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Thread: backwoods menu/Wild tea.

  1. #441
    Senior Member randyt's Avatar
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    thanks for the info Rick. Figured I would have to settle for whatever I could get and then modify them for my purpose. Even a used set of spikes are pricey, probably worth it but much for my budget. I found a set on craigslist for 35 dollars but couldn't break away to check them out, that fits more into my budget. I know a lot of lineman and should put the word out.
    so the definition of a criminal is someone who breaks the law and you want me to believe that somehow more laws make less criminals?


  2. #442
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    If you know any telephone or cable TV guys they might be able to help you as well. Some companies provide the equipment, some don't so that will govern whether they can help you. Anyone that works out of the IBEW hall should be able to help especially if they know someone retiring.

  3. #443
    Woodsman Adventure Wolf's Avatar
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    Freshly caught fish, because who doesn't like to cook fresh fish over a campfire? I think the proper name for them are wineberries, best description is basically like wild raspberries that grow just about everywhere in the mountains of North Carolina. Great berries for homemade wine in case you didn't catch that from the name. Then for the third, I will pick red clover which is a leafy green that can be paired with dandelions and other wild vegetables to make a salad.

  4. #444
    Epic Crazy Idiot ElisaTheDuck's Avatar
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    My favourite medicinal plants that I use in teas:
    -Spearmint, wild mint, water mint
    -German and wild chamomile
    -Red clover
    -Yarrow
    -St. John's wort
    -Goldenrod
    -Self-heal
    -Raspberry leaves
    -Blackberry leaves
    -Mullein
    -Yellow woodsorrel
    -Horsetail
    -Valerian
    -Burdock
    -Indian pipe
    -Dandelion

    Favourite medicinal plants applied topically:
    -Spotted jewelweed
    -Yarrow

    Favourite edibles:
    -Parsnips
    -Dandelions
    -Cattail
    -Purslane
    -Yellow woodsorrel
    -Indian cucumber

    Favourite fruiting plants:
    -Flowering raspberry (not very well known but has fuzzy stems, NO thorns, leaves shaped like maple leaves, flowers that look like roses, and best of all, it has delicious raspberries that taste like a fruit salad)
    -Blackberry and thimbleberry
    -Raspberry
    -Blueberry
    -Strawberry

    Favourite mushrooms:
    -Reishi
    -Chanterelles
    -Morels
    Last edited by ElisaTheDuck; 08-30-2015 at 03:54 PM.

  5. #445
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    ETD
    On your list of edibles......

    That wouldn't be wild parsnip would it?...That stuff is nasty.
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  6. #446
    Epic Crazy Idiot ElisaTheDuck's Avatar
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    Wild parsnips are very tasty if you know when to harvest them and how to prepare them. They taste the best when you harvest the first year roots as late into autumn as you can but before any heavy frosts, then you can prepare them like cultivated parsnips eg: in stews, soups, etc.

  7. #447
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElisaTheDuck View Post
    Wild parsnips are very tasty if you know when to harvest them and how to prepare them. They taste the best when you harvest the first year roots as late into autumn as you can but before any heavy frosts, then you can prepare them like cultivated parsnips eg: in stews, soups, etc.
    We have a lot of both the wide parsnip and pigweed in our area.......BAD NEWS.

    I for one would advise everyone to stay away from Wild parsnip....
    My experience, and DW's has been severe burns for the juice as it is sunlight sensitive....and can get you later.

    I don't know where you are getting the information, or have ever tried it.....but I'm not sure how you can tell first year roots, etc.?
    But to me it's not worth messing with.....(actually I don't like domestic parsnips...so wouldn't bother with wild either.)

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  8. #448
    Epic Crazy Idiot ElisaTheDuck's Avatar
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    I know all about the problems with wild parsnip juice, but I haven't had any reaction with it yet, even though I spend a lot of time handling the plants. I suppose it's just because I'm careful not to squeeze the juices out of the plant. And about your question concerning the roots, the wild parsnip is a biennial, meaning it only lives for two years. In the first year, biennial plants form a rosette of leaves on the ground, and in the second year, they grow tall and produce seeds. Wild parsnip roots are too woody in the second year, so first year roots are ideal because they are softer. And if you were wonder why you should harvest the roots in autumn, it's because the plant starts to withdraw all the glucose from its leaves to keep the root alive, just like most plants and trees do. Thus, the root becomes much sweeter.

  9. #449
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Around here wild parsnips are brush hogged, and sprayed with weed killer.....Hope fully there are no second year plants.

    The are an evasive pain in the what ever touches it...

    You can have mine.....

    And will reiterate.....
    To the general populous coming to this forum to seek solid advice.....
    Don't mess with wild parsnip
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  10. #450
    Epic Crazy Idiot ElisaTheDuck's Avatar
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    If the wild parsnips in your area have a tall stem growing from the centre and have yellow flowers, they're in their second year. But yes, to people who don't want burns, it would be best to avoid wild parsnips.

  11. #451
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    Wild parsnip seems to be a plant of mixed blessings...and maledictions. The root is delicious enough to have many devotees, but the sap can be very, very painful if conditions are right.

    I am just too chicken to harvest it myself, but if someone gave me a bowl of stewed or roasted wild parsnips, I'd gladly take it.


    http://wwx.inhs.illinois.edu/research/vmg/parsnip/

    The edible roots of wild parsnip were consumed in ancient Greece and Rome and cultivars are still grown for food today. The root develops its sweet taste after being exposed to cold. Some people are sensitive to the touch of the leaves and soon develop a rash if their skin contacts the leaves or plant sap in the presence of sunlight. A very painful rash can develop that in some people leaves scars that can persisit for several months or longer. Wild parsnip is most irritating at the time of flowering.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/poisonou...l-your-summer/

    ...a summer stroll could turn into a stay in the hospital if you get your hands on harmless-looking poisonous plants.

    One Iowa man is warning about the wild parsnip, a poisonous plant that looks like wildflowers, dill or Queen Anne's Lace.

    When Jack Boyt's son got in contact with the plant while mowing, his arms were covered in burns, blisters and welts.

    "It was bad, worse than anything he's ever had," Boyt told CBS News.

    Wild parsnip originated in Europe where its roots were eaten, according to Iowa State University. It flowers mostly from May through July.

    The plant contains a substance called psoralen that when touched and subsequently put under sunlight, could cause a reaction known as "phytophotodermatitis."

    That can lead to reddening of the skin, a rash, and blisters, burning and scalding pain.

    Dark red or brownish skin discoloration appears where the burn or blisters first formed, and can last for several months.


    That's more juju than I care to risk.
    Last edited by Grizzlyette Adams; 09-01-2015 at 03:34 AM.
    Genius is making a way out of no way.

  12. #452

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    Wild any edible forest mushroom and wild strawberries for dessert


    http://survival-skills.eu/

  13. #453
    Super Moderator crashdive123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by survival-skills View Post
    Wild any edible forest mushroom and wild strawberries for dessert
    It might be the language difference, but I have no idea what you are saying.
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  14. #454

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    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    It might be the language difference, but I have no idea what you are saying.
    I think it may have been a case of not enough backspacing, nor enough context.

    I'll assume that the statement is that [survival-skills enjoys] any edible wild mushroom with wild strawberries, eaten together as desert.

  15. #455
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eastree View Post
    I think it may have been a case of not enough backspacing, nor enough context.

    I'll assume that the statement is that [survival-skills enjoys] any edible wild mushroom with wild strawberries, eaten together as desert.
    I would hope someone would be a little more specific......lots of nasty stuff out there as well as good stuff.
    Or maybe he was just pushing his on line survival site?
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  16. #456
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    Sauteed morel, wild leek (ramp), and fiddle-head or asparagus is a great way to welcome spring.

  17. #457
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jigginup View Post
    Sauteed morel, wild leek (ramp), and fiddle-head or asparagus is a great way to welcome spring.
    Hunter63 saying Hey and Welcome.......Have a place on the Kickapoo River in SW Wisconsin......
    Where are you from?

    The is an intro section to say Hello at:

    http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...-Introductions
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  18. #458

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    Mulberry's...clover...are so far all Ihave trusted myself to Id and eat but as i learn more about it from you all I will be trying much more..as this forum will be my school as i am very anti social

  19. #459

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    Quote Originally Posted by Go_army2 View Post
    Frog legs and craw dads!
    Makin my mouth water with that one - YUM ! But you forgot turtle !

    I also like lambs quarter, cat tail roots, mulberries, black berries, dandelion fritters (fried flowers), sassafras tea, wild mint tea and just about any fish that swims, squirrel, rabbit, quail, grouse, doves, groundhog, and deer just to name a few.
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  20. #460
    Senior Member LarryB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingFisher907 View Post
    since you asked us to keep it confined to flora, I will definitely have to go with:
    #1- Morell mushrooms, they're just deee-licious!
    #2- Alaskan blueberries or raspberries
    #3- Alaskan cloudberries
    Thanks for your contribution KingFisher and for staying on track. lb
    Have a super one...

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