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Thread: Crawfish

  1. #1
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    Default Crawfish

    anyone ever eat wild crawfish? what part of a Crawfish is edible?


  2. #2

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    They're basically freshwater lobsters, so any part of a lobster you can eat would be edible. The most meat will be in the tail.

  3. #3

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    I never even thought about being able to eat crawfish before. We go out to try and catch them in the river. But this is a great thing to remember if you ever did find yourself in an emergency by a river and needed food.

  4. #4

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    I love the taste of crawfish, as long as it is in a prepared dish. It takes too long to pick out the good meat since they are so small.

  5. #5

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    I'm not much in to fish and seafood, but my husband absolutely loves a good mess of crawfish! My understanding is the same, if you can eat it on a lobster, you can eat it on a crawfish. You just have to be prepared because they're so much smaller.

  6. #6
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    I would compare crayfish more to shrimp. People used to eating unpeeled shrimp don't seen to mind like work. I seen plate fulls of these critters dissapper quick. Crayfish are scavagers boil them and the shell will turn lite red when there done. Meat should be white when done. I really don't think they have much flavor so putting something in the water for seasoning would be nice if giving the chance.

  7. #7

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    I have also heard that crayfish are very good. Actually, I have a couple of recipes for them in my wild game cookbook. Never actually had any myself but I've always wanted to try 'em.

  8. #8

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    I actually looked up on the internet for some receipes using crawfish out of curiousity the other day when I first seen this thread. There are a ton of receipes out there. I will have to try them sometime.

  9. #9
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    Mudbugs (crawfish) are very high in protien & the shells are also high in calcium, both important in survival mode.

    So are any wild bird eggs you come across...but try to cook those if you can, to reduce any chance of salmonella...but if not, they can be eaten raw with minimal risk.

    Mudbugs are easy and safe to catch...as they typically hide in holes along mud banks at or near the waterline when resting...though be warned they back into their holes with claws out!

    A small sturdy stick will usually pull them out, especially if you wrap a little piece of pantyhose on the end of it to catch on their spines and claws!

    Pantyhose is like duct tape, flint, leatherman and paracord...don't leave home without it! A few pairs of pantyhose are essential survival gear...the bigger the better...and I like natural as it tends to camouflage better for the uses below.

    They are super lightweight and compress well into any nook or cranny...they can also be spread across two sticks as netting to catch frogs, snakes, turtles, mudbugs or even small minnows near shore...can strain mucky water, or be used to squeeze water from moss...will carry almost anything...tie almost anything...act as bandages, tourniquets or splints...are good bug netting for your face or arms...will keep you warm under your fleece or pants...and if you are really good, even snare a bird or rodent!

    Boiling mudbugs is the best preparation if you have a heat source and something to cook in...an old hubcap, tin can, or even steamed in tin foil or bark/leaves using hot rocks...and you can eat all of the mudbug if you want.

    In a survival situation they can be eaten raw, but the tail and claw meat is tough and chewy...with the front half gooey in parts...but then I did say survival!

    If you want to practice catching, cooking & eating them...I would suggest that you find a good, clean river or stream...since they are like river filters, and tend to concentrate mercury and other nasty toxins in their systems.

    Most commercial mudbugs are farm-raised like catfish...using a clean water source and being fed commercial food...which gives them a good mild flavor too!

  10. #10

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    easy to catch i think but not much meat

  11. #11
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    ive eatin em caught out of the river boild in a beer can. half water half beer. it was good but i was also drinkin. we ate the tail with shell on ,definatiy a good survival food
    leave it like you found

  12. #12
    Senior Member LarryB's Avatar
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    Cool Mmmmm! :-)

    This Canuck loves Crawdaddys. Catch 'em from clean waters and boil 'em up just like little mini-lobsters. Eat 'em just like fresh Shrimp, with lemon butter, seafood sauce or with a dash of yer favorite Hot Sauce! Mmmmm.

    The Wild Kanuck,

    lb

  13. #13

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    I've never actaully tried Crawfish, but I'd like to soon. I know how to catch, cook them, and spice them,, so I don't knwo what I'm waiting for. Anyone ever tried frog legs, my pops siad they taste liek chicken but I've never treid them hyet. I want to try that soon too.

  14. #14
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    Frog legs, rabbit and even gator tail pretty much taste like chicken because that's what most of us are used to eating, and so we reference it, instead of saying "chicken tastes like rabbit!"

    Any good southern buffet will have frog legs, crawfish and gator tail on the menu at some point during the week...the crawfish are usually steamed whole...but if they are just tails they will be usually be battered and deep fried just like the gator tail and frog legs.

    The finer coon-*** restaurants (lol) like Copeland's will use crawfish in season for ettouffee, bisque, gumbo and jambalaya too...man is that ever tasty...and a bunch of southern sandwich shops will have fried crawfish subs too!

    A little Louisiana hot-sauce really perks up any of that kind of food...but I personally find frog legs are more trouble than they are worth...kind of like chicken wings.

  15. #15
    Senior Member marberry's Avatar
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    when i catch a crawfish i open up the tail and eat it using my knife as a substitute fork lol , boil em beforehand though.

  16. #16
    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    good author on this euell gibbons

  17. #17

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    Great survival food.

    They're not just in the south, these guys are from Flaming Gorge, a 90 mile long lake straddling the Utah/Wyoming border, so these are northern dads, with good size and flavor.

    My quickie trail sauce for dipping is a mix of packets of honey and lemon juice, with butter buds/packets and a dash of cayenne.

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    Last edited by donny h; 07-25-2007 at 11:26 PM.

  18. #18
    A Laughing Wolf spiritman's Avatar
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    Lobster sized! GO MIDWEST USA! Everything is bigger! The mountains, the SKY, the states, even crustaceans!

  19. #19

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    I'm from New Orleans so naturally I love crawfish. Boil them up with some seasoning, peal the tails and if you wish SUCK THE HEADS! But I've always bought them from a store and boiled them. I've never caught them in the wild and ate them
    Survival Skill - Personal Outdoors Survival Blog and Resources
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  20. #20
    A Laughing Wolf spiritman's Avatar
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    I've never realized I ever saw them in a store before, I never thought of them as a normal option as a meal, but we have caught them for fishing (be careful and know the laws where you go, live and/or natural bait isn't always legal) and fun before.

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