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Jericho117

I Just Copied And Pasted This From My Myspace!!!as With The Other Blogs!!!

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Cordage making......my way

I consider the type of matreials for this job. My favorite is sinew, Indian Hemp is fine, and Yucca, well just check my pictures. I think Yucca is found throughout the southwestern region, and Indian Hemp found in the northeastern region, but sinew is found whereever you get an animal. Hemp cordage is my second favorite (being that it is easy to identify and the leaves can be crushed to poison fish for food, but im always careful with preperation). I strip long sections of the bark off. I use rock to pound fibers out, and soak them in water. I then twist and kink the strands of fibers togehter, and to get bowstring I splice them together. This method of splicing does not produce knots, just an even long strand of cordage. Give me a good amount of cordage material and I can produce you a bowstring in less than 30 minutes. Sinew is found on the back and legs of snimals. It can be cut out, dried, and pounded. Sinew makes very very very strong cordage, and I made a snare out of a strand before ( never caught anything with it but it had the same basic qualities as a nylon snare). Yucca makes cordage, the roots can be crushed and added to water for soap, and the yellow flowers are edible, I beleive. Cordage making is very simple and is good to know. But I only use homemade cordage ocassionally. Splicing is done by getting a long length of fibers and a slighlty shorter length of fibers. The even ends are tied together with an overhand knot. The shorter end is twisted around another end of long fibers, and the first longer fibers are wrapped around the twists to secure them, then I repeat the proccess to get long cordage. Twisted animal intestine is used by me for bowstrings and campcraft, while the dried inner bark of trees like Maple, Basswood, and many others provide really strong cordage. I strip a few pieces of each tree, soak them in creek water for about a couple hours, and remove the inner bark, twisting it into strong cordage to dry. This is especially useful for me when I make small game snares or flechting materials, and it could make a servicable bowstring, but I have never made one before out of inner bark. Also, with stretched animal hides, like those from Deer or Woodchuck, using a knife I cut a spiral in the hide, stretch out the cord and twist it to dry. I have done this with a rotten Deer, check my pictures. Another method I feel takes some time but removes all non-fibourous ppant material is soaking. I dig a small trench at the side of a creek where water can flow in, and I put the cordage material into the water. I let it sit for a good week, and by then all non-fiborous material will be rotted away.

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