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Thread: backwoods menu/Wild tea.

  1. #41
    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Default It's starting to look like

    We need a recipe thread and Beowulf just needs to publish a cookbook, LOL. Just kidding, bro, definitely keep 'em coming.
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"


  2. #42
    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    This is a recipe thread, damn canucks... lol... how about a Moose meat recipe... lol
    seriously thoug I wanna try some moose meat.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

  3. #43
    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Default I've already

    Substituted moose for the deer and elk in your recipes. My all time favorite is to cut thin strips of caribou and fry them up with my eggs for breakfast, doesn't require a recipe. Always with fresh oven baked bannock.
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

  4. #44
    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beowulf65 View Post
    ELK STEAK by Beo
    2 lbs. elk round, cut 1-inch thick
    6 Tablsp. flour
    2 tsp. salt
    1/4 tsp. pepper
    1 teaspoon of crushed red pepper
    4 medium onions
    6 Tablsp. shortening
    1/2 cup chopped celery
    1 clove garlic, minced
    3/4 cup chili sauce
    3/4 cup water
    1 cup green pepper, chopped
    1 can tomato sauce
    Combine flour , pepper, crushed red peppers and salt. Pound into both sides of elk round with side of plate or a mallet or the forehead of your youngest child.
    Cut into seving-size portions. Peel and slice onions.
    Heat skillet. Brown onions lightly.
    Remove from skillet and add shortening.
    Brown elk steak on both sides.
    Place elk steak in greased cake pan with celery, garlic, chili sauce, tomato sauce, green pepper and onions. Pour over steak.
    Cover and bake at 350 degrees for 2 hours or untill done.
    Or throw on the grill or open fire for a damn good meal
    Or cover in a tin baking dish and bury in the coals of an open fire?
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

  5. #45

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    Try this:

    Here is a recipe for "Basic Bannock" from the book Trail Food by Alan Kesselheim. It is a bread but made in a skillet.

    1/2 C white flour
    1/2 C wheat flour
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    3 tablespoons powdered milk

    Add water a little at a time till dough is sticky.
    Divide into 4 balls and flatten and heat in a lightly oiled skillet
    till done.

    I have 12 pages of recipes for bannock.

    I have a back pack dutch oven, I constructed from a camping set I have. I bake bread and cake out in the wilds as often as I can. I have also done a pumpkin pie once. Campmore offers a 5 piece Sierra Gook Set that works well for baking. That is for one or two persons. The inner pot is a 3 cup and the oven part is a 6 cup.

    If you pre mix at home. Bread is one of the easiest things to make over am open fire or camp stove.

    www.MiniBull.com (Tiny) has a video on his sight that you can download. It shows how to bake bread on an alcohol stove. This would work for most any heat source you have.

    Don
    No one knows more about a task then the person that does it, Practice makes perfect!

  6. #46
    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Default Rabbit recipe #1

    Roasted rabbit, by Elmer Fudd

    1. Kill rabbit
    2. Skin and gut rabbit
    3. Build fire
    4. Poke green stick through dead rabbit.
    5. shove end of stick into ground near fire
    6.Suspend rabbit on stick over fire, turn occassionally
    7. Add salt and pepper to taste
    8.Eat Rabbit
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

  7. #47
    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Default Derivations of rabbit recipe #1

    by trax

    Follow above recipe

    A. Gather wild raspberries into a bowl or pail (couple of hands full)
    B. Crush raspberries into a mooshy mess
    C. Slowly drizzle mooshy berry mess over rabbit while it cooks
    D. Substitutes for rabbit include: grouse, ptarmigan, duck, muskrat.
    E. Enjoy with bannock from enclosed recipes that you prepared while rabbit is cooking
    F. Rabbit should turn slightly crispy on the outside from the berry glaze.
    G. Fire should be low and hot, roasting should be done slowly for thoroughness.
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

  8. #48
    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Default Cooking notes

    I would substitute most wild meats for one another in Beowulf's recipes. Spicing etc is a matter of personal taste. If the reader wishes to follow the Elmer Fudd rabbit recipe but make stew instead, the rabbit should come with his own large carrot, but may be very difficult to kill
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

  9. #49
    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Elmer Fudd was the ultimate hunter in small game, just used too light a load.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

  10. #50
    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Also try this recipe in extreme survival situation: Man Meat Roast
    One dead partner
    cut in chunks
    add herbs to your liking
    spit on stick over open fire
    cook till well done
    consume partner
    Aghhh gross but a simple extreme recipe
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

  11. #51
    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
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    Cool In Dutch.

    Here's a Blog-site my wife sent me that has some dutch oven recipes for any of you that may be interested.

    http://marksblackpot.blogspot.com/
    SARGE
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  12. #52
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    Chez's Wilderness Soup

    Fresh fish (skinned, not filleted; remove head, fins and tail)
    Some potatoes (wild or otherwise) or cattail roots (boil these once before adding to soup to remove bitterness)
    Onion (wild leek or domestic), season to taste
    salt
    various herbs

    Boil a pot of water and add ingredients. Cook until potatoes are palatable (soft). Fish bones fall apart from the meat when cooked so eat everything but the very bottom pot contents. You can also use your favorite, or available, meat in place of (or in addition to) fish. I'm pretty sure most wilderness soups stem off this basic meat-starch-onion foundation. Go nuts

    Chez's Plain Baked Potato

    This works with any tubor or large root as well.

    Throw into hot coals for 20-odd minutes. Poke to see when they're done. Remove from coals, peel away skin/ash/etc and enjoy.

    Chez's Awesome Potato

    Cut a potato into 3 slices most of the way thru (widthwise). Cut an onion into 1/4" slices and then in half. Place onion slice half into each cut (only two per potato). Spread some butter on potato, wrap in tin foil, through on coals for 45 minutes to an hour.
    Last edited by MCBushbaby; 11-16-2007 at 12:50 PM.
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  13. #53

    Talking Apple-Cherry Chicken Recipe

    White Bear's Apple Cherry Chicken


    Serves 6

    Ingredients:
    6 boneless skinless chicken breasts
    1 bottle (approx. 32 oz.) Indian Summer cherry juice (100% real juice)
    1 bottle (approx. 32 oz.) Indian Summer apple juice ( " " " )
    1lb. bing cherries (sliced in half and pits removed.)
    2 medium sized Granny Smith (tart) or Northern Spy (way more tart) apples (cored and sliced into rings.)
    1 pint heavy cream or heavy whipping cream
    2-3 tbls. flour
    Canola oil
    2 Cloves of Garlic
    Sea Salt
    Pepper

    Preparing:
    In a large bowl (large enough to hold all 6 chick. breasts) place the chicken breast in bowl, cover with even amounts of apple and cherry juice and half of the sliced cherries and apple slices. Let marinade over night.

    Turn oven on to 350 degrees

    Take a skillet over medium heat. Pour enough canola oil to just cover the bottom of the pan, along with two cloves garlic, peeled and smashed . Place chicken breasts in pan, salt & pepper, and brown on both sides.

    Once browned, place chicken breasts in an oven roasting pan, add marinade juice, apples, and cherries from bowl to pan. Cover pan and put in the oven. Takes approximately 30 to 40 minutes to bake.

    Mix cream with flour (should be the consistency of a thin milkshake.)

    Once done, remove chicken breasts from pan. Take 1/2 the juice and put in sauce pan. Place pan over med. low heat. Once juice just begins to bubble, stir in cream and flour mixture. Let bubble, stirring occasionally, so sauce does not get burned or burn to the bottom of the pan. Sause will thicken to a gravy consistency.

    Place chicken breast on plate. Cover with a little of the sauce, cooked apple rings, and cherries halves.

    ENJOY!!

    This can be made in a Dutch Oven too!
    Everything I have posted is pure fantasy. I have not done any of the things that I have claimed to have done in my posts. I actually live in Detroit.

  14. #54
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    Smoked Hog and Salmon.

    Take meat, wash, salt, stick in a grill, throw alot of wet hickory on the fire, walk away for an hour.

    Hour later, return, pull meat off grill, eat.

    Just like the simple ways.

  15. #55
    a bushbaby owl_girl's Avatar
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    Default Nutritional value of mushrooms.

    Yes mushroom indeed has nutritional value (thereís a myth that they donít) Here are a couple sites I found that has some good information, I had heard that a good sized portabella potassium then a banana. Still looking for more nutritional info on morals though.
    http://www.mushrooms.ca/good/nutrition.aspx
    http://www.meadowmushrooms.co.nz/mushroomnutrition.htm

  16. #56

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    sweet... i love mushrooms in my pasta

  17. #57
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Good stuff, Owl Girl. Thank you. I retract my earlier post on the nutrition part.

    I've owned Simon and Schuster's Guide to Mushrooms since the early 80s and pick some in the wild. I don't get very adventurous and stick to the ones I'm really familiar with. The non-gilled varieties. They are excellent anyway you want to fix them. But a can't let the post go by without a note that there are MANY highly toxic mushrooms to be had and many that look very much like their edible cousins. And some that can't be identified unless the entire mushroom is present (the Amanita for one). Learn from someone that knows what they are doing if you are just starting out.

  18. #58
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    The site said virtualy no calories ,or fat or sodium how is this nutricious especialy in a survival senerio.
    KNOWLEDGE the ulitmate survival tool

    I AM HURT BUT NOT SLAIN, I WILL LIE DOWN AND BLEED A WHILE THEN I WILL RISE UP AND FIGHT AGAIN.

  19. #59
    a bushbaby owl_girl's Avatar
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    Did you even read this HOP? Its not like I said you could live off mushrooms, I simply stated they have nutritional value. Do you not call this nutrition? It takes more then fat and calories to consider something nutritious, you wouldnít call McDonald's nutritious would you? It's not healthy to live off fat and calories alone. A fat person can still be nutritionally deficient. You need to protect your immune system and organs especially in a long-term survival situation. Your body needs vitamins and minerals, which mushrooms have.

    Folate
    4% DV (16.0 mcg)
    ∑ Plays an essential role in building new body cells, by helping to make DNA and RNA.
    ∑ Works with vitamin B12 to form hemoglobin in red blood cells. Prevents megaloblastic anemia.
    ∑ The Dietary Reference Intake [DRI] for women of child-bearing age is 400 micrograms. Folate is essential for lowering the risk of neural tube defects such as spina bifida in developing fetuses.
    Niacin (Vitamin B3)
    18% DV (3.6 mg)
    ∑ Important for the metabolism of carbohydrate and fatty acids.
    ∑ Acts as a co-enzyme in many biological reduction and oxidation reactions. Required for energy metabolism.
    ∑ Helps enzymes function normally.
    Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5)
    15% DV (1.5 mg)
    ∑ Acts as a co-enzyme in fatty acid metabolism.
    ∑ Has numerous other essential roles in energy metabolism.
    Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)
    24% DV (0.4 mg)
    ∑ Required for the metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids, and supports antioxidant protection.(1)
    ∑ Changes the amino acid tryptophan in food into niacin.
    ∑ Enzyme essential to all areas of metabolism particularly that of carbohydrate and fatty acids(2).
    Thiamin (Vitamin B1)
    5% DV (0.1 mg)
    ∑ Plays essential roles in carbohydrate metabolism and neural function.(3)
    Vitamin B6
    5% DV (0.1 mg)
    ∑ Primarily involved in metabolism of amino acids.
    ∑ Helps produce other body chemicals including insulin, hemoglobin and antibodies that fight infection.
    Copper
    16% DV (0.3 mg)
    ∑ Found in all body tissues, with the bulk in the liver, brain, heart and kidney.
    ∑ An essential micronutrient that plays a role in making hemoglobin.
    ∑ Also involved in energy production.
    Iron
    3% DV (0.5 mg)
    ∑ A component of hemoglobin and myoglobin and is important in oxygen transfer.
    ∑ A component of numerous enzymes.
    ∑ About 70% is found in hemoglobin, about 25% is stored in liver, spleen and bone.
    Magnesium
    2% DV (9.0 mg)
    ∑ Macronutrient with 50% found in bone and the other 50% almost entirely inside body cells.
    ∑ Serves as an important part of more than 300 enzymes responsible for regulating many body functions including energy production, making body protein and muscle contraction.
    ∑ Also helps maintain nerve and muscle cells.
    Phosphorus
    9% DV (86.0 mg)
    ∑ A component of every cell and other important compounds including DNA and RNA which are responsible for cell growth and repair.
    ∑ Part of phospholipids present in every cell membrane in the body.
    ∑ Is a major component of bones and teeth.
    ∑ Important for pH regulation.
    Potassium
    9% DV (318 mg)
    ∑ Helps regulate fluids and mineral balance in and out of body cells.
    ∑ Helps maintain blood pressure.
    ∑ Important for muscle contraction and transmission of nerve impulses.
    Selenium
    13% DV (9.3 mcg)
    ∑ Is involved in fat metabolism.
    ∑ Acts as an antioxidant with vitamin E.
    Zinc
    3% DV (0.5 mg)
    ∑ Helps the body use carbohydrate, protein and fat.
    ∑ A constituent of many enzymes and insulin.
    ∑ Promotes cell reproduction, tissue growth and repair. Adequate zinc intake is essential for growth.
    ∑ Involved in immune function.
    ∑ Also plays many important structural roles as components of proteins.
    Last edited by owl_girl; 11-24-2007 at 05:58 PM.

  20. #60
    Super-duper Moderator Sarge47's Avatar
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    Talking Hmmmm.....

    Quote Originally Posted by owl_girl View Post
    Yes mushroom indeed has nutritional value (thereís a myth that they donít) Here are a couple sites I found that has some good information, I had heard that a good sized portabella potassium then a banana. Still looking for more nutritional info on morals though.
    http://www.mushrooms.ca/good/nutrition.aspx
    http://www.meadowmushrooms.co.nz/mushroomnutrition.htm
    Dunno if Morels have a lot of nutrician but if I ran across a bunch of them while out in the woods....YUMMIE!!!
    SARGE
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."
    Albert Einstein

    Proud father of a US Marine....SEMPER FI!

    They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    Benjamin Franklin

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