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2dumb2kwit
09-18-2009, 12:38 PM
I'm making my first Rick Jerky, (Rick recipe, not Rick meat.) and I have a question. Has anyone used this recipe for ham jerky?

I got my first dehydrator, the other day, so now I'm playing with it. Along with the jerky, I cut up a banana, a pear, a cheddar sausage, and a bread and butter pickle spear, and put them in the dehydrator! LOL Now I'm wondering if all those flavors are going to run together. YUCK! I know that the kitchen already smalls like condensed soy sauce!:blushing:

Rick
09-18-2009, 02:30 PM
I have not tried ham. I don't know why it wouldn't work. Just remember that pork has more fat than beef so it will go rancid quicker. You will probably want to store the ham in the fridge after you make it. Partially freeze the ham so it's easier to slice. Keep slices 1/4 inch or less and discard any fat on the ham. If you want a tender jerky, slice across the grain. If you want a chewy jerky, slice with the grain. Go ahead and marinate the ham just like beef. Blot the excess moisture off it and put it in the dehydrator. It should be done when you can bend it and it cracks but doesn't break.

As to the odors blending, that shouldn't be a problem. I've dehydrated cereal and onions in the same batch and didn't have any trouble...other than the house had to be aired out.

You'll just need to keep an eye on the different items. Since they had different moisture content some will dry quicker than the others.

When you do something like a bread and butter pickle, you can blot it with a paper towel to remove as much liquid as possible from the pickle. The less water going into the dehydrator the less time required to process.

Let us know how it turns out.

Winnie
09-18-2009, 05:20 PM
Showing my ignorance again, what's a bread and butter pickle?

pocomoonskyeyes
09-18-2009, 05:24 PM
here you go Winnie, try this link.
http://elise.com/recipes/archives/007318bread_and_butter_pickles.php

finallyME
09-18-2009, 05:50 PM
I didn't know what bread and butter pickles were either. Maybe it is an east coast thing.

Rick
09-18-2009, 09:21 PM
Nope. My mom made them all the time. Bread and butter pickles are the ..... dare I say it? ..... bread and butter of pickle canning.

nell67
09-18-2009, 09:23 PM
Nope. My mom made them all the time. Bread and butter pickles are ..... dare I say it? ..... NASTY.:clap::clap::clap::clap:

Rick
09-18-2009, 09:29 PM
Oh, my! A quote plagerizer!!!!!!

nell67
09-18-2009, 09:30 PM
Oh, my! A quote plagerizer!!!!!!:blushing::bat::sneaky2:

oldsoldier
09-18-2009, 09:30 PM
[QUOTE=2dumb2kwit;156451]I'm making my first Rick Jerky, (Rick recipe, not Rick meat.) and I have a question. Has anyone used this recipe for ham jerky?

Well crap 2D you had me excited I thought you had a sure fire way to dispose of the evedince:innocent:

nell67
09-18-2009, 09:31 PM
[quote=2dumb2kwit;156451]I'm making my first Rick Jerky, (Rick recipe, not Rick meat.) and I have a question. Has anyone used this recipe for ham jerky?

Well crap 2D you had me excited I thought you had a sure fire way to dispose of the evedince:innocent:

See OS,I think we were thinking alike,I thought 2D was actually making Rick INTO jerky......

Winnie
09-19-2009, 04:14 AM
here you go Winnie, try this link.
http://elise.com/recipes/archives/007318bread_and_butter_pickles.php

Aha! we call them Gherkins over here!

crashdive123
09-19-2009, 06:32 AM
Aha! we call them Gherkins over here!

The Bread & Butter pickles (here anyway) are sliced into chips. The Gherkins (again, here anyway) are made from tiny cucumbers.

http://www.razzledazzlerecipes.com/flavorsoffall/gherkin-pickles.htm

Rick
09-19-2009, 07:48 AM
English is SUCH a fun language.

As for making me into jerky. You're probably looking at a somewhat larger dehydrator...

http://www.dryer.com/images/SLF1-01.jpg

Winnie
09-19-2009, 12:38 PM
The Bread & Butter pickles (here anyway) are sliced into chips. The Gherkins (again, here anyway) are made from tiny cucumbers.

http://www.razzledazzlerecipes.com/flavorsoffall/gherkin-pickles.htm

Your Gherkins are known as Cornichons over here any way.

Can't say as I'm partial to either tho!

Winnie
09-19-2009, 12:57 PM
Just a couple of quick questions, what's the best way to store jerky once it's made? Would any old airtight container do, or would it last longer in a canning jar with an oxygen absorbing pouch.
Also can you use game birds? shooting season started a couple of weeks ago and I always get a few birds given to me, but I find they don't freeze well so I'm looking into alternative methods of storing them

crashdive123
09-19-2009, 02:25 PM
I've never been able to store it long enough to tell. It goes pretty quick around here once it is made. For those that are able to have it around and actually store it, I imagine in a jar with an oxygen absorber, or vacuum packing would be best.

Rick
09-19-2009, 03:29 PM
Believe it or not, I have some beef jerky in the cabinet in a zip lock back that has been there for 3 months. A little experiment on how long the stuff will last. Seems to be doing fine.

2dumb2kwit
09-19-2009, 04:11 PM
OK, here's my report.
Rick jerky, (Rick recipe, not Rick meat) Pretty good. The flavor is kinda strong, but I left it in the marinade kinda long....maybe that's why.

Ham jerky. I'll eat it, but I won't make it again. I guess because of all the water injected into the ham, (at least the ham that I used) the out side of it gets really hard, before the middle gets very dried out.

B+B pickle spear. LOL, about the only thing left is some skin! OK...OK....everyone knew that a pickle is mostly water.

Cheddar sausage. (Johnsonville "Beddar Cheddars") Pretty dang good! Kinda like a less greasy "Slim Jim"....with cheese. (I wonder if these would reconstitute well, for camp cooking?)

Winnie
09-19-2009, 06:01 PM
Oh now I've really lost it What on earth is cheddar sausage??

crashdive123
09-19-2009, 06:07 PM
Oh now I've really lost it What on earth is cheddar sausage??

Some mighty fine tailgating food.

http://www.johnsonville.com/home/products/brats/cheddar


I may as well head this one off at the pass. Tailgating is the activity prior to a sporting event where you gather with a few thousand of your friends to bbq, grill, and drink.

Rick
09-19-2009, 07:55 PM
2D - I'm surprised you found the flavor strong. I generally marinate over night or at least 8 hours but I've marinated for a couple of days before. I think to be fair, you should send some to QC for an HONEST evaluation.

2dumb2kwit
09-19-2009, 07:57 PM
Some mighty fine tailgating food.

http://www.johnsonville.com/home/products/brats/cheddar


I may as well head this one off at the pass. Tailgating is the activity prior to a sporting event where you gather with a few thousand of your friends to bbq, grill, and drink.

Good job, crash!
Actually I used these, but I think they are about the same.
http://www.johnsonville.com/home/products/smoked/beddar-w-cheddar

What ever you do, don't look at the nutritional info. LOL

crashdive123
09-19-2009, 08:01 PM
2D - I'm surprised you found the flavor strong. I generally marinate over night or at least 8 hours but I've marinated for a couple of days before. I think to be fair, you should send some to QC for an HONEST evaluation.

It really is imperative that you heed the wise words of the Minister of Science.

2dumb2kwit
09-19-2009, 08:02 PM
2D - I'm surprised you found the flavor strong. I generally marinate over night or at least 8 hours but I've marinated for a couple of days before. I think to be fair, you should send some to QC for an HONEST evaluation.

It may be just a strong garlic taste. Maybe I got carried away with the garlic powder. ????

Winnie
09-20-2009, 04:06 AM
Some mighty fine tailgating food.

http://www.johnsonville.com/home/products/brats/cheddar


I may as well head this one off at the pass. Tailgating is the activity prior to a sporting event where you gather with a few thousand of your friends to bbq, grill, and drink.

Why thanks and thanks, that wouldv'e been my next question!:blushing:

Rick
09-20-2009, 07:31 AM
Winnie - It's a bit like stopping at a pub and having fish and chips and a few Carlings prior to the soccer game only it's done in the parking lot of the stadium. The term comes from eating out of the open "tail gate" (car's boot). Those that participate have a tendency to do it in a rather large way and the parties generally start hours and hours before the game.

http://www.unequalledmagazine.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-o-matic/cache/8eeaa_top-10-tailgating-stuff_wDFPg_5784.jpg

http://www.netrootz.com/images/groups/group_31/9EB_tailgating.jpg

Winnie
09-21-2009, 03:47 AM
Wow! If you tried doing that at a footie stadium over her you'd be arrested!

I could see it happening at a rugby stadium though, which reminds me..... must check out availablity for Six Nations Cup.

COWBOYSURVIVAL
12-20-2009, 05:15 PM
I did one thing different. I boiled my meat in the marinade. I used round steak. Freezing for a couple of hours helps a great deal when cutting strips! I boiled it to ensure it got hot enough to kill everything I then cooked it for 4 hours at 170 F. My oven wouldn't go any lower on bake. It came out great!

Rick
12-20-2009, 05:19 PM
I boiled it to ensure it got hot enough to kill everything

I've found it helps if the cow is dead before you start slicing on it. Then...oh, wait....you meant....never mind.

I'm glad it turned out well for you and I'm glad you liked it. I had never thought of boiling it. I suppose vacuum sealing it for 24 hours would infuse the marinate deep into the beef as well. As for killing any germs, as long as the meat is dried then there shouldn't be any problem at all. As I said in another post, I've had it last six months with not problem and it was still edible and quite good.

COWBOYSURVIVAL
12-20-2009, 05:29 PM
I've found it helps if the cow is dead before you start slicing on it. Then...oh, wait....you meant....never mind.

I'm glad it turned out well for you and I'm glad you liked it. I had never thought of boiling it. I suppose vacuum sealing it for 24 hours would infuse the marinate deep into the beef as well. As for killing any germs, as long as the meat is dried then there shouldn't be any problem at all. As I said in another post, I've had it last six months with not problem and it was still edible and quite good.

According to the USDA most dehydrators don't get hot enough to kill the bacteria. That is where I found the boiling reference. I ran accross your family recipe and modified to my taste. Worked really well boiling foregoes the overnight marinating and retained the flavor of the marinade. Also Since it was boiled I can freeze the marinade for the next go around. Thanks for your recipe Rick! i think I got it off of a different post than this one. Couldn't find it today though. Boiling would be especially recommended for deer as it could be contaminated by fecal matter.

Rick
12-20-2009, 05:34 PM
I appreciate the heads up on the USDA info. Good stuff. In reading through their site they recommend:

"Steam or roast meat to 160 F and poultry to 165 F as measured with a food thermometer before dehydrating it."

So your boiling would certainly do that.

Source: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/FactSheets/Jerky_and_Food_Safety/index.asp

COWBOYSURVIVAL
12-20-2009, 05:39 PM
I appreciate the heads up on the USDA info. Good stuff. In reading through their site they recommend:

"Steam or roast meat to 160 F and poultry to 165 F as measured with a food thermometer before dehydrating it."

So your boiling would certainly do that.

Source: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/FactSheets/Jerky_and_Food_Safety/index.asp

Boiling also makes quick work of the fat. Probably extending shelf life. Mine probably won't make the shelf! USDA states 3 months...I boiled it in the marinade itself. By freezing the sauce I also cut the cost to make it!

COWBOYSURVIVAL
12-20-2009, 05:42 PM
I really didn't boil it per say. I used a thermometer and held 160 for about 5 min. It wasn't a rolling boil, just a little bubbly!

Rick
12-20-2009, 05:43 PM
Yeah, mine doesn't last long either. The six month stuff has a test batch to see how long it would last. I can see where the boiling would render the fat very well. I'm going to have to try that.

COWBOYSURVIVAL
12-20-2009, 05:45 PM
I also applied a dry spice rub before baking. What I really like about boiling is it can be done in the field.

Chris
01-08-2010, 11:26 PM
Just a couple of quick questions, what's the best way to store jerky once it's made? Would any old airtight container do, or would it last longer in a canning jar with an oxygen absorbing pouch.
Also can you use game birds? shooting season started a couple of weeks ago and I always get a few birds given to me, but I find they don't freeze well so I'm looking into alternative methods of storing them
A canister is best.

A bag has less air in it and can sit up against the meat holding moisture up against it.

A canister allows air to flow around the meat, ideally keeping it dry.

This goes for all dried foods.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002T4ZL4?ie=UTF8&tag=everythingshak06&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B0002T4ZL4

They come in all styles and whatnot, your grandma may have had some made of stoneware. I like these though because you can see whats in them.

Remember though, light makes things go rancid as well, so keep them in the pantry, not on the counter (or use an opaque canister, but then you can't see inside it).

Chris
01-08-2010, 11:30 PM
According to the USDA most dehydrators don't get hot enough to kill the bacteria. That is where I found the boiling reference. I ran accross your family recipe and modified to my taste. Worked really well boiling foregoes the overnight marinating and retained the flavor of the marinade. Also Since it was boiled I can freeze the marinade for the next go around. Thanks for your recipe Rick! i think I got it off of a different post than this one. Couldn't find it today though. Boiling would be especially recommended for deer as it could be contaminated by fecal matter.
True jerky is never cooked. The drying & curing process alone is enough to make it safe to eat. And by cooking it you change the flavor profile, permanently.

Though, I wouldn't start with feces smeared deer.

Beo
01-11-2010, 11:30 AM
Just wondering what dehydrator everyone uses, I have two of the Ronco Dehydrator stacks and use the crap outta them, ya just gotta get used to having to rotate the shelves.

Rick
01-11-2010, 12:46 PM
I have the 5 tray garden Excalibur.

Beo
01-11-2010, 01:57 PM
True jerky is never cooked. The drying & curing process alone is enough to make it safe to eat. And by cooking it you change the flavor profile, permanently.

Though, I wouldn't start with feces smeared deer.

Yeah, I never tried to dehydrate feces, maybe Bear Grylls has... lol...
Never had a problem with feces on my deer meat, ever. So I don't know what the heck he's talking about. Only hit the bladder once when I was greenhorn buckskinner and then I washed it off right away and no problems.