuse the meat with a strong, musky flavor. Carp bakes, fries, and poaches nicely but I don't care for canned carp. The draw-back of carp is the mossy, earthy flavor sometimes evident in carp tends to be stronger in the warmer months; carp harvested from November to April will have less of a river-bottom taste.
    Last edited by corndog-44; 12-24-2007 at 04:01 AM.

  14. #234

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    Some folks in Pa. would catch suckers in early spring. While the water is still cold. Claiming their bones were softer at this time. Grind them up and make fish patties with them. I've tried them and they werent to bad. But that was the first and last time I ever tried 'em. I Love to fish but can wait for a nice catfish or bass or anything that aint got lips the size of my washing machine boot. However in a pinch ..............
    Elk dont know how many legs a horse got

  15. #235
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Hmmm. Maybe there's a reason that carp don't have a season or a limit.

  16. #236
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    If you are cooking over a campfire, here's a handy reference chart to guage the temperature of the fire

    Temp.............Type of Fire........# of Secs you can hold your hand over coals
    250-325..............Slow..................6 - 8 sec
    325-400..............Medium..............4 - 5 sec
    400-500..............Hot...................2 - 3 sec
    > 500.................Very Hot............1 sec

    You can also use the "Mississippi" test. Holding your hand 20 inches over the coals, count 1 Mississippi, 2 Mississippi, 3 Mississippi and so on. A medium to slow fire will let you hold you hand over the coals about 6 counts. A hot fire only 2 or 3.
    Last edited by Rick; 12-26-2007 at 08:56 PM.

  17. #237
    Senior Member RBB's Avatar
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    There is a portion of cat-tails that is edible in winter, but retrieving it takes time and effort.

    There is always reindeer moss - at least that's what I think it is called - the cancerous warty tubular looking stuff that grows on rocks all over the Canadian shield. Tasteless and terrible, it will keep you alive. You can also make spruce tea - which will give you vitamins including (I believe) vitamin C.

  18. #238
    Senior Member corndog-44's Avatar
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    Default Crawfish Boil

    10 pounds crawfish
    2 3-ounce packages Crab Boil Seasoning
    4 ears corn, each cut into 3-inch pieces
    1 1/2 pounds small red potatoes
    1 gallon water
    1 large lemon, cut into quarters
    8 medium white onions, peeled
    4 artichokes, each cut in half
    3 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
    1/4 cup hot sauce (Louisiana hot sauce, Baumer Foods Crystal or McIlhenny Tabasco)
    1/2 cup salt or Creole Seasoning
    1 pound andouille sausage or kielbasa, cut into 2-inch pieces

    In very large saucepot with removable wire basket, heat water, crab boil, salt, hot sauce and lemon to boiling. Add onions, artichokes, carrots and potatoes; heat to boiling. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Carefully remove vegetables.

    To boiling mixture, add corn, crawfish and sausage; over high heat to boiling. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 5 to 8 minutes until crawfish are tender. Carefully remove.

    To serve, arrange vegetables, crawfish and sausage on large platter or place on newspaper or brown paper. Serve with plenty of cold beer and French bread.

    Serves 8.

  19. #239
    Senior Member corndog-44's Avatar
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    Default backwoods menu/Wild tea.

    What is your usual menu when out and about in the woods? Mine is wild meat or fish, bread cooked in a skillet and coffee.

  20. #240
    reclinite automaton canid's Avatar
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    always take sticky cornbread, bannock [pretty much bread product you can mix ahead of time, add water and cook in a pan or over/under embers, which is a long list], coffee or yerba mate, brown sugar, nuts, a bag of my secret curry mix, dried greens during deep summer, or winter if i'm in a northern/montaine area and beyond that, it sort of depends on what i have on hand.

    i usualy try to use what greens, roots, fruit, nuts and meat i can find localy where it is available. if there are rivers or lakes or an ocean nearby, i tend to plan my trips around them. there is a tlingit/haida proverb that when the tide is out, the beach will be your table and when the tide is in; the forest.
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