Page 24 of 24 FirstFirst ... 14222324
Results 461 to 480 of 480

Thread: Multi-use items!

  1. #461

    Default

    A slightly curved and shaped ash sapling roughly one inch in diameter tapering to roughly 3/4 inch at the tapered end which is shaped like the hull of a cigar boat. By casual observation a simple "stick".

    -Bow for Friction Fire
    -Atl all dart launcher
    -Digging Stick for food and water
    -Navigation Aid
    -Tracking Tool
    - Hide ringing tool for the tanning process
    -Tool for sharing eight angles of traditional knife and stick fighting methods
    -Pointer
    -Fire poker


  2. #462
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    56,635

    Default

    If it's 10 foot long then it's that stick most women wouldn't use to touch me.

  3. #463
    Senior Member BENESSE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Gotham
    Posts
    9,484

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    If it's 10 foot long then it's that stick most women wouldn't use to touch me.
    That's because we've learned a frying pan is much more effective.

  4. #464
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    KY bluegrass region-the center of the universe
    Posts
    9,759

    Default

    Yep that frying pan will fry, sauté, boil, bake and act as a self defense tool.

    I can see Rick with LODGE impressed across his forehead!
    If you didn't bring jerky what did I just eat?

  5. #465
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    56,635

    Default

    On my toes, too. Never drop one. Just sayin'.

  6. #466
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Stephenville TX
    Posts
    209

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarge47 View Post
    15.) Expedient weapon. (not sure who posted that one.)
    When I lived in Dallas, several of us that lived ~250 yards from Albertson's would walk instead of drive, because driving you had to go a mile the wrong way to get to the turnaround lane, whereas walking you could just go straight there. We would often shop at night, and the general practice for passing the corner of a shady neighborhood that abutted ours was to have one bag with just one canned item in it, carried in the dominant hand. One of the girls actually had occasion to use that single-use flail on some punk, and it was devastating.

  7. #467
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    56,635

    Default

    Just don't try that carrying sponges. Just sayin'...

  8. #468
    Senior Member BENESSE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Gotham
    Posts
    9,484

    Default

    Carrying a lot of change in a sock works just as well.

  9. #469
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Stephenville TX
    Posts
    209

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BENESSE View Post
    Carrying a lot of change in a sock works just as well.
    More likely to be seen as a weapon. A can of pork and beans in a grocery bag is just plain old groceries.

    Besides, there's got to be some extra shaming available for a guy who gets his clock cleaned with ten ounces of sweet peas.

  10. #470
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Stephenville TX
    Posts
    209

    Default

    https://www.amazon.com/Shark-Stainle...dp/B003BRQ36O/

    I prefer Derby blades for actual shaving, but I ended up with most of a box of Sharks that I didn't want to just throw out. They're individually paper-wrapped, tiny enough to fit anywhere, and wedged into a slotted stick, make a sharper knife than you're going to be able to come up with almost any other way. Break one in half and you can make a serious broadhead. A couple dozen of them take up less space in the kit than a matchbook, so you'd have a good supply of spares, too.

    Another option would be a scalpel handle and a big pack of blades; usually for a few bucks on eBay or Amazon you can get a #3 handle and 50+ blades. #15C blades are my personal preference for cutting out splinters or lancing anything, though a variety might be best. #40 is pretty much a ready made small arrowhead, and 23, 24 or 25 would make a good drill point.

  11. #471
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    SE/SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    26,866

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BENESSE View Post
    Carrying a lot of change in a sock works just as well.
    That's a flashback for me......Guy paid for his paper with change from a sock, when I was a kid paperboy.....LOL

    Later, a cartoon in our local paper called "Crankshaft"....old guy did the same thing with a sock full of pennies.
    Often wondered if that writer was in my head....lot's of parallels.

    Purses can be lethal as well.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
    Member Wahoo Killer knives club....#27

  12. #472

    Default

    Amazing, these (some of these) will be with me on my next adventure!
    In case no one mentioned this for duct tape (I'm sure someone has)... it has saved me couple times from getting super blistered in longer-than-expected walks. Once I feel any warm spots on my feet, I just tape the area and it keep going. No blisters, happy feet.
    Thanks

  13. #473

    Default

    Duct tape, especially for the Alone show. Then the gaiters that are just sitting in the corner can be used to carry a couple of gallons of water, and take only 10 minutes each to arrange (to include carrying strap). Instead of taking all day to whittle a wooden bottle that holds one cup of water). :-) Rain pants can hold a lot more water, just tie off the top and bottom of each leg. Your legs get wet anyway, so the pants might as well be utilized for something else that's of value.

  14. #474
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Near Lincoln, Montana
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Ironically, I just wrote an article about this topic. Everything I listed has been listed here except flammable snack chips such as fritos and doritos which are great for getting a fire started quickly, even in wet conditions, and paper towels for TP, wound dressing, filtering sediment from water, note paper, etc. I also prefer smaller diameter and tensile strength paracord than 550. 550 is more bulky than most survival situations call for. In my opinion, 325 paracord is the best choice. It has a tensile strength of 325 lbs and a diameter of 2mm - half the bulk as 550. 50 is 4mm dia. with a tensile strength of 550lbs. If a situation does happen to require heavier cord than 325, simply use multiple lengths. I also would ommit the trash bags. I have multiple sized ziplocs, a sheet of 6-mil black plastic and a space blanket - don't need a trash bag.

  15. #475
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    KY bluegrass region-the center of the universe
    Posts
    9,759

    Default

    Nope, take the garbage bag too. They have too many uses to leave behind, especially when paired with the also mentioned duct tape.

    I use the 4 mil, 40 gallon contractors bags and have changed all my emergency tape supplies to Gorilla tape.

  16. #476

    Default

    I don't use paracord much,either. I like #36 or heavier bank line.
    Wilderness Survival:
    Surviving a temporary situation where you're lost in the wilderness

  17. #477

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shane Montana View Post
    Ironically, I just wrote an article about this topic. Everything I listed has been listed here except flammable snack chips such as fritos and doritos which are great for getting a fire started quickly, even in wet conditions, and paper towels for TP, wound dressing, filtering sediment from water, note paper, etc. I also prefer smaller diameter and tensile strength paracord than 550. 550 is more bulky than most survival situations call for. In my opinion, 325 paracord is the best choice. It has a tensile strength of 325 lbs and a diameter of 2mm - half the bulk as 550. 50 is 4mm dia. with a tensile strength of 550lbs. If a situation does happen to require heavier cord than 325, simply use multiple lengths. I also would ommit the trash bags. I have multiple sized ziplocs, a sheet of 6-mil black plastic and a space blanket - don't need a trash bag.
    How's Hannah?

    I'm sorry. I just couldn't help it.
    "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." Jim Kirk

  18. #478
    Senior Member kyratshooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    KY bluegrass region-the center of the universe
    Posts
    9,759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pete lynch View Post
    I don't use paracord much,either. I like #36 or heavier bank line.
    I have changed my preferences to use of a lot of bank line also. It is cheaper and easier to obtain than 550 cord.

    Just the other day I was thinking back to my days when survival could be doubtful and it occurred to me that we did not have a lot of paracord floating around and no one was carrying spools or hanks of rolled up 550 cord.

    What we used were boot laces for our combat boots. Everyone had a spare set of those, and they were over 6 feet long.

    We also had communications wire. Steel and copper threads of wire running inside a plastic cover and it was used for everything that 550 cord is now used for. Besides operating the telephones it was used to lash poles for frameworks, hang hammocks, tie people up, set off explosives and all manner of things 550 cord can not even dream of doing. I once saw an improvised fan belt on a vehicle made from como-wire. I have also seen it used to replace those combat boot laces so the real laces could be used for something else. Everybody carried a small roll of como-wire in their gear much like we carry bank line or 550 cord today. I found out that como-wire was what held the infantry together and had done so since WW1 when it was invented.

    Come to think about it, I had never seen a piece of 550 cord until I was in the military. I had grown up in the woods without the stuff. Of course I had never seen como-wire used as we used it either.

    Until I was in my 20s lashings needed for roaming the woods and fields and fishing included only heavy cotton twine, various weights of fishing line and whatever light rope one could find, which was often packaged and marketed as clothesline rope!

    We also had bailing twine. Miles and miles of bailing twine. I have a roll in the shed outside right now. It will do most of what 550 cord will do, although it is not as durable, and costs $10 for a mile of the stuff.
    Last edited by kyratshooter; 05-02-2018 at 12:23 PM.

  19. #479
    Junior Member Steven1919's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    California, LA
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Alcohol
    Trash holders
    Shaving foam

  20. #480
    Junior Member davidradio's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    1948 College Avenue Dayton
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Look forward to it. Thanks. Or maybe a blog entry.
    The Jeep is the only true American sports car.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •