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Thread: How Surival Turns Deadly - It's Not a Game.

  1. #121

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    Quote Originally Posted by wareagle69 View Post
    well here i go again
    this is not going to be a popular response
    i know gino and les and yes they are the real deal and give great advice, but 10 courses before going solo, and sarge with his thread with what 18 or 20 questions of what you must have before going in the bush, hogwash allot of responses and threads here make me ask the same question i have before, how many of you actually get out and spend many nights a year in the bush, i have said before i spend well over 90 nights out at least, have i taken formal training, yes but only recently, from allen most of what i have done has been solo treks into the wilds of the mountains, canyons, deserts, freezing cold and so on, most times i had only my simple pack in the truck when i would get hit with the desire to head out.
    obviously he made a mistake, and i'll go out and say definetly that it was hypothermia, this weekend sucked, windy and cool then no wind and warm i broke a sweat a few times. but i understand all your stances on being prepared, its actually my motto, but for crying out loud when someone says they are going camping they get hammered(yup theres that word again sarge) on what they are doing, i will say to most of you get off the computer spend some time in the out doors remember what its like to be in touch with nature.
    now this feller did allot of things right as justincase already outlined, this crap that people write about don't go in the bush unless you have wally world in your back pocket, is insane, same as when i go out for a walk in the bush and people say"but theres bears out there" yup there sure is and i've seen most of then hauling arse away from me, only one of them has confronted me so far, bear attacks are rare, i am and remain adament about posting about what you know and to also learn what you can, if you are going to post about bears or hypothermia you better have your ducks in a row cuz i will call BS when i see it.
    WE
    Lol, You sound like my father I grew up listening to his mountain man stuff. He's had more than bears meet him, face to face, at the top of a ridge though, and all of them ran (including him). He always told me, if a bear attacks, for some reason, "play dead and let them bat you around". If they think you are not a threat, they will leave you alone. The one that attack are usually mothers anyway so, I get that. And as for hypothermia, my dad said it's better to be naked and dry than layered with sweat ...


  2. #122
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
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    Came across a Quote from the Movie, The Outlaw Josey Wales.
    Has some value in survival,
    "Now remember, when things look bad and it looks like you're not gonna make it, then you gotta get mean. I mean plumb, mad-dog mean. 'Cause if you lose your head and you give up then you neither live nor win. That's just the way it is."
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
    Member Wahoo Killer knives club....#27

  3. #123

    Default The Official Survival Color

    Quote Originally Posted by kyratshooter View Post

    Is the umbrella camo? How about orange? Which is the official "survival color"?
    I didnít see an answer to Kyratshooterís question, but the recent discussion about camo painting everything from boats to significant others made me think about it. I wonder what you all think about this question. For myself, when I am hunting it is camo (with the regulation amount of hunter orange if applicable). When I am hiking/climbing I favor reds, oranges, and yellows (including the tent, backpack, etc.)

    My preference for bright colors comes from experiences looking for missing hikers and climbers. Bright colors make a big difference in spotting them from the ground or the air as compared to dark colors and camo. As an example, a fallen climber lying on a glacier snowfield who is wearing dark brown, black, grey, dark green, etc., looks like a rock outcrop. OTOH someone who is wearing red, orange, or yellow, stands out (reverse pun not intended) very clearly even if they are not moving at all. In the jungle or dense forest or desert, white stands out best to my eyes. When time is of the essence, I hope that the person we are looking for is wearing bright colors.

    Maybe it all boils down to what you envision as your personal survival scenario. In the ones I picture myself being in, I would want to be found as quickly as possible.

    Anyway. My vote for the official wilderness survival color is Orange. (Iíll try not to get lost during Fall when the aspens are turning.) Any other votes?

  4. #124
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
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    I think bright colors are important. The rain cover on my newer pack is orange so I can stand out if I need to but I don't have to stand out all the time.

  5. #125
    Junior Member Tokwan's Avatar
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    I think there is no official color as I see lots of safety vests using orange, yellow or luminous green. To me a survival color should be bright, so that you are easily seen. Its regardless if you are in orange, yellow, red, luminous green or white or even aluminum...as long as you stand out in contrast to the backgrounds, you should be able to be seen.
    I'm a Gramp who is not computer savvy, give me a slab and the rock ages tablet..I will do fine!

  6. #126

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    Quote Originally Posted by crashdive123 View Post
    We tell every numpty this every time. Then we get flamed. Then they vow to never come to this forum again. A numpty won't read a sticky - they want instant gratification, and they want it their way. Any advice to the contrary means we're just a bunch of old F.A.R.T.S. that don't understand.
    Well said.

    Dipsh1ts never want to listen to the Old farts. :-) The intelligent, serious, smart young (and older who should allready know) people book survival courses, then leanr how ignorant they REALLY are.

  7. #127

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  8. #128

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    I agree that you need info, a mentor, and practice to go do "survival" camping.

    Been there, done that.

  9. #129

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    We get all sorts of people, who have all sorts of outdoor pursuits coming on the course. A very small amount would be the typical doomsday "Survivalists" type, who think that camping out with cammo gear and carving wooden spoons is 'survival'. :-)

    Bushwalkers, Defense Personell, Paragliders, Kayakers, Climbers, Teachers, 4WD enthusiasts, Ultra Marathon runners, Bush Fire Fighters, Cross Country motorcyclists, Snowboarders etc etc

    Australia is such a vast country, with so many outdoor pursuits available, that most clients simply want to learn proper survival skills (self rescue), not camping skills. :-)

  10. #130
    Grubbin fer food Durtyoleman's Avatar
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    Years ago I planned to hike the Florida trail from end to end then I had an accident that put me out of work for an extended period of time and during that period of constant doctor visits etc I was informed of many other health issues that made me realize that I was not likely ever to make that trip as I had envisioned it. I would never recommend someone without formal training do such a foolhardy venture as trying to survive alone with nothing in freezing weather but my shift in life circumstances has made me appreciate the value and thrill of the risk taking and adventures I had as a young man. So I say to the young ones that by all means they should plan, prepare, let others know where and what they have in mind and where they are going, invite a friend or three to accompany them, and bring the best they have when they try to rely on the least. While some tightrope walkers work without a net after many years of practice only fools try to walk a rope across a gorge without training and fail safes. But by no means does that mean the goals and adventure are unattainable and having a radio and cell phone to call for help does not make the adventure less than it is. There is risk every time we cross a street but that does not mean we should stay indoors nor does it mean we should wrap a blindfold over our eyes and run pell mell into the interstate. Get out and do the things you want to while you are able but by all means be prepared. I may still do that Florida trail but now it will be in short trips and with a mobility scooter...lol
    The object of life is to live and enjoy what time we have...But LIVE is the operative term.

    D.O.M.

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