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Thread: Mountainman Rendezvous

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Default Mountainman Rendezvous

    Anyone ever go to a mountainman rendezvous? Or Friendship Indiana?
    What about trekking (no not star trek but gtting together and doing a wilderness trek and living off the land for say week.

    If anyone out there would like to present a seminar at next year`s 1838 Rendezvous(FVR hmmm)
    (July 2 - 6, 2008) please email Rick "Smokinghawk" Lechner with a short description of your seminar. We pride ourselves in being a teaching rendezvous but can only be sucessful if people volunteer their skills and share with those who are just beginning. Please think of a skill you would be willing to share and email Rick -- lechner@tctwest.net

    These standards are the bare minimum expected by the 1838 Rendezvous Association. All participants are encouraged to progress into ever more historically accurate representations of people from the Rocky Mountain past. The 1838 Rendezvous association will provide help through this website and participants are encouraged to participate in ongoing discussion groups. Our intent in these standards is not to discourage participation but rather to enhance the rendezvous experience.
    Camp security (dog-soldiers) will ask you, gently, to avoid compromising the following camp standards, but standards will be enforced.
    1. All visible clothing and gear must be pre 1840. This applies to children as well as adults.
    2. Participants must be in suitable pre-1840 attire when in camp. Clothing doesn’t need to be elaborate, just as historically accurate as possible. 1838 camp standards are very forgiving; machine stitched clothing is accepted, but all exposed seams should be hand stitched; do the best you can until you can do better.
    3. Keep plastic water jugs and coolers covered at all times. When hauling water or ice to your camp, keep non-period containers covered. Burlap sacks, canvas, or hides work well to ‘cover’ non-period containers.
    4. Vehicles will be allowed in camp for loading and unloading only. There is a 45-minute unloading time for camps; traders will be allowed up to 2 hours. Vehicles will be allowed into camp only between the hours of seven (7) and nine (9) a.m. and between three (3) and five (5) p.m. Plan your setup and departure accordingly.
    5. Park in the designated parking area. Vehicles parked in unauthorized areas will be towed at owner’s expense. Modern camping is allowed in designated areas. They can park one vehicle at their campsite. Special permits will be issued to handicapped people (see the Booshway or Segundo).
    6. Parents are legally and financially responsible for the actions of their children
    7. All animals must be on a leash or attended by their owners. Owners are liable, legally and financially, for the actions of their pets.
    8. Cannons are allowed at the discretion of the Booshway.
    9. No loaded firearms in camp.
    10. Place trash in designated areas. Bring your own trash bags. A plastic trash bag placed inside a burlap bag is a standard practice.
    11. No chain saws.
    12. Do not cut live trees.
    13. Remove and preserve sod from your fire pit. Replace it when you leave. Preservation of our site is important. Use an existing fire pit when possible. If it is not possible, please do not leave a ring of stones; disperse the stones to their original location.
    14. Campfires must not be left unattended. This time of year is often quite dry and fires are a potential disaster.
    15. You must have a period container of water (at least 3 gallons) near your campfire. Common sense would dictate extinguishing fires in high wind periods.
    16. Fighting will not be tolerated. This includes domestic disturbances.
    17. All local, state, and federal laws regarding sales or consumption of alcohol apply in camp. No beverage in a modern container will be allowed in camp.
    18. Generators are not to be used anywhere on the Rendezvous site during the rendezvous.
    19. Additional: These are some things that should NOT be seen in camp – modern sunglasses, T-shirts, plastic rain gear, bikini or halter tops, tennis shoes, shower shoes, sandals, logger boots, pack boots, cowboy boots (Wellington boots & high button shoes are tolerated), bathing suits, blue jeans, dusters, cowboy hats, black powder cartridge rifles, black powder revolvers (except Paterson models), ‘cowboy’ attire, dance hall attire, Coleman or electric lanterns, flashlights, metal or plastic camp furniture. If you have any questions about what is appropriate, write to the 1838 Rendezvous Association or log on to our website’s discussion forum.

    Traders (Merchants)
    1. All trade goods must be pre-1840
    2. The Booshway has the final authority over all disputes involving trade goods. The burden of proof regarding authenticity is on the trader.
    3. All furs and animal parts for sale must comply with local state and federal laws. The individual is responsible for the legality of his trade goods.
    4. No plastic in a trader’s tent. This includes blister packs, Styrofoam, blanket wraps, candy containers, etc.
    5. No sticky tags.
    6. Books, magazines, patterns, original works of art and limited edition prints must pertain to the pre-1840 era.
    7. Please keep jewelry to the style of the era.
    8. All guns for sale must be pre-1840
    9. No tailgate setups will be allowed in the parking area.
    10. All trading must be done from pre-1840 structures, except blanket traders.

    The above standards will be enforced in the authentic trapper, trader, and horse camps. There will also be a modern ‘tin teepee’ area available for camping for those not able or willing to ‘stay period’. We encourage those in the modern camping areas attempt to stay as period as possible (i.e. Stay in period dress, no generators, etc.).

    http://www.1838rendezvous.com
    Last edited by Beo; 11-15-2007 at 10:36 AM.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.


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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Default Trekking

    The Historical Trekker
    A historical trekker is a person who has a great interest in a historical time period. Their infatuation with it goes beyond only reading available historical literature. They have acquired historically correct clothing, firearms, and all other necessary accoutrements that were actually available and being used during their time frame of personal interest. This person usually chooses a persona which is a specific character-roll from their time period of interest. The persona chosen might be a Rocky Mountain Trapper, Eastern Longhunter, French & Indian War participant, Revolutionary War participant, Southwestern Frontiersman, Farmer, Hunter, Trader, French Voyager, Native American, etc. Part of the persona will be a time frame and a geographical location. With their chosen persona, authentic accoutrements, and literary knowledge, the historical trekker enjoys adventures or treks in the wilderness, such as National Forests, etc. There, far away from the settlements, the historical trekker is able to experience the lifestyle lived by the early frontier people. The words "historical" and "trek" are defined in Webster's New World Dictionary as follows: "Historical" - (1) concerned with history as a science: as, the historical method. (2) providing evidence for a fact of history. "Trek"- (2) a journey or leg of a journey. The word "trek" was not a common word of the pre-1840 frontier, but it has been chosen to use in reference to activities in historical experimental archaeology. To go on a historical trek is to journey back in time.
    ...Rick Edwards, Previous Editor - On The Trail magazine

    I am often asked why I indulge in this hobby called Historical Trekking? First I explain to folks that I do not consider it a "hobby", I prefer to refer to it as a Lifestyle. Naturally not everyone understands. Why would anyone wish to go into the woods with only a minimum amount of "old timey" gear? The few neighbors I have now know I 'm not dangerous, nor crazy. When they see me in my historical period garb they know I'm just out having fun. I really believe seeking a more simple lifestyle is just in my blood. I love being in the woods, and free of the 20th Century if only for a short time. Beit on a Scout to locate new material for a pair of Snowshoes to be constructed or looking for some dry rotten wood for smoking some deer hides. Trekking is very healthy too. You build up your wind, strengthen your heart and lungs. From the moment you dress in your primitive clothing you are transported back to a time when there were no schedules to keep, telephones, televisions, no rat race -- plain and simple. You feel the comfort of your well worn shirt, and detect the aroma of dozens of past campfires. Your moccasins cling to your feet like a second skin. You shoulder your knapsack and shooting bag, and feel the heft of your longrifle in your hand. You smile. You feel a certain sense of comfort knowing that along with your knife and tomahawk you could live well without anything else for a long time -- and in relative comfort. Moving along an ancient path that has been worn smooth by hundreds of feet, you feel at peace with yourself. The warm afternoon sun on your face, striding along with no one to answer to except yourself and the Almighty. Regardless whether you walk, ride a horse, or trek by watercraft, you get a certain joy while out reliving the past. As you move along, blood flows through your body feeding every cell oxygen -- gliding along you put the miles behind. You feel really alive and refreshed.

    A Historical Trekker is one who has more than likely been caught in a sudden Spring shower and has felt the Summer sun beat down on him as the waterproofing melts from his mocs. You can call yourself a Historical Trekker when you have had to brush the heavy Autumn frost off your blanket on a morning in late October, and felt Old Man Winter's icy blast on your face -- then you can call yourself a Historical Trekker. A Historical Trekker has gone up near vertical inclines, through briar patches, crossed ice cold streams, swamps, and gone over ground only a Mountain Goat could negotiate.
    I can only warn you, Historical Trekking can get a powerful grip on you. More addictive than any drug, the only way to satisfy the craving is don your pack, snatch up your longrifle, pouch, and horn and simply head for the wilderness forest.
    In closing let me leave you with some thoughts by some great thinkers and writers...


    ...Chuck Casada, staff writer for On The Trail magazine

    The swiftest traveler is he that goes afoot. -- Thoreau

    He travels the fastest who travels alone. -- Kipling

    The civilized man has built a coach, but he has lost the use of his feet. -- Emerson

    "The poetry of history lies in the miraculous fact that once on this earth, on this familiar spot of ground, walked other men and women as actual as we are today, thinking their own thoughts, swayed by their own passions, but now all gone, vanishing one after another, gone as utterly as we ourselves shall be gone like ghosts at cockcrow."
    ...G.M. Trevelyan

    A good link on Trekking: http://historicaltrekking.com
    and: http://www.ottmagazine.com (this is On The Trail Magazine) love it.
    Last edited by Beo; 11-15-2007 at 10:53 AM.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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    Senior Member LadyTrapper's Avatar
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    These sound very interesting. Never been to a mountainman rendevous, but have attending our annual Trapper's Rendevous which is mostly skinning/tanningworkshops, seminars, hands on techniques and contests such as the beaver toss and trap setting race. Lots of fun they are. We camp out by the lake for a week in the middle of nowhere with a bunch of other trappers. We can also drop furs off for the HudsonBay auction here to be shipped for sale.
    The one you are posting about sounds much more into the era I find interesting. Sounds pretty cool.
    ~Earth receives foot and paw, hoof and claw with equal grace. But it is the way of the wild not to overstep...let's leave no trace that wind, rain and snow cannot erase~

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Yeah went to a few years back and wanna go again, but Historical Trekking is more my taste as I like to keep on the move plying my outdoor skills, during a trek the promoters actually get permission for us to shoot rabbit and squirrel for our own food, flintlock not over .35 or .45 cal. so its kinda fun, then we start working the skin and the other parts of the animal for other uses.
    Last edited by Beo; 11-15-2007 at 12:19 PM.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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    a bushbaby owl_girl's Avatar
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    I go to a pioneer rendezvous every year. The people there are so knowledgeable about everything from how they survived back then to the politics of that era. That’s where I learned how to start a fire with flint and steel. Omg I love their fry bread!

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    I'd like to put together a Trek here, maybe a two or three day trek, week would be great.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    How large of a group of people does this usually include bro? and what territory are you looking at? (I suspect he's more than thinking about this )
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Groups usually in five or six, if more want go they divide up into two or more groups and head out ending up in a central location, switch up groups and routes and trek back.
    Looking at Minnesota, North Dakota, Montana, or up in your area Canada. The trekking I do is not re-enacting, although most people who have gone wear period clothing, and its not a Rendezvous as no goods are bought or sold. I myself wear either my kilt and leggings, hunters shirt or frock, or cargo pant kahakis with leggings and a muslin shirt, moc's always and a balmoral cap, take my flintlock (if bringing a weaapon) for squirrel or rabbit. Some of the best times I've had have been on these treks, although some Rendezvous do have treks at them and they are a really good time too.
    Last edited by Beo; 11-15-2007 at 02:31 PM.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Oh btw, its not a matter of "if" but "when" i get the trek together so your right, thinking of a spring weekend trek maybe 3 days, and a longer week trek say five days.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beowulf65 View Post
    Anyone ever go to a mountainman rendezvous? Or Friendship Indiana?
    What about trekking (no not star trek but gtting together and doing a wilderness trek and living off the land for say week.

    If anyone out there would like to present a seminar at next year`s 1838 Rendezvous(FVR hmmm)
    (July 2 - 6, 2008) please email Rick "Smokinghawk" Lechner with a short description of your seminar. We pride ourselves in being a teaching rendezvous but can only be sucessful if people volunteer their skills and share with those who are just beginning. Please think of a skill you would be willing to share and email Rick -- lechner@tctwest.net

    These standards are the bare minimum expected by the 1838 Rendezvous Association. All participants are encouraged to progress into ever more historically accurate representations of people from the Rocky Mountain past. The 1838 Rendezvous association will provide help through this website and participants are encouraged to participate in ongoing discussion groups. Our intent in these standards is not to discourage participation but rather to enhance the rendezvous experience.
    Camp security (dog-soldiers) will ask you, gently, to avoid compromising the following camp standards, but standards will be enforced.
    1. All visible clothing and gear must be pre 1840. This applies to children as well as adults.
    2. Participants must be in suitable pre-1840 attire when in camp. Clothing doesn’t need to be elaborate, just as historically accurate as possible. 1838 camp standards are very forgiving; machine stitched clothing is accepted, but all exposed seams should be hand stitched; do the best you can until you can do better.
    3. Keep plastic water jugs and coolers covered at all times. When hauling water or ice to your camp, keep non-period containers covered. Burlap sacks, canvas, or hides work well to ‘cover’ non-period containers.
    4. Vehicles will be allowed in camp for loading and unloading only. There is a 45-minute unloading time for camps; traders will be allowed up to 2 hours. Vehicles will be allowed into camp only between the hours of seven (7) and nine (9) a.m. and between three (3) and five (5) p.m. Plan your setup and departure accordingly.
    5. Park in the designated parking area. Vehicles parked in unauthorized areas will be towed at owner’s expense. Modern camping is allowed in designated areas. They can park one vehicle at their campsite. Special permits will be issued to handicapped people (see the Booshway or Segundo).
    6. Parents are legally and financially responsible for the actions of their children
    7. All animals must be on a leash or attended by their owners. Owners are liable, legally and financially, for the actions of their pets.
    8. Cannons are allowed at the discretion of the Booshway.
    9. No loaded firearms in camp.
    10. Place trash in designated areas. Bring your own trash bags. A plastic trash bag placed inside a burlap bag is a standard practice.
    11. No chain saws.
    12. Do not cut live trees.
    13. Remove and preserve sod from your fire pit. Replace it when you leave. Preservation of our site is important. Use an existing fire pit when possible. If it is not possible, please do not leave a ring of stones; disperse the stones to their original location.
    14. Campfires must not be left unattended. This time of year is often quite dry and fires are a potential disaster.
    15. You must have a period container of water (at least 3 gallons) near your campfire. Common sense would dictate extinguishing fires in high wind periods.
    16. Fighting will not be tolerated. This includes domestic disturbances.
    17. All local, state, and federal laws regarding sales or consumption of alcohol apply in camp. No beverage in a modern container will be allowed in camp.
    18. Generators are not to be used anywhere on the Rendezvous site during the rendezvous.
    19. Additional: These are some things that should NOT be seen in camp – modern sunglasses, T-shirts, plastic rain gear, bikini or halter tops, tennis shoes, shower shoes, sandals, logger boots, pack boots, cowboy boots (Wellington boots & high button shoes are tolerated), bathing suits, blue jeans, dusters, cowboy hats, black powder cartridge rifles, black powder revolvers (except Paterson models), ‘cowboy’ attire, dance hall attire, Coleman or electric lanterns, flashlights, metal or plastic camp furniture. If you have any questions about what is appropriate, write to the 1838 Rendezvous Association or log on to our website’s discussion forum.

    Traders (Merchants)
    1. All trade goods must be pre-1840
    2. The Booshway has the final authority over all disputes involving trade goods. The burden of proof regarding authenticity is on the trader.
    3. All furs and animal parts for sale must comply with local state and federal laws. The individual is responsible for the legality of his trade goods.
    4. No plastic in a trader’s tent. This includes blister packs, Styrofoam, blanket wraps, candy containers, etc.
    5. No sticky tags.
    6. Books, magazines, patterns, original works of art and limited edition prints must pertain to the pre-1840 era.
    7. Please keep jewelry to the style of the era.
    8. All guns for sale must be pre-1840
    9. No tailgate setups will be allowed in the parking area.
    10. All trading must be done from pre-1840 structures, except blanket traders.

    The above standards will be enforced in the authentic trapper, trader, and horse camps. There will also be a modern ‘tin teepee’ area available for camping for those not able or willing to ‘stay period’. We encourage those in the modern camping areas attempt to stay as period as possible (i.e. Stay in period dress, no generators, etc.).

    http://www.1838rendezvous.com
    Friendship Indiana is not too far away from me.
    Soular powered by the son.

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    missing in action trax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nell67 View Post
    Friendship Indiana is not too far away from me.
    No doubt, probably Grumpy Indiana would be on the other side of the state. Personally, I live somewhere between the states of bewilderment and blissful ignorance..
    some fella confronted me the other day and asked "What's your problem?" So I told him, "I don't have a problem I am a problem"

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    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trax View Post
    No doubt, probably Grumpy Indiana would be on the other side of the state. Personally, I live somewhere between the states of bewilderment and blissful ignorance..
    No really LOL there is a place called Friendship Inidana!,Havent been there though.
    Soular powered by the son.

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    I go to Friendship Inidana every year its a really good time, now its open year round
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

  14. #14
    Senior Member nell67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beowulf65 View Post
    I go to Friendship Inidana every year its a really good time, now its open year round
    Gonna have to go check it out sometime.
    Soular powered by the son.

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    Senior Member FVR's Avatar
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    Have not been to Friendship, Yet!

    I do however make two one day rendezvous a year. One is the Bear Creek and the other is the Ga COHT Fall get together. Missed the COHT this year.

    Spent a few years as a vendor at a variety of rendezvous and pow wows. Whe it got to be more about the money than the fun, I quit. Sold alot of bows.

    I organized a 3 day hog hunt years back. Posted the camp area, oh about 3.5 miles back into the mountains. We must have had 15 trekkers and a few trad. bowhunters who wanted to hike back. Most were in period gear, we did not care as long as everyone was cool.

    I am wanting to do a few day trek soon, but I just can't as I don't want to sacrifice the time away from the family. Two 5 year olds are alot to handle and my stay at home wife does need a break every now and then.

    So, in three years my son and I will be hitting the woods for extended stays. For now, day events.
    Can't cheat the mountain, pilgrim.
    Mountain got it....

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    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    Bring the whole family bro,
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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    Senior Member FVR's Avatar
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    Easier said than done. See, I married a city girl. Now, she's come around alot, but not to the point of rendezvous.

    Almost had her talked into living in a tepee at the base of the Rocky Mountains, once. Once!
    Can't cheat the mountain, pilgrim.
    Mountain got it....

  18. #18
    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    I know, I married a city girl myself, although she puts up with me, wouldn't trade her. She lets me be me and hit the woods whenever I wanna.
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

  19. #19
    Tracker Beo's Avatar
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    well might trade her for a good hawkins .50 ...lol...
    There is no greater solitude than that of the Tracker in the forest, unless perhaps it's that of the wolf in the wilderness.

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