Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 47

Thread: Been Using This Stuff For Years. . . .

  1. #1

    Thumbs up Been Using This Stuff For Years. . . .

    A friend of mine sent this article to me, do I thought I'd share it with all of you.

    I've been using this stuff for better than 20 years. It is the best ointment available, bar NONE!

    Since I walk barefoot 95% of the time, I use it when I get cracks on my feet. It heals them overnight. . .seriously! I also use on my hands, and if it is really cold and windy I put it on my lips before I go out to cut woods, haul water, etc. Best lip protection EVER!

    So, whom else uses it, and what for?

    Guests can not see images in the messages. Please register in the forum.

    "By JOHN CURRAN, Associated Press Writer – Sun Jan 31

    LYNDONVILLE, Vt. – Winter is most definitely here. It must be. The phones are ringing at Bag Balm headquarters.

    Everyone wants a new tub of the gooey, yellow-green ointment. And all have a story about its problem-salving — they use it on squeaky bed springs, psoriasis, dry facial skin, cracked fingers, burns, zits, diaper rash, saddle sores, sunburn, pruned trees, rifles, shell casings, bed sores and radiation burns.

    Everything, it seems, except for cows.

    "Some, you don't really even want to hear, but they're gonna tell you anyway," said accounts manager Krystina McMorrow, who is half the office staff.

    "I've been here 14 years," said accounts-receivable clerk Shawna Wilkerson, the other half. "The oddest one I've heard was somebody who reloads his ammunition. He puts Bag Balm on the bullet casing and it makes it easier to reload 'em."

    Developed in 1899 to soothe the irritated udders of milking cows, the substance with the mild medicinal odor has evolved into a medicine chest must-have, with as many uses as Elmer's glue.

    According to Bag Balm lore, the stuff went from barns to bedrooms when dairy farmers' wives noticed how smooth their spouses' fingers were after using it on cows' udders. The wives were jealous.

    Bag Balm went to the North Pole with Admiral Byrd, to Allied troops in World War II, who used it to keep weapons from corroding, to Ground Zero for the paws of cadaver-sniffing dogs searching the World Trade Center rubble, and to troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Sold off pet care shelves and at farm stores for $8.99 per 10-oz. green tub (with cow's head on the lid), it's made of petrolatum, lanolin and an antiseptic, 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate — substantially the same formula used since John L. Norris bought it from a Wells River druggist before the turn of the century.

    It is made in a one-room "plant" by the family owned Dairy Association Co., Inc. — six employees, two officers and no sales force — operating in a cluster of converted railroad buildings in this small (pop. 1,215) northern Vermont town.

    Petrolatum is shoveled from 50-gallon drums into a large vat and blended with lanolin from Uruguay, then heated to 95 degrees. A machine quickly squirts the goop into metal cans that are cooled, capped and packaged.

    The plant is inspected annually by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, though the product is marketed for use by animals, not humans.

    Distributed by wholesalers and sold retail in farm stores, national drugstore chains and general stores, its popularity has grown largely with word-of-mouth advertising as converts becomes users and then devotees.

    Imitators through the years have included Udderly Smooth Udder Cream and Udder Balm.

    The Dairy Association won't divulge sales figures.

    In a 1983 report, the late CBS News journalist Charles Kuralt said upward of 400,000 units were shipped annually. Norris' granddaughter, company President Barbara Norris Allen, won't say how today's shipments compare.

    "The colder the weather, the better our business," said Ron Bean, production manager at the plant, which is open for tours but not photographers.

    To call the operation old-fashioned is an understatement.

    The plant operates with one shift, Monday through Friday. The Dairy Association doesn't take credit cards ("Send us a good ol' check," says Allen). And the names of individual stores that buy directly are kept on index cards in file cabinets.

    Long-distance bicyclist Andy Claflin says he started using Bag Balm on a cross-country race last June, when a teammate turned him on to it for saddle sores.

    Claflin, 37, from Dayton, Minn., was suffering from saddle sores as he competed in the Race Across America. A teammate told him it was good for the sores, a bane of long-distance biking. So he slathered some on, down below.

    "I was sitting there in Arizona, it's 110 degrees, the air conditioning wasn't working, the crapper in the RV wasn't working, I gotta' bike 100 miles in this heat and great, I've got to deal with this," he said. "It was nasty and filthy and it felt weird ... But I didn't have saddle sores from then on, riding 130 miles a day. When you're on the bike, you're like 'Oh, this stuff is great.'"

    Marge Boyle, 62, a quilter in Paducah, Ky., keeps a tin by her sewing machine.

    "It's really a wonderful product when you're sewing, because of all the pinpricks you get. It soothes and heals your fingers. Quilters are always pricking their fingers. We wash our hands constantly to keep them free of dirt, and you need something to soothe them," she said.

    And it's still de rigeur in barns, where it all started.

    Dairy farmer Willie Ryan has used it since the '70s, to soothe the chapped teats of cows. And more.

    "The cows get frostbit sometime, so we use the Bag Balm," said Ryan, 60, of Craftsbury, Vt. "Any open wound with swelling, you just put some of that in and put a pack bandage on it and it does wonders. Don't ask me how, but it does," he said.

    For all its myriad uses, there's one place its makers say never to use it.

    "Never put Bag Balm in your hair, because you will not get it out," said Wilkerson."
    Everything I have posted is pure fantasy. I have not done any of the things that I have claimed to have done in my posts. I actually live in Detroit.


  2. #2
    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    7,577

    Default

    I use it for it's intended purpose, on goats,and use it for my hands and feet,it really does work well.

    The company I work for sells it for $5.99 not the $8.99 the story has listed.
    Soular powered by the son.

    Nell, MLT (ASCP)

  3. #3
    Senior Member aflineman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    851

    Default

    I use Bag Balm and Corn Huskers Lotion on my hands, feet, and joints. The combination is of the few things that help with my dry elbows.
    I have used Bag Balm for it's intended use, and on myself, family, and animals. It is one of the few balms that I can put on my dogs' sores and they won't lick it off. It really does close up cracks in dry skin, overnight.
    Have Lights? Thank a Lineman!
    "Being prepared is sometimes inconvenient, but not being prepared is always inconvenient." - Fred Choate

  4. #4
    Senior Member hunter63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    SE/SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    26,297

    Default

    AFL, I use it on the dogs sores as well.
    Corn Huskers on hands and dry skin.
    Both are good, and been around for a long time....Gotta tell ya something.
    Geezer Squad....Charter Member #1
    Evoking the 50 year old rule...
    First 50 years...worried about the small stuff...second 50 years....Not so much
    Member Wahoo Killer knives club....#27

  5. #5
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Chugach National Forest
    Posts
    9,795
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    Been using it my whole life. Born on a dairy farm.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Winnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Middle England
    Posts
    5,779
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Similar stuff is known as Udder Salve or Udsal. Great stuff!
    Recession; A period when you go without something your Grandparents never heard of.

  7. #7

    Default

    My Mom swears by it for hands and feet. I've maybe used it a couple times.

    Only job I ever had that wore on my hands was delivery of cardboard packed boxes of stuff. Those boxes draw the moisture right outta your hands and cause them to crack.

    The stuff worked good for that.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Ole WV Coot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Southern WV , raised in Eastern KY up a holler
    Posts
    2,668

    Default

    I'm the same. Used it and cornhuskers for many years. I never was much working with gloves and they worked well.
    Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he's too old
    to fight... he'll just kill you.

  9. #9

    Default

    I used it on my kids for diaper rash and my aunt used it on my cousin when he had cradle cap, nothing better for either condition!

    My daughter, when she was 4, contracted lice in daycare. I coated her head in bag balm and covered it with a shower cap. The next morning I washed her hair and the lice were dead (balm suffocated 'em). I washed out the bag balm and her hair was never softer. Was a great hair conditioner.

    And, no harsh chemicals, like in OTC lice treatments, to get absorbed into her head.
    Everything I have posted is pure fantasy. I have not done any of the things that I have claimed to have done in my posts. I actually live in Detroit.

  10. #10
    Very interesting... mcgyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    142

    Default

    I've got two wonder. While we all like multiple use items.
    Soaking cotton balls in Bag Balm seams like a great opportunity.
    You could still use them as tinder but they could double as applicators for all of the above.
    I think the Lanolin may smoke a little more, but it might just be worth it.
    I think I'm gonna give it a try today.
    Life is 10% of what happens to me and 90% of how I react to it.

  11. #11
    Administrator Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    56,026

    Default

    That's basically what I do with the Vasoline. Chapped lips, hot spots, irritated skin, etc. Still a great fire starter.

  12. #12
    me, myself, and I Trabitha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    North East PA
    Posts
    1,099

    Default

    I haven't seen that stuff in years! I remember us using on the goats when I was little, and not too long after I heard that people used it on their hands had face. I couldn't get past the smell, personally. Have they ever changed that?

    I heard that Horse and Mane shampoo is something that people use too. I wonder if it works well...
    The key to immortality is not having a life worth living, but living a life worth remembering.
    - St. Augustine

    A government big enough to give you everything you want,
    is strong enough to take everything you have.
    - Thomas Jefferson

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kris-C...6355540?ref=nf
    www.etsy.com/shop/KrisAndChrisPlaques
    www.politicsbykrista.blogspot.com

  13. #13
    Very interesting... mcgyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    142

    Default

    So I had a few minutes before the Football Festival to try the Bag Balm soaked cotton ball fire starters.
    I was correct in that the Balm smoked a bit more than the Vaseline version (quite a bit more)
    The odd observation was, that it burned a bit longer than the Vaseline.
    I will have to do some further, more measured comparison to make sure.
    I think the dual use, just might clinch it for me though.
    Life is 10% of what happens to me and 90% of how I react to it.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Camp10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    2,932

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mcgyver View Post
    So I had a few minutes before the Football Festival to try the Bag Balm soaked cotton ball fire starters.
    I was correct in that the Balm smoked a bit more than the Vaseline version (quite a bit more)
    The odd observation was, that it burned a bit longer than the Vaseline.
    I will have to do some further, more measured comparison to make sure.
    I think the dual use, just might clinch it for me though.
    Did it light as easily as vaseline does? It is a great idea..I've been using the stuff for as long as I can remember. I've never thought to try to burn it though.

  15. #15
    Very interesting... mcgyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    142

    Default

    Yes, it did light the same. One good spark and you got flame.
    I was really rather impressed, but then again it is still mainly petroleum jelly.
    Having fire starters that double as an antiseptic balm just makes good combo.
    Life is 10% of what happens to me and 90% of how I react to it.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Stairman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    north Florida
    Posts
    504

    Default

    My Grandma always had a can they called cow salve, same thing though.

  17. #17

    Default

    So what stores do you all buy it in?

  18. #18
    Senior Member Camp10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    2,932

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Batch View Post
    So what stores do you all buy it in?
    Mostly feed stores. There are a few hardware stores around here that also carry it.

  19. #19

    Default

    I'll have to swing into Griff's this week and see if they have it.

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nativedude View Post
    My daughter, when she was 4, contracted lice in daycare. I coated her head in bag balm and covered it with a shower cap. The next morning I washed her hair and the lice were dead (balm suffocated 'em). I washed out the bag balm and her hair was never softer. Was a great hair conditioner.
    This isn't meant to be any part of the other threads. But, I was driving to work and something had me thinking about this thread. I remembered reading the article posted above and the words of advice at the bottom.

    "For all its myriad uses, there's one place its makers say never to use it.

    "Never put Bag Balm in your hair, because you will not get it out," Wilkerson said."


    I got to wondering how easy was it to get out of your daughters hair?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •