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Thread: " in the bush " natural condiments/spices/oils

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    hunter-gatherer Canadian-guerilla's Avatar
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    Default " in the bush " natural condiments/spices/oils

    ok, so we're in the bush, and we have no store-bought ketchup, mustard, or cooking oils

    lets have some " natural/in the bush " ideas FOR EXTRA FLAVOR

    wild onions/garlic
    chives

    any ideas for natural cooking oils from plants ( non animal )


    no frying pans here, cooking pot will be a can over an open fire/hobo stove
    a bicycle spoke was used for the hanger

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    there are two types of wild food enthusiasts,
    one picks for enjoyment of adding something to a meal,
    and the second is the person who lives mostly on ( wild ) edibles

    Lydia


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    naturalist primitive your_comforting_company's Avatar
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    Modern mustard is made from the crushed seeds of Brassica nigra. I like to munch the immature seedpods while the seeds are still green and juicy. Of course modern stuff has a lot of additives, but there's no mistaking the taste of the seedpods.

    There are lots of wild pepper plants, like birds-eye, poor-man's pepper, and the Brassicaceae family plant "pepperweed". Brassica rapa(field mustard) and Raphanus raphanistrum (wild radish) seeds are also very spicy.

    Salt substitutes can be made by burning the bark of some trees. The actual tree that Native Americans used is still unclear to me, but I'm looking for information on it and will share when I find out. Blood also contains a lot of salt.

    Cooking oils will most easily be procured from animal fats. I dont' know of any plants that provide oil other than a few beans, and coconuts.
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  3. #3
    "sorry backside" rebel's Avatar
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    Corn oil, sunflower oil, soybean. I don't know how it would be extracted.

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    California bay leaves were very often used to spice and flavor all kinds of food, although that probably doesent help you guys too much.

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    Quality Control Director Ken's Avatar
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    Default Juniper Berries

    You can get oil from Juniper Berries. I'm not too sure how well it would work for frying, but I've used crushed wild Junipers to make homemade duck pastrami. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/e...ipe/index.html

    Juniper Berries are used to produce "a volatile oil which is a prime ingredient in Geneva or Hollands Gin, upon which its flavour and diuretic properties depend." http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/j/junipe11.html

    "Juniper berries are also used as the primary flavor in the liquor Jenever and sahti-style of beers. Juniper berry sauce is often a popular flavoring choice for quail, pheasant, veal, rabbit, venison, and other meat dishes." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juniper


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    Quality Control Director Ken's Avatar
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    Default Teosinte

    I don't remember seeing any posts about Teosinte Grass here.

    Teosinte is a wild grass that, almost 10,000 years ago, gave birth to a hybridized grain we are now much more familiar with - corn. In fact' it's most often referred to as "wild corn." It grows wild in Mexico and Central America, and has been cultivated in the United States (including Florida) as well. http://www.gardenguides.com/taxonomy...-zea-mexicana/.

    Although somewhat uncommon, teosinte may be found today growing wild in the southwest United States.

    http://inclusivebusiness.typepad.com...e-to-corn.html

    It has most of the properties of corn, and can be used to produce a variety of corn oil.

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    http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...26tbs%3Disch:1
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    Quality Control Director Ken's Avatar
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    Default Asparagus

    The last one I can come up with at the moment is - Asparagus.

    I can't find a source right yet, but oil can be extracted from asparagus.
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    Quality Control Director Ken's Avatar
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    Default Nuts!

    Oh yeah, I'm forgetting the obvious. Nuts are a great source of oil as well. Oil can be derived from pretty much any variety of nut.
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    Quality Control Director Ken's Avatar
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    Quality Control Director Ken's Avatar
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    Default And then there are Citrus Oils....

    ".........it takes 220 oranges, 330 lemons, or 400 limes to make 5 ounces of oil. The good news is that those fruits have not given their lives in vain — a little citrus oil goes a long way."

    http://www.ochef.com/1002.htm
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    Quality Control Director Ken's Avatar
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    Default Extracting Oil

    "When oil is made, the nuts, seeds, or fruits being used to make the oil are first ground into an even paste. The paste goes through a malaxation process, a slow stirring which encourages the oil in the paste to clump. To extract the oil, pressure is applied, forcing the oil out of the paste. Heating the paste will increase the yield of oil. Some producers mix the paste with warm water, or heat it before pressing. Others make cold pressed oil by using an oil stone alone to remove the oil. After the oil has been produced, it is graded and bottled."

    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-cold-pressed-oil.htm
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    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken View Post
    You can get oil from Juniper Berries. I'm not too sure how well it would work for frying, but I've used crushed wild Junipers to make homemade duck pastrami. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/e...ipe/index.html

    Juniper Berries are used to produce "a volatile oil which is a prime ingredient in Geneva or Hollands Gin, upon which its flavour and diuretic properties depend." http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/j/junipe11.html

    "Juniper berries are also used as the primary flavor in the liquor Jenever and sahti-style of beers. Juniper berry sauce is often a popular flavoring choice for quail, pheasant, veal, rabbit, venison, and other meat dishes." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juniper


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    Ken?? Is this why you quit posting about the GF's ducks????
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    Quality Control Director Ken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nell67 View Post
    Ken?? Is this why you quit posting about the GF's ducks????
    Uhhh, no. They're getting REAL BIG, but not enough meat on them bones - yet.

    Those things grow faster than weeds. I'll shoot an updated pic and post it as an attachment (STILL CAN'T POST THE BIG PICS) later on.
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    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    Anything in the mint family will add flavor. Beebalm leaves and, of course, wild honey.

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    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
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    I want salt.

    Fortunately we have an abundance of salt licks in my area.

    I shall sit and boil salt in my small tin can, ambushing small and large animals as they come to the lick. Oil should drip out of something sooner or latter.

    Our primitive ancestors depended more on animal fats than vegatible oils. Rendered bear grease was a barter item on the frontier. I never remember reading too much historical info on pressing olive oil among the NA tribes.

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    hunter-gatherer Canadian-guerilla's Avatar
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    good stuff here
    of the above mentioned, the most readily available ( to me ) is Juniper berries

    been looking into tapping trees for their sap(s)

    maple sap as a cooking/boiling addition ?
    .
    Knowledge without experience is just information


    there are two types of wild food enthusiasts,
    one picks for enjoyment of adding something to a meal,
    and the second is the person who lives mostly on ( wild ) edibles

    Lydia

  17. #17
    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    angelica,anise hyssop,apple,arugula,basil,bee balm,borage,burnet,calendula,carnation,chamomile, chicory,chives,chrsysanthemum,clover,coriander,cor nflower,dandelion,day lily,dill,english daisy,fennel,fuschia,gardenia,gladiolus,hibiscus,h ollyhock,honeysuckle,hyssop,impatiens,jasmine,john ny-jump-up,lavender,lemon blossom,lemon verbena,lilac,mallow,marigold,marjoram,mint,nastur ium,okra,pansy,pea,pineapple guava,pineapple sage,primerose,radish,redbud,rose,rosemary,runner bean,safflower,scented geranium,snapdragon,society garlic,squash blossom,sunflower,thyme,tuberous begonia,violet,yucca
    Last edited by wareagle69; 05-08-2010 at 08:04 AM.
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    hunter-gatherer Canadian-guerilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wareagle69 View Post
    angelica,anise hyssop,apple,arugula,basil,bee balm,borage,burnet,calendula,carnation,chamomile, chicory,chives,chrsysanthemum,clover,coriander,cor nflower,dandelion,day lily,dill,english daisy,fennel,fuschia,gardenia,gladiolus,hibiscus,h ollyhock,honeysuckle,hyssop,impatiens,jasmine,john ny-jump-up,lavender,lemon blossom,lemon verbena,lilac,mallow,marigold,marjoram,mint,nastur ium,okra,pansy,pea,pineapple guava,pineapple sage,primerose,radish,redbud,rose,rosemary,runner bean,safflower,scented geranium,snapdragon,society garlic,squash blossom,sunflower,thyme,tuberous begonia,violet,yucca

    good stuff WE

    going to print these out and check'em out

    lot of flowers here, i think we need a " edible flowers " thread
    .
    Knowledge without experience is just information


    there are two types of wild food enthusiasts,
    one picks for enjoyment of adding something to a meal,
    and the second is the person who lives mostly on ( wild ) edibles

    Lydia

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    Senior Member wareagle69's Avatar
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    funny you should say that...
    always be prepared-prepare all ways
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  20. #20
    Senior Member gryffynklm's Avatar
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    Nice list WE.

    Spice Bush (Lindera Benzoin)

    I have used spice bush twigs as a seasoning in venison, chicken and fish. Its not bad in a tea. It has a light citrus fragrance and tastes a bit like allspice. The venison and the chicken were studded with twigs like you would stud a ham with cloves. The twigs were soaked in water about an hour before I studded the meat. The fish was steamed on a bed of leaves. The twigs leaves and the seeds are all edible. It also has medicinal uses. This is an East Coast plant We have a lot in Randolph County, WV.

    http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Pla...Spicebush.html
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