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Thread: backwoods menu/Wild tea.

  1. #201
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I just ran across this article at:

    http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ad...ants-0610.html

    "Toss It: Dandelions are high in vitamin A, calcium, and iron and can also be surprisingly tasty. "The trick," says John Kallas, "is to harvest them in late winter or early spring, when they're getting moisture from the soil and very little direct sunlight." Julienne the leaves and sprinkle them onto a salad; boil them for three minutes and eat them like you would cooked greens (it's best to discard the lower third of the leaf); or use the petals to make a dandelion soup."

    I eat dandelions all summer long but never thought about using them in the winter. I just thought they froze over winter.

    EDIT: I found another article on Native American Cuisine. If you scroll down, there is a list of edible plants with links to articles about most of them.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_cuisine
    Last edited by Rick; 12-19-2007 at 07:43 PM.


  2. #202
    Senior Member corndog-44's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trax View Post
    I've seen deer, they almost never let their meat loaf.
    I saw a couple of deer today that let their meat loaf...come to think about it, maybe they were taking a break from foraging.

  3. #203
    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
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    Cool Speaking of Deer...

    Anybody catch the news blurb about the guy who found the Deer in his living room when he came home from walking his dog? He had to wrestle it to the floor! It had messed itself up pretty bad breaking through a window and had to be put dow. The guy's saying he's having that Deer for Christmas dinner!
    SARGE
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."
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  4. #204
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    That's pretty forgiving, Sarge. I mean the guy finds a deer that's broken into his house and then invites him to dinner? What a sweet guy.

  5. #205
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I found a really great site with a lot of information on edible plants. There are a couple of dead links on it but a lot that do work and lead to other good sources (including this forum).

    http://therucksack.tripod.com/edibleplants.htm

    Bon Appetite!

  6. #206
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    coooool, thanks a lot people, and thanks for the links Rick !

  7. #207
    Senior Member corndog-44's Avatar
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    Default Fried Soft Shell Turtle

    2 lbs. turtle meat, cut into 2-4 inch pieces
    1/2 cup red wine vinegar
    1 tsp. salt
    1/2 cup all-purpose flour
    1/4 cup plus 1 tbsp. milk
    2 eggs, separated
    2 tsp. Bacon fat
    1/8 tsp. salt
    I pt. Wesson oil


    Combine turtle, vinegar, and 1 tsp. salt. Cover with water; simmer 1 hour or until tender. Drain and set aside.

    Combine flour, milk, egg yolks, olive oil, and 1/8 tsp. salt; mix well. Beat egg whites until stiff; fold into batter.

    Dip turtle pieces into batter; fry until golden brown in deep oil heated to 375 degrees F. Drain well on paper towels. Yield: 4-6 servings.

  8. #208
    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    yo baxter i think that orangevill has a wild edibles club also look up ontario wild edibles and aslo common lawn mushrooms also go to wildwood survival he is ontario based great info he has lots of websites..

  9. #209
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    yep, i already know about wildwood survival, i had already checked the wild edibles there but it hadn't mentioned any of the plants that would be edible in winter. it is a great site though. and i'm gonna check the orangeville club, i think i may have stumbled upon there site once....

    thanks wareagle.

  10. #210
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I took some time and browsed through my field guide of edible plants and pulled out only those that are edible during the winter months. I looked for any plant that said All Year or any that specified the winter season. This information comes from:

    Edible Wild Plants of Eastern/Central North America. A Peterson Field Guide

    I highly recommend this book. There is just a ton of information in it.

    A couple of words of caution. I make no claims about the validity of the information. Many of these plants I have never eaten or identified in the field so I don't want your survivors to send their process server to my door because you croaked on something. Also, the field guide offers cautionary statements on some of these plants because they can sting or cause a dermatological reaction if touched. That sort of stuff. In addition, there are look alike plants for some of these that are poisonous. KNOW WITH CERTAINTY WHAT YOU ARE HARVESTING BEFORE YOU EAT IT! If in doubt leave it alone. That said:

    Edible Winter Plants

    Labrador Tea leaves
    Horseradish roots
    Watercress leaves and stems
    Spurge Nettle – Tread Softly tubers
    Spikenard, Life-of-Man roots
    Wintergreen, Checkerberry leaves
    Wild Leek or Ramp bulbs
    Day Lilly tubers
    Water or Purple Avens roots
    Black Crowberry fruit
    Wild Onion bulbs
    Groundnut tubers
    Lamb’s Quarter, Pigweed seeds (fall - early winter)
    Amaranths seeds (fall – early winter)
    Cattail (small horned shaped sprouts at the end of the root stock) winter,
    Cranberry fruit
    Balsam Fir pitch
    Pines needles
    Black Crowberry fruit (late summer – winter)
    Saw Palmetto terminal bud
    Wild Raisins fruit
    Yaupon, Cassina leaves
    American Hackberry fruit
    Common Spicebush twigs and bark
    Redbay leaves
    Sycamore Sap (late winter)
    Creeping Snowberry, Moxie-Plum leaves
    Wintergreen Chuckerberry leaves
    Chufa, Yellow Nut Grass tubers
    Dulse fronds
    Irish Moss fronds
    Edible Kelp midrib, lateral fronds
    Laver fronds
    Sea Lettuce fronds
    Rock Tripe entire plant
    Reindeer Moss entire plant
    Iceland Moss entire plant

    There is no doubt some plants are missing from this list. Some indicated the plant was good during a specific month, December for example, and I did not include it. If you learn how to identify all of these there's little chance you'll go hungry while in the bush.
    Last edited by Rick; 12-21-2007 at 12:55 PM.

  11. #211
    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    How many egg yokes, how much olive oil? Cause I'll try it.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

  12. #212
    Senior Member corndog-44's Avatar
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    Eggs yokes from the 2 separated eggs. 2 tsp. olive oil.

  13. #213
    Senior Member corndog-44's Avatar
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    Default Roast Wild Goose

    Wild Goose
    Salt and pepper
    Chopped onions
    Chopped celery
    Apple slices
    Thin bacon slices
    Dry red wine
    Flour for gravy

    Allow one pound of Goose per person. Dry them thoroughly inside and out and rub inside with salt. Fill the insides with onions, apple and celery. Place in an uncovered roasting pan, cover breasts with bacon. Add dry red wine and cook in a 325 degree oven for 10-12 minutes per pound for rare Gooses (really marvelous), 15-20minutes per pound for well done. Baste frequently with drippings to which the dry red wine was added.

    Mix cold water with drippings and thicken with flour for gravy.

  14. #214

    Default Never eaten goose

    i've never eaten goose but here is how my grand dad told was the only way to cook it.

    1 cleaned goose
    1 large presure cooker
    1 cedar plank
    salt and pepper

    Salt and pepper goose. split cedar plank in two pieces and place in gooses cavity. Place goose and plank in cooker and seal. Cook for 2 hours. Let cooker cool. open , discard goose and eat the board! serves 2

    I guess he didnt like goose.
    but your recipemakes me doubt ole Gran Dad

  15. #215
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    You would be hard pressed to find anything greasier than a goose. But I will say this, there is nothing better for a cold than goose grease generously applied to the chest and covered with a flannel rag!

  16. #216
    Protector Of The Land MedicineWolf's Avatar
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    I've eaten the stems and bulbs of lilly pads all year round, they are a tad bit bitter but easily found in ponds and along rivers here in Montana. Have a slightly bitter taste but not that bad and great for throwing in stews.

  17. #217

    Default Winter forage

    here there are wild mustard greens and dandilions are in bloom (South Alaqbama) look here for my pics of them http://www.freewebs.com/clarkshomestead/wildedibles.htm

  18. #218

    Default Man meat

    My nephew just told me that he was watching somthing last night that said if you have to eat a partner, eat the liver. Most nutritious part.

  19. #219
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Still in bloom? Dude, that is just sooooo wrong. There's snow on the ground for pity's sake. Well, at least here there is.
    Last edited by Rick; 12-22-2007 at 08:39 PM.

  20. #220
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Did you look at him with an insidious smile and just agree? "Where exactly is your liver, nephew? Can you point it out for me?"

    Or just say, "I've always thought so."

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